Adapting books

 
   

      It is important for children with autism to have early exposure to literacy  (reading and writing) activities. It can be beneficial to use books that are interactive. For best results books should be about something your child is interested in and can relate to. If the child is interested they will be motivated.  Repetition is key; reading the books over and over again reinforces learning.  These activities can help children to develop their communication abilities. Below are examples of how interactive literacy activities can be created

 

 

Adapting a simple book for language acquisition and learning

 

 

     

This is a simple picture book paired print objects and pictures to make an engaging learning opportunity. This was used with a child who was learning to use picture supports for communication. Initially this was used as an errorless way to teach vocabulary and then later used to help determine their understanding.

  First, the book was read with the child, the pull off pictures introduced as we went through the book. The child was encouraged to put the symbol in the book as we read.

  Next the book was read, using the tactile object that matched the picture.  After reviewing this several times, the next step was to introduce two objects and ask the child to identify the one shown in the picture.  The child could show response by pointing to or picking up the correct object. We later introduced two pictures for one object and asked the child to identify what the object was using the picture symbol cards.

 

 

 

Printable Monkey Books

 

http://freeprintablefun.org/2010/07/monkeys-book-of-opposites.html

 

              Free printable books that are based on topics children with special needs often have difficulty with. Books can be printed out and put together; photos on the site model this. Manipulative materials that make the book interactive are included.

After printing out the book, the pages were put into page protectors in a binder purchased from the dollar store. I laminated pictures that were supplied with the book with clear contact paper and cut them out. I next printed the picture symbols for the book ( found on my downloads page https://sites.google.com/site/speaking4autism/home/tools-for-literacy/downloads) and laminated those with the contact paper as well. I then added Velcro spots onto the pages in the binder to allow pictures to be used interactively while reading the story with the child

 

 
 
 
 
 
Adapted Books
NYC Department of Education
 
This site has printable books adapted in PowerPoint, and picture symbols for vocabulary building.
 
Comments