Announcements


Highlights from 2013 Gala

posted Aug 24, 2013, 9:36 AM by Steve Duncan

Joy Kogawa slideshow


A fantastic time was had by all last night at the festival gala. 

Here is the slideshow we tried to play last night. 

10 Questions for 10th Anniversary of the Festival - Fiona Tinwei Lam

posted Aug 16, 2013, 9:28 AM by Natasha Boskic   [ updated Aug 16, 2013, 9:29 AM ]

Fiona Tinwei Lam

P. C.: When and where are you happiest?

Fiona Tinwei Lam: Reading aloud to my son at bedtime or having a conversation with him while we walk home after school.

Birthing the first and the final drafts of a really interesting poem or essay.

Waking after getting a really good night's sleep (rare).

Moments of real connection with another human being.

 

P. C.: What is a poem you might carry in your pocket?

FTL: Czeslaw Milosz's "On Angels" or maybe Tomas Transtromer's "Half-Finished Heaven"

 

P. C.: What is your favourite memory from childhood?

FTL: The two poems I wrote in elementary school.

 

P. C.: What is your most unappealing habit?

FTL: Too many to mention.

 

P. C.: What do you eat on a bad day?

FTL: Comfort foods:   basmati rice with sag paneer or dal, homemade soup, warm fruit-based desserts, dark chocolate.

 

P. C.: What do you always carry with you?

FTL: Keys and bus tickets or change for the bus.

 

P. C.: Do you play a musical instrument? Have you ever?

FTL: Classical piano (Brahms is a favourite). Just started to learn the cello this year. I can play a few chords on the guitar or ukelele.

 

P. C.: What is one thing you will not eat?

FTL: More than one thing:  beche de mer, foie gras, escargot, bugs (although I have eaten ground-up crickets)

 

P. C.: If you were not a writer what would you be doing instead?

FTL: A blues singer or some kind of musician, if I had any talent!

 

P. C.: What keeps you awake at night?

FTL: The discouraging and deteriorating state of the world. Potential or actual harm or danger to those I love. My relative powerlessness to make a difference.

 

P. C.: What are you currently working on?

FTL: A book of poetry and a book of nonfiction about the aforementioned.

10 Questions for 10th Anniversary of the Festival - kc dyer

posted Aug 14, 2013, 10:31 PM by Natasha Boskic   [ updated Aug 15, 2013, 4:40 PM ]

kc dyer
kc dyer

P. C.: If you were an animal, what would you be?

K. C.: I'm pretty sure I'd want to be a bird. Or a dog. Maybe a soaring bird-dog...?

 

P. C.: What is your greatest fear?

K. C.: Not really fond of the idea of being dead. I have too much to do!

 

P. C.: What is your most unappealing habit?

K. C.: Worrying. Particularly about being dead. Unless, maybe I can come back as a ...soaring bird-dog?

 

P. C.: Would you read an Ebook? Why?

K. C.: Yes! I read them when I am away from home and can't carry books. Read THE SONG OF ICE AND FIRE while I was away in the UK last month. But every e-book I own, I also have in hard copy. Can't give up the real thing!

 

P. C.: What do you always carry with you?

K. C.: Notebook. Pens. Phone. And usually my computer. I take my office with me wherever I go!

 

P. C.: If you are looking for inspiration in Vancouver where will you go?

K. C.: In the city. In the woods. Near the water. This is why Vancouver is such an inspirational place!

 

P. C.: What is one thing you will not eat?

K. C.: Well, I'm veggie, so I feel pretty free to murder vegetables, but not much else.

 

P. C.: What keeps you awake at night?

K. C.: See answers #2 & #3!

 

P. C.: What is your motto?

K. C.: Um...Stayin' Alive?

 

P. C.: What are you currently working on?

K. C.: A mammoth project I began in 2006. I hope to finish it before I..., well, you know.

10 Questions for 10th Anniversary of the Festival - Chris Gilpin

posted Aug 2, 2013, 12:04 PM by Natasha Boskic   [ updated Aug 14, 2013, 10:31 PM ]

Chris gilpin
Chris Gilpin

P. C.: What is your favourite word?

C. G.: Staunch. The sound of the word fortifies one's resolve.  

 

P. C.: What is a poem you might carry in your pocket?

C. G.: Any chapbook by Fernando Raguero travels well.  

 

P. C.: What is your most favoured place to write?

C. G.: At home, typing on my iPad at my high table.  

 

P. C.: What books are on your nightstand?

C. G.: "I Love Science" by Shanny Jean Maney, "The Wind-up Bird Chronicles" by Haruki Murakami, "American Dust Revisited" by Brian Ellis. 

 

P. C.: Would you read an Ebook? Why?

C. G.: I haven't tried it yet, but I'd like to. My parents have made the switch and they read as much as ever.  

 

P. C.: If you are looking for inspiration in Vancouver where will you go?

C. G.: For me, inspiration comes from memory not direct observation.  

 

P. C.: What poem/song do you wish you had written?

C. G.: "Unlistenable Song" by Geoff Berner, or really, anything by him.  

 

P. C.: If you were not a writer what would you be doing instead?

C. G.: I'd probably be more involved in making websites and video for the web, although I still do a bit of that.  

 

P. C.: What is your motto?

C. G.: "Everything beckons to us to perceive it." -Rainer Maria Rilke 

 

P. C.: What are you currently working on?

C. G.: Poems, poems, and more poems. 

10 Questions for 10th Anniversary of the Festival - Kevin Spenst

posted Aug 1, 2013, 9:27 PM by Natasha Boskic   [ updated Aug 15, 2013, 4:41 PM ]

Kevin Spenst
Kevin Spenst

P. C.: What is your favourite word?

K. S.: My favourite word changes from day to day. I'll be reading when a word is suddenly high-lighted by a little extra white. I jot it down and then try to use it in a poem. My least favourite word is "standardization." It's overstayed its welcome and has haunted me by randomly coming to mind over the past four years. Perhaps a word exorcism is in order although I wouldn't know who to call for the proceedings. (a witch-doctor linguist?)


P . C.: What is a poem you might carry in your pocket?

K. S.: Rilke's Archaic Torso of Apollo. From start to finish it's strange and powerful. It ends "for here there is no place / that does not see you. You must change your life." 

We cannot know his legendary head

with eyes like ripening fruit. And yet his torso

is still suffused with brilliance from inside,

like a lamp, in which his gaze, now turned to low,

 

gleams in all its power. Otherwise

the curved breast could not dazzle you so, nor could

a smile run through the placid hips and thighs

to that dark center where procreation flared.

 

Otherwise this stone would seem defaced

beneath the translucent cascade of the shoulders

and would not glisten like a wild beast's fur:

 

would not, from all the borders of itself,

burst like a star: for here there is no place

that does not see you. You must change your life.

- See more at: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15814#sthash.5Uy2Rg.


P. C.: What do you always carry in your pocket?
K. S.: Like millions I always have my iPhone in my pocket. I've found it tremendously helpful for writing poetry. Wherever I am, I can stop and take down lines for the start of a new poem or create something to be grafted onto something I've been working on for a while. 


P.C.: If you are looking for inspiration in Vancouver where will you go?

K. S.: I'll walk. I'll walk in any old direction my feet take me. I sometimes bring a book and read which surprises people but its not too hard to keep a little attention out on the periphery while you read a book of poems. I've been reading Sandra Ridley, Paul Tyler and Don McKay the past couple of days. You read somebody who's attuned to their world and when you look up from the page, you're bound to be inspired by whatever awaits. 


P. C.: What is one thing you will not eat?

K. S.: I love all food. It did, however, take me twenty years to learn to love olives. I travelled through Europe when I was twenty years old, but in Greece I could not get into olives. I felt like a cretan and yet I knew I was missing out on something spectacular. Whenever I got a chance I'd take a small bite, make a face and spit it out. Last month, I was enjoying some black olives while making dinner, when the unlikeliness of this situation suddenly struck me. I don't know how it happened. There was no gradual incline towards liking them a little more bit by bit. I hated them last year and now I love them. Perhaps, life has gotten so busy that I no longer have time to dislike things. Maybe all this poetry has helped me see and eat things anew. 


P. C.: If you were not a writer what would you be doing instead?

K. S.: Acting in plays where I'm a neurotic/confident/zany/saintly/murderous/humble/arrogant/etc. writer. 


P. C.: If there was a song about your life, what would the title be?

K. S.: I don't know but I'd like to think that it would be sung by Weird Al Yankovic doing a Leonard Cohen cover of Metallica.


P. C.: What keeps you awake at night?

K. S.: That song I imagined of Weird Al Yankovic doing a Leonard Cohen cover of Metallica.

 

P. C.: What is your motto?

K. S.: Ad utrumque paratus - prepared for either alternative. If I get excited about a possibility, (winning a literary contest, getting some book acceptance) I imagine it in its most glorious version possible and then immediately imagine it again with the worst possible outcome which is not exactly what Virgil had in mind when he wrote that, but the sentiment is there: be open and ready to the possibilities. 


P. C.: What are you currently working on?

K. S.: I have two chapbooks coming out this Fall through the Alfred Gustav Press and the serif of nottingham, but I'm hoping to make it a hat-trick. I'm working on a couple other small collections which I'll be sending out in the hopes that they'll be accepted by a couple other presses I adore. My goal is to do a chapbook tour of Canada next May to promote small presses across Canada. It makes sense that many people may not know about these local poetry scenes because they are so highly individualized. By definition there can't be a CNN or CBC for these scenes as each speaks in such a specific idiom. Having said that, there might be unique ways to raise awareness about the literary communities across the country. Perhaps a one hundred venue tour across the country that celebrate the local. Bruno Saskatchewan here I come! 

 

10 Questions for 10th Anniversary of the Festival - Max-Tell

posted Jul 29, 2013, 3:19 PM by Natasha Boskic   [ updated Aug 15, 2013, 4:41 PM ]

Max Tell
Max Tell


P.C.: What is your favourite word?           
M.T.: Flocci-nauci-nihili-pili-ficators, those whose actions or habits (and therefore thoughts and utterances) are estimated as worthless.
 
P.C.: When and where are you happiest?              
M.T.: When I'm writing or see delight in my young audience's eyes.
 
P.C.: What is a poem you might carry in your pocket?         
M.T.: The Highwayman Came Riding.
 
P.C.: If you were an animal, what would you be?                  
M.T.: A Koala bear.
 
P.C.: What is your favourite memory from childhood?          
M.T.: Sitting on my grandfather's knee.
 
P.C.: What is your greatest fear?             
M.T.: That I will forget my lines.
 
P.C.: What is your most unappealing habit?          
M.T.: Some days, I get so wrapped up in my writing, I forget to shave or take a bath.
 
P.C.: What is your most favoured place to write?                  
M.T.: Sitting in my leather chair.
 
P.C.: What books are on your nightstand?             
M.T.: A few books by Shel Silverstein's and Jack Prelutsky's .
 
P.C.: What do you eat on a bad day?      
M.T.: A chocolate bar.
 
P.C.: Would you read an Ebook? Why?                  
M.T.: If I had one. I'll read anything.
 

P.C.: What do you always carry with you?             
M.T.: My imagination.
 
P.C.: Do you play a musical instrument? Have you ever?                  
M.T.: Guitar.
 
P.C.: If you are looking for inspiration in Vancouver where will you go?         
M.T.: I drive my car and listen to CBC.
 

P.C.: What poem/song do you wish you had written?          
M.T.: In Flanders Field.
 
PC: What is one thing you will not eat?                 
M.T.: Turnip.
 
P.C.: If you were not a writer what would you be doing instead?       
M.T.: A preschool teacher.
 
P.C.: If there was a song about your life, what would the title be?      
M.T.: Born Upon a Shelf - I've already written it.
 
P.C.: What keeps you awake at night?   
M.T.: Ideas for poems or songs.
 
P.C.: What is your motto?           
M.T.: I'm the chief of my tribe: If I do not hunt and hunt well, my tribe suffers.
 
P.C.: What are you currently working on?               
M.T.: A song, Mr. Weird Beard
 

Wanda Nowicki To Headline 2013 Main Event August 24

posted Jul 25, 2013, 11:06 AM by Steve Duncan

Due to unforseen circumstances, scheduled Mainstage musical Act The Madman's Gospel Band was forced to cancel this year's appearance. 

The Summer Dreams Literary Arts Festival is proud to announce that the always effervescent Wanda Nowicki has generously agreed to step in and grace our stage with her talents. 

To learn about Wanda, be sure to check out her website at http://www.wandanowicki.com/, then come see her perform live at Trout Lake!

Last Year's Fest Gets Rave Reviews

posted Jul 25, 2013, 10:51 AM by Steve Duncan

Thanks to Liisa Hannus for being a part of the festival and giving us this great review: http://vancouverisawesome.com/2012/08/21/summer-dreams-literary-arts-festival-august-24-25/

10 Questions for 10th Anniversary of the Festival - James McCann

posted Jul 17, 2013, 6:32 PM by Natasha Boskic   [ updated Aug 15, 2013, 4:42 PM ]

James McCann
James McCann


P.C.: If you were an animal, what would you be?
J.M.: If I were an animal, I'd want to be a wolf. They've always amazed and inspired me.

P.C.What is your greatest fear?
J.M.: I have extreme anxiety over open closet doors at night. If the closet door is open, I just cannot sleep.

P.C.What books are on your nightstand?
J.M.: The books on my nightstand are Redshirts, by John Scalzi and Eye of Minds by James Dashner.

P.C.If you are looking for inspiration in Vancouver where will you go?
J.M.: I like to travel to places that are quiet and surrounded by natural wonder. One of my most recent finds is the walk around Steveston, by the water, with birds and other creatures scurrying about.

P.C.: What book do you wish you had written?
J.M.: The book I wish I had written is I Am Legend by Richard Matheson. It's inspiring and I read it every year. A more recent title would be World War Z - after all, Manitoba is featured!

P.C.: What is one thing you will not eat?
J.M.: Kimchi.

P.C.: If you were not a writer what would you be doing instead?
J.M.: After high school, I trained as a mechanic. I also trained as an actor, a dog groomer, a security officer, and I worked on a construction site for a short time. If not for writing, I'd probably be a drifter having many adventures.

P.C.: If there was a song about your life, what would the title be?
J.M.: "Believe It or Not" by Joey Scarbury is my theme song in life. Always has been.

P.C.: What is your motto?
J.M.: My current two favourites are: "Let go of those things you cannot control" and "Be more dog."

P.C.: What are you currently working on?
J.M.: Right now, I'm working on my first middle grade novel - and it's comedy!

2013 Award Winners and Summer Dreams schedule announced

posted Feb 6, 2013, 11:06 PM by Pamela Bentley   [ updated Feb 6, 2013, 11:07 PM ]

Pandora's Collective is proud to announce the recipients of the Pandora's Literary Awards for 2013. This year's awards winners will be honoured at a special gala to be held on Friday, August 23th at CBC Studio 700 (700 Hamilton Street, Vancouver). The night will be hosted by Sean Cranbury and will feature a musical performance by  M’Girl . Award presenters include Wayde Compton, Evelyn Lau, Steven R. Duncan, Dennis E. Bolen, and Jillian Christmas. Harp Music by Amanda Hartley.

7:30 pm (Doors open at 7:00pm)

CBC Studio 700 (700 Hamilton St.)

FREE!!

Cash bar

Silent Auction (Cash Only)


The Pandora's Collective Distinctive Body of  Work Award is awarded annually in recognition of an author's literary achievements. This award is in recognition of his or her distinguished contribution to the literary community through their work and their example. This year's recipient is Joy Kogawa.


The Organizer/Promoter Award is given to an individual who has put themselves forward to help organize literary events, whether they are ongoing or special events, someone who has over the last year helped give space to many writers whether they are new or established. This year's recipient is Chris Gilpin.

 

Pandora’s Collective BC Writer Mentor *This award goes to an individual who has taken the time to help foster other writers, giving them feedback and support over and above what may be expected. This year's winner is Jen Currin

 

Our  Publisher's  Award goes to those publishers who keep getting the word out -- your words. Where would we be without the publishers? This year's winner is New Star Books.

 

Our Magazine Award goes to a magazine publisher who continues to support novice and established writers alike. This year, we are pleased to announce the recipient of this award is Ricepaper

 

And last but not least, our Citizenship Award  goes  to recognize an individual who Pandora’s Collective feels has excelled in their support of writers within our community. This year's recipient is Ariadne Sawyer.




More information about the award winners can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/summerdreamsfest/home/gala


Summer Dreams schedules can be found here:
https://sites.google.com/site/summerdreamsfest/full-festival-schedule-1

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