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Fit for space - Kilve 2014

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This May the first of the two spring and summer 'Fit For Space'  courses ran at Kilve Court, With a mix of science, maths and experiments the course provided an insight into astronaut training as well as providing key links with the national curriculum.

Fit For Space - Kilve court 2014


The course covered.


  • The cardiovascular system.
  • Digestion and Enzymes, 
  • Fitness types
  • Nutrition and disease
  • Flight mechanics
  • Effects of space
  • Surviving in space


Student online presentations.

Each student chose a topic to talk about in a presentation and only had a very short time to prepare below are the unedited texts that they based their presentations on.

Daniel - Heart

Completely focussed  Studying how stress affects performance and heart rate using an ECG and tring to land the simulator at Kennedy Space Centre.  Space Explorers Academy provides hands-on science, technology, electronics and programming courses for gifted and talented and enrichment students.   spaceexplorers.co.uk Educational activities available at Kilve court and Leeson House

As you probably know, the heart is the most important part of the body, without it you would be very much DEAD! The average heartbeat in adults whilst resting is 60-70 beats per minute,\ but when exercising  the beats per minute will increase to keep up with the amount of oxygen needed by the muscles.  Also you breathing will become more rapid to increase your intake of oxygen.

 

There are machines that can measure your heartbeat or the electrical signal sent to it, which creates a graph of the information. The machine can say that you’re dead but sometimes it’s wrong. You have a few seconds to find out.

 

 

Jack and Ben - Vacuum

We will show the adults what happens when the air gets sucked out and the air pressure is lower. Steve (The evil egg ) will get bigger. You will be fine if you have shelter (a space suit) but if there is even a small hole then the pressure will make you leak blood. 

Editor: I couldn't find your video of Steve the Evil Egg, but I did find the video of Bob the Indifferent Marshmallow  (representing lungs in vacuum)  and have put him at the end of this video.



Fit for space?



 

 

Jack and Ben - Long term effects of space.

You lose 20-40% of muscle a month and 2%of bone mass When you come back to earth it will be hard for you to walk and if you fall, there will be more damage than normal.

 


Jack and Ben (take 2???) -  Vacuum and fitness

In space there is no pressure pushing in on anything, so the pressure inside of something pushes out as normal sometimes it expands and if there is a hole of any size in the spacesuit all of the stuff inside will be pushed out. The only way to stop this is to have thick and hard layers over your skin.

 

studying effects of fatigue on coordination ..... well there had to be a winning team!  Pupils studying how astronauts train and avoid the long term affects of space flight ..... Measuring pulse and recovery rate on the data watch.  Space Explorers Academy provides hands-on science, technology, electronics and programming courses for gifted and talented and enrichment students.   spaceexplorers.co.uk Educational activities available at Kilve court and Leeson House

As well as vacuum there are long term problems as well. So when you go to space you need to go to the gym because you lose 20-40% of your muscle mass in a month, you will also need a lot of core muscle because you need to be able to spin, pitch and roll whilst in the air. You also need to keep fit because when you are back on earth you can’t really walk that well.

 







Louis - Getting into orbit.

Space flight simulator, orbital mechanics and physics.    Space Explorers Academy provides hands-on science, technology, electronics and programming courses for gifted and talented and enrichment students.   spaceexplorers.co.uk Educational activities available at Kilve court and Leeson House

We learned a lot of things from the simulator such as the future of space travel with a jet-ish shuttle. We also learnt how to get into orbit, how not to crash and how to take off and get into space.

 

To get into orbit we had to take off and get up to 50 degrees until we reached 30Km where we switched off our aileron flaps for steering and switched on our RCS thrusters to steer.

 After that , when we our apoapsis was at 300km, we shut ff our main engine. When we are on either our apoapsis (furthest from the earth) or periapsis (closest to the earth) we can prograde or retrograde burn to change the shape of our orbit.

 



Tom -  Exercise

Agility training  Pupils studying how astronauts train and avoid the long term affects of space flight ..... Measuring pulse and recovery rate on the data watch.  Space Explorers Academy provides hands-on science, technology, electronics and programming courses for gifted and talented and enrichment students.   spaceexplorers.co.uk Educational activities available at Kilve court and Leeson House

A topic we have been working on is exercise. Astronauts exercise at least 2 1/2 hours a day 6 days a week.

 

There are two types of exercise that astronauts focus on. They are called aerobic and anaerobic. These include the plank, crunches and the beep test. The plank is where you lie on your elbows and feet and stay there as long as you can. The beep test we used was not for school but the Australian police force, this is what it sounds like.

The gadget spec URL could not be found




Sophie – spacesuit cooling

Testing the cooling suit in space suit science  Space Explorers Academy provides hands-on science, technology, electronics and programming courses for gifted and talented and enrichment students.   spaceexplorers.co.uk Educational activities available at Kilve court and Leeson House

One of the topics we covered was the cooling system in a space suit. We tried on a cooling system which works by pumping the water around pipes attached to a jacket. Amazingly it works!

 If you didn’t have a cooling system then you would either freeze or fry to death.

They also use a fairly thin type of reflective material in the suits which protects you from radiation.






ECG measurements 

Below I have put a copy of everybody's ECG print outs.... can you guess who has which one and who is the fittest.

They were taken during the shuttle simulation landing at Kennedy Space Centre to measure the effects of stress and fitness on performance.


 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Ć
beeptest.mp3
(3911k)
John Winder,
29 May 2014, 01:44
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