Organic fruit trees

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These are young peach trees in the Sonoran desert, all planted in January 2008 using organic gardening and water harvesting techniques:







July 2010: The peach trees on the left are watered with pure Sonoran desert well water. They have yet to mature and produce more than half a dozen peaches.

May 2010: The peach tree on the right was planted on the same property at the same time, but it has dense foliage, a thicker trunk and has produced hundreds of fruits. Why? From 2009 on, it has been watered with structured water ~ water that comes from the same neighbourhood well but is passed through a CN structuring device before it is piped to the trees in this garden.
(More info below)


Green thumb or...?

In July 2010 two friends and I visited TerraSante near Tucson, where a group of neighbours are all growing organic vegetables, herbs and fruits in their gardens under the same extreme desert weather and soil conditions.

Victoria White's gardens and fruit trees are abundant by any standard, and the trees in particular are quite a contrast to the neighbours' trees. While the trees in the neighbouring sites are very small (immature) and have produced almost no fruits to date, Victoria's trees are well developed and at a conservative estimate have produced hundreds (she and her neighbours all say "thousands") of peaches, nectarines, apricots and apples. Which makes sense: if each tree produces 200-300 fruits, multiplied by a dozen trees that yields 2400-3600 fruits.

Everybody notices the difference between the trees on the different sites. And they all speak of Victoria's 'green thumb'. But Victoria herself says: "What I have is structured water."


Structured water versus non-structured water
  • Below (and above) are photos taken in summer 2010 of fruit trees planted as bare root trees in January 2008 by Victoria and her neighbours. The trees all came from the same source, were planted at the same time in neighbouring plots of land with the same weather conditions. All the gardeners were aware of organic gardening techniques, like compost in the soil, mulch for the surface, and so on.
  • Victoria probably used far more generous portions of compost and other organic soil amendments than her neighbours. She describes bringing in compost, manure and worm droppings by the truckload. But according to Victoria, the major difference between the trees at her homestead and her neighbours' trees is that she uses only CN structured water for her trees. 
  • Is there any way to differentiate the effect of Victoria's green thumb and her copious organic soil improvements from the effect of structured water? Yes! Read on for more info and photos recording a startling difference among Victoria's own trees, a group of which are measurably smaller than the others.

Here are photos of Victoria's trees (structured well water) and her neighbours' trees (non-structured well water):


PHOTOS OF VICTORIA'S TREES  ~ click image to enlarge   (All photos on this page taken by Victoria White)
Watered from the same well that all the neighbours use, but with a water structuring unit attached
Apple trees, 7 June 2010


Apple tree, 7 June 2010

Nectarine tree, 7 June 2010



                   
              






                                                    
Nectarines, 7 June 2010






Nectarine trees, 7 June 2010












Peach tree, 21 May 2010



Victoria's comment on the difference between the trees:

I don’t think our neighbors got any other fruit besides the few peaches you can see in the pictures I sent you [below]. Besides our trees being bigger, they are thicker with leaves and obviously loaded down with fruit. The trunks are much bigger than our neighbors' trees, too.






PHOTOS OF THE NEIGHBOURS' TREES  (Click on the image to enlarge)
Watered with non-structured pure well water


Neighbours' apple tree in foreground, July 2010

   Neighbours' apricot and peach or nectarine, July 2010

  Neighbours' peach tree, July 2010



Neighbours' peach trees, July 2010







                          
                  



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CONTACT US
Questions? Comments?
      • Victoria can be reached at 520.325.3400 (M-F 10am-5pm AZ time)
      • We can also be reached by email: victoria@cnswater.com

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