2011 Conference

SRFIDC 32nd Sharing Conference

Auburn University
March 25-29, 2011

Conference Info

The year's conference will mark the 32nd anniversary of the SRFIDC. The conference will be hosted by Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. http://www.auburn.edu/
 
Conference Theme: Reflecting on the Past, Building for the Future.
Reflecting back on America's past can provide inspiration for future growth and development.  Our work with faculty and students in higher education should be grounded in knowledge of where we have come as a society and paths yet traveled.  This knowledge can provide a foundation upon which to build new teaching structures to advance learning and social justice.  This year's conference will focus on our roles in expanding access to learning through effective teaching, faculty, and organizational development activities.
 
About Auburn: Auburn University was established in 1856 as the East Alabama Male College, 20 years after the city of Auburn's founding. After December of 1859, it was maintained by the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The citizens of Auburn, the college faculty and the Methodist Church were all advocates of the new college. In 1859, Auburn's patrons erected and equipped a four-story building at the cost of $1,100 and opened its doors on October 1 to 80 students, six faculty members and a preparatory enrollment of 100. Five students were graduated after the first year. Closed by the Civil War in 1861, the economically troubled institution reopened in 1866 and struggled for the next six years. In 1872, the institution's economic problems were resolved when, under the Morrill Act, Auburn became the first land-grant college in the South and was renamed the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. During the next several years, the school experienced changes that are still prevalent on campus: Fraternities were formed in 1878 and in 1892, Auburn admitted its first women and organized its first football team. In 1899 the name again was changed to the Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Expansion continued, and in 1960, the name of the school was changed toAuburn University, a title more in keeping with its location and expressing the varied academic programs and larger curriculum of a major university. Current enrollment numbers around 24,000 students and Auburn University offers degrees in 13 schools and colleges at the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels.

SRFIDC 2011 Agenda (PDF)
SRFIDC 2011 Flyer

Directions:

The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center

From Montgomery:
Take I-85 North towards Auburn. Travel approximately 49 miles, and take Exit 51 (Auburn). At the end of the ramp, make a left onto College Street. Go approximately 3.5 miles. The hotel is located on the right-hand side of the street, directly across from Draughon Library.
From Birmingham:
Take US Highway 280 East approximately 110 miles. Make a right onto Highway 147, and follow it five miles to Auburn. The hotel is located on the left, directly across from Draughon Library.
From Atlanta and Atlanta Hartsfield Airport:
Take I-85 South towards Montgomery. Travel approximately 103 miles, and take Exit 51 (Auburn). At the end of the ramp, bear right onto College Street. Travel another 3.5 miles. The Hotel is located on the right side of the street, directly across from Draughon Library.

 

 

 
Agenda
 
Friday
March 25
Auburn University Hotel & Conference Center, Auburn, Alabama http://www.auhcc.com

12:00-3:00

Conference Registration

3:00- 5:30
Governor's Room

Pre-conference Workshop:  The Culture Bump® Experience
Something extraordinary happens when people step beyond diversity… Imagine learning to use any difference you may encounter as a way to connect with others? This engaging and interactive introduction to the Culture Bump Approach will immerse participants in self-reflective, nonthreatening simulations and activities designed to transform your own “culture bumps” into authentic relationships. The change mechanism offered by Culture Bump theory will offer you a process to negotiate new insights into your own character or culture and explore with others beyond the “why” we are different and discover “how” we are the same. The Auburn University Biggio Center offers this unique workshop facilitated by the originator of Culture Bump theory, Dr. Carol Archer and her cofacilitator, Dr. Stacey Nickson.

5:30-6:30

Conference planning committee meeting (Ariccia - on your own)

6:30-8:00

Dinner on your own (List of options provided)

8:00-Until?

Nightly: SRFIDC Lounge AU Hotel Presidential Suite (3rd Floor)

Saturday
March 26

8:00-5:00











*Breakfast Buffet at Ariccia (included daily in special hotel conference rate)

Civil Rights Bus Tour (make check payable to SRFIDC):
Biggio Civil Rights Tour 2011
Montgomery (Southern Poverty Law Center Civil Rights Memorial & Center, Rosa Park Museum, Dexter Ave. King Memorial Baptist Church, Lunch at Dreamland BBQ); Tuskegee University (Tuskegee Airmen’s National Historic site, George Washington Carver Museum, Booker T. Washington’s gravesite)

Docent: Dr. Paulette Dilworth

Lunch at Dreamland BBQ, Montgomery (On your own)

6:00-8:00

Dinner on own(List of option provided)

8:00-Until?

SRFIDC Lounge

Sunday
March 27

All sessions will be held in Auburn University Hotel & Conference Center

7:00-8:00

Breakfast Buffet at Ariccia

8:00-12:00

Registration for Sunday Arrivals

8:00-8:50
Ballroom B (BRB)

Learning and Teaching with Digital Freebies to Engage the 21st Century Learners
Danilo M. Baylen University of West Georgia Abstract Presentation demonstrates several free web-based/digital tools and applications that faculty members need to know to engage students. Examples on how these tools and applications can be integrated into one’s teaching will be discussed.

9:00-9:50
Ballroom B (BRB)

Understanding the Learning Process as the Foundation to Better Teaching
Michele DiPietro
Kennesaw State University
Abstract
A tenet of learner-centered teaching is that learning is the litmus test of any pedagogy. Therefore, one of the most important contributions educational developers can offer instructors is to help them understand how learning works. The presenter’s new book synthesizes 50 years of research on learning from the cognitive, motivational, and developmental perspectives into seven integrated principles. In this workshop, we’ll explore some highlights from the seven principles, using experiential activities that participants can reuse in workshops on their campus to enrich their training programs.

10:00-10:50
Ballroom B (BRB)

Templates As a Structure for Open Collaboration: A Story in Three Acts
Diane E. Boyd, Jane Love, & Mike Winiski Furman University
Prior To Session Investigate Pecha Kucha in order to prepare to participate fully during this workshop
http://mikewiniski.com/blog/?p=181
Abstract
In this interactive session we share three templates for teaching and faculty development: They Say, I Say, VoiceThread response templates, and a design process to facilitate faculty reflective conversations. Participants will explore the creative potential of templates they already use and/or identify new generative structures for their work.

11:00-11:50
Ballroom B (BRB)

From Chalk Slates to the iPad: Teaching with Tablets
Ginger Durham
Board of Regents University System of Georgia
Abstract
The session will explore using the iPad instructionally in higher education. New applications continue to emerge which can be applied to learning and technology needs in the classroom and in faculty development. Examples of applications and their potential use with faculty and students will be showcased.

11:45-1:15

Lunch at Governors Room (provided by SRFIDC)

1:15-2:30
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Conference Welcome and Sharing Activity: Bring a handout of one unique and effective faculty development activity from your institution.

2:30-3:20
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Small Grant Writing and How It Can Transform Your Department
Christopher Shaffer, & Amanda Major
Troy University
Abstract
Pursuit and implementation of small grants can have a transformative impact on a community's perception of an academic institution as well as its overall culture. This presentation will focus on a variety of successful small grants. It will also provide insight on how to not only locate grant opportunities, but decide what opportunities are best for individual institutions. Among grant making organizations that will be examined are: The Alabama Humanities Foundation (AHF), The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Target Corporation and several other corporations that provide grants for educational causes.

3:30-4:20
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Using Web 2.0 Tools to Transform Higher Education
Jeanne Sewell, Flor Culpa-Bondal, & Martha Colvin
Georgia College and State University
Abstract
This presentation shares results from research that sought to understand how students and faculty use the interactive web (web 2.0) for their personal and professional lives. The research questions that guided the study were as follows: (1) What are the current uses of Web 2.0 tools by nursing students and nursing faculty? (2) What is the value of Web 2.0 tools to the scholarship of teaching and learning? This data will provide basis for the design of specific curricula and educational classes in the use of technology for healthcare purposes.

6:00-8:00


NIGHT ON THE TOWN Dinner
at Zazu Gastropub (2 Blocks from AU Hotel)
A full menu and bar will be available. Participants will pay on their own at the restaurant. Group will meet in hotel lobby at 5:30 to walk two blocks to restaurant.

8:00-Until?

SRFIDC Lounge

Monday March 28

All sessions will be held in Auburn University Hotel & Conference Center

7:00-8:00

Breakfast Buffet at Ariccia

8:00-8:50
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Inclusive Teaching for Our Queer Students
Michele DiPietro
Kennesaw State University
Abstract
This is not a generic workshop on heterosexism and homophobia. Rather, it challenges participants to understand the issues queer students face and how they impact their classroom performance and to develop attitudes and behaviors to make classes inclusive. The workshop balances cognitive and affective components, starting with identity development models as means of understanding our students and continuing with a guided journey to bring relevant emotions out on the table. We will then reconsider teaching methods and content through brainstorming and student quotes, and generate strategies. Geared to developers and instructors alike. Several handouts and annotated bibliography provided.

9:00-9:50
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Reflecting on Advising as Scholarly Teaching in Order to Build Future Practices Leading to Optimal Student Development
Don Mulvaney
Auburn University
Abstract
Higher education is challenged to improve student retention and success beyond graduation. While formal academic curricula and teaching practice play a large role in the latter, multiple practices outside the formal classroom contribute to the creation of optimal conditions for student development, including faculty advising. Creation of formal extracurricular components within the advising program, including orchestrated events, is crucial to development of professional skills of undergraduate students. In this highly engaged session, participants will: 1) explore an evolving case study of a student development advising framework for Animal Science majors rooted in student development theory 2) gain insights into innovative and effective practices used in various advising contexts which are helpful in creating environments aligned with generalized student development outcomes, and 3) be able to customize advising approaches that are tailored for individual faculty and provide faculty opportunity to explore scholarship around the practice of advising. While teaching center programs oftentimes focus on formal classroom activities, this session will reflect on traditional practices and explore future paradigms for advising as important components of effective teaching and learning.

10:00-10:50
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Powering the Move to Lecture Capture Stella Smith, Gautam Saha, and Stephanie Whittington
Georgia Gwinnett College
Abstract
This presentation will discuss the initial pilot and growth of the Echo 360 Lecture Capture tool at GA Gwinnett College. We will begin with a brief description of the product then move on to the issues we faced in piloting this new technology on the campus. Growing pains and incorporation into the hybrid program model as well as past usage and its effect on the continued growth of the users will be discussed. Possible mashup with other technologies will be highlighted. This presentation is intended for higher education administrators, instructors, and technology specialists.

11:00-11:50
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Screencasting: Spice for Online Courses and Invaluable Faculty Development Tool Kevin Yee
University of Central Florida
Abstract
Screencasting refers to capturing the action on the computer screen, to be displayed on web pages or inside an LMS as a video. Variations also include narrated PowerPoint lectures converted to Flash video. Several free tools (Jing, iSpring, and AuthorPoint Lite) are available, and many are highly adaptable for use in faculty development.

11:45-1:00
Ballroom
A-Left

Lunch (provided by Biggio Center)
T-Shirt Exchange: A long-standing tradition for us: bring a T-shirt from your institution.

1:00-1:50
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Concurrent Session

Discovering the Wisdom of the Wiki Way: Teaching, Assessment, Learning and Engagement
Danilo M. Baylen
University of West Georgia
Abstract
Session will describe, discuss, and demonstrate how wiki technology can help prepare students for the demands of the 21st century classroom and work place. Given this context, the presentation will discuss varied teaching and learning strategies including peer review, collaboration, and content development in meeting curricular expectations in a rapidly changing tech-nology-rich environment. Examples of student-generated projects will be shown as demonstrations to what faculty members can do in their classrooms. Also, assessment ideas and strategies will be shared on how wikisupported activities can be better integrated in student-produced projects. Finally, the presenter will engage the audience in discussing issues and challenges in assisting faculty to integrate this technology in their teaching practices.

1:00-1:50
Governor's Room

Concurrent Session

A Learning Cycle Approach to Guided Inquiry Erin K. H. Saitta
University of Central Florida
Abstract
The word inquiry refers to the way scientists study and explain the world around them as well as to the activities in which students partake to develop knowledge and understanding in science (National Research Council, 2000). Although science education reforms have been pushing for a more inquiry based approach to teaching and learning science, lectures are continually being used to convey science content. One reason for this may lie in the fact that implementing a reform based curriculum requires a change in one’s ideas about teaching and learning of the subject itself.

2:00-2:50
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Concurrent Session

The Seventh Dimension: Dynamic Frameworks for Thinking about the Future of Faculty Development
Sue Grider, and Laura Cruz
Western Carolina University
Abstract
This session is directed toward the faculty development community and their efforts to deliver innovative faculty development across a wide variety of disciplines. As changing faculty roles contribute to the demise of the workshop model, we are scrambling to find new alternatives, paradigms, and frameworks from which to promote successful development strategies. This workshop focuses on one prism for reconsidering the faculty development paradigm, the Seven Dimensions of Teaching (Arreola, 1994). Using interactive activities, we will provide inspiration and ideas on how to re-conceptualize faculty development in light of differentiated institutional missions, new student populations, and changing pedagogical landscapes.

2:00-2:50
Governor's Room

Concurrent Session

If It Isn’t Fixed, Break It!
Jennifer Rollins, and Dan Godwin
West End High School
Abstract
"Educators on average are losing 5-9 hours a week on lower-level discipline challenges. Low-level disruptions are stealing precious instruction time. Academics and discipline go hand in hand. You can be the best content instructor, but without the ability to control the classroom the best lessons remain undelivered. Participants will learn how to avoid the "debate bait" and how to eliminate warnings and multiple requests. Participants will learn how to increase academics, decrease discipline challenges, gain parent support, and empower all educators. Participants will be encouraged and challenged to implement strategies and techniques that will change the classroom and campus climate immediately. Educators have reported a 70 percent and more success rate in reducing discipline using these techniques and strategies.

3:00-3:50
Ballroom B
(BRB)

Interdisciplinary Teaching and Research Today and Beyond: Assessment of Pros, Cons, and Strategies for Success
Chandra Austin, and Ken Thomas
Auburn University
Abstract
Recently academic institutions have been trying to develop more unique ways to promote well-roundedness within their students. One way that is becoming increasingly popular is through interdisciplinary scholarship. This concept of interdisciplinary work is a fairly new endeavor that hinges upon existing and traditional studies that once combines presents a new challenge, in terms of way of thinking, to students. The uniqueness of this area, however, comes in that its mastery requires a totally different approach to conventional disciplinary specific teaching and research. Despite the theoretical framework that makes for the propagation or interdisciplinary work in academia, there are several challenges that the interdisciplinary approach faces. This session will highlight, through the use of examples of interdisciplinary scholarship at Auburn University, models for interdisciplinary teaching and an assessment of the pros, cons and lessons learned. Participants in this session would undertake a group activity that demonstrates the core issues that need to be worked out before staring an undergraduate interdisciplinary course.

4:30

Guided Walking tour of Campus and Biggio Center

6:00

Dinner on your own. (List of options provided)

8:00-Until?

SRFIDC Lounge

Tuesday March 29

Check out (by 11:00 AM)

7:00-9:00

Breakfast Buffet at Ariccia

9:15-10:30

Business Meeting (BRB)

10:30-11:20
Ballroom B
(BRB)

The Reflective Practice: From Faculty Development to Enrichment
Chris Stabile
Keiser University
Abstract
Faculty development should focus on faculty enrichment. This concept entails a reflective and positive approach to teaching. Through encouragement of the reflective practice, a faculty developer could focus sessions and their program from teaching to learning. Through collaboration, a faculty developer could become the "chief learning officer" on the campus to promote learning, such as learning how to learn about teaching methods. By facilitating faculty through the reflective process--- reflect in action, on action and for action promotes buy-in of student learning.

11:20-12:30
Ballroom B
(BRB)

The Best of Both Worlds-Effectively Using Blended Learning
Elaine Plemons
Southern Adventist University
Abstract
Learn how to incorporate the best of Blended Learning research. This session focuses on 7 keys for effective Blended Learning design. Using a flow chart, each key is discussed with practical examples from a variety of disciplines to maximize student engagement, and increase learning. Learn how to engage students prior to class, how to make the most of inclass time, and ways to extend the learning. Handouts will include a summary of the research and practical solutions to common problems associated with Blended Learning design. The session is intended for instructional designers, faculty, and other faculty support professionals.

12:30-1:45

Executive Committee Meeting & Lunch Ariccia (on own)

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