Sugar Cane






By: Ali Mintz
sug·ar·cane
noun
a tall grass, Saccharum officinarum, of tropical and warm regions,having a stout, jointed stalk, and constituting the chief source of sugar.

There are 37 different species of sugar cane. Sugar cane takes about 6 to 12 months depending on the location and can grow anywhere from 6 to 19 feet tall. Their stout stalks are rich in sugar, which is used to make table sugar, falernum, rum, molasses, ethanol, and cachaca (a traditional spirit from Brazil). 

Sugar Cane Questions

1. WHERE DID SUGAR CANE COME FROM?

Sugarcane is grown in most warm climates. Some of these places are Hawaii, California Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Peru, the Philippines, Pakistan, and so many other warm countries. Around 1420 the Portuguese introduced sugar cane to Madeira where it reached West Africa and the Canary Islands. In 1493 on Christopher Columbus's second voyage Columbus transported sugar cane from the Canary Islands to what is now the Dominican Republic. Then, in the 1520's sugar cane was taken to Central and South America and after it was taken to the British and French West Indies. 

2. WHAT CAN WE USE SUGAR CANE FOR?
  • table sugar
  • rum (alcoholic beverage)
  • molasses 
  • ethanol (fuel source)
  • bagasse (fuel source) 
3. WHAT IMPACT HAS SUGAR CANE HAD ON THE WORLD?
Sugar cane has had a large impact on the world. Sugar cane in the 1500's changed trade in a huge way. It made trade increase throughout the Canary Islands and and South America. Everyone wanted sugar back in those days to go with their new found obsession for tea. Huge plantations spread to everywhere on the western hemisphere including Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. Sugar cane is one of the most grown plants in the world today.

Hand Harvesting Sugar Cane




http://www.kew.org/plant-cultures/plants/sugar_cane_history.html
http://www.youtube.com/
http://dictionary.reference.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugarcane
http://daphne.palomar.edu/scrout/sugar.htm



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