This page is no longer updated. For the photos and article, please go to the Night Photography page at my new website location:
Night Photography
Physics to Photos by Steph Abegg

Colorful winter night at Elfin Lakes Hut, Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC.
(9 min, f 9.0, ISO 200)

Email me (Steph) if you are interested in purchasing any of my night photography.


Introduction

A night scene is one of the most rewarding and unique photographic subjects. A photograph taken at night can unveil subtle colors and impart an ambiance absent in any daytime exposure of the scene, or capture astronomical phenomena realized only upon an extended exposure. A candle becomes a glowing beacon in a warmly lit room; stars become colorful streaks through an inky sky; a dimly moonlit mountain becomes blanketed with glowing light and deep shadows.

Night photography has become one of my favorite forms of photography. My skills have been entirely self-taught, developed through countless sleepless nights fiddling with my camera under a blanket of stars. This page gives a sampling of some of my favorite night photos.

Night photography requires a good understanding of camera exposure and use of long exposure times. Understanding the simple physics of photography opens up a realm of new possibilities for the night photographer (or any photographer, for that matter). So, before the photos on this page, I discuss some of the technical aspects of night photography, such as what manual exposure settings to use and how exposure works. In addition, all photos on this page are accompanied by their exposure settings. To jump past this discussion and go directly to the photos, click the link below.



GO STRAIGHT TO THE PHOTOS
(which are below the following technical discussion)
Artificial Lighting
Stars
Moon
Colors in Night Sky



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This page is no longer updated. For the photos and article, please go to the Night Photography page at my new website location:








































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