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Personality Disorders

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Personality disorder (Wiki)   

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personality_disorder    

    "Personality disorders are a class of mental disorders characterised by enduring maladaptive patterns of behavior, cognition and inner experience, exhibited across many contexts and deviating markedly from those accepted by the individual's culture. These patterns develop early, are inflexible and are associated with significant distress or disability.[1] The definitions may vary some according to other sources.[2][3]


Personality disorders
Cluster A (odd)
Cluster B (dramatic)
Cluster C (anxious)
Not specified
    "Personality, defined psychologically, is the set of enduring behavioral and mental traits that distinguish human beings. Hence, personality disorders are defined by experiences and behaviors that differ from societal norms and expectations. Those diagnosed with a personality disorder may experience difficulties in cognition, emotiveness, interpersonal functioning or control of impulses. In general, personality disorders are diagnosed in 40–60 percent of psychiatric patients, making them the most frequent of all psychiatric diagnoses.[5]

    These behavioral patterns in personality disorders are typically associated with substantial disturbances in some behavioral tendencies of an individual, usually involving several areas of the personality, and are nearly always associated with considerable personal and social disruption. A person is classified as having a personality disorder if their abnormalities of behavior impair their social or occupational functioning. Additionally, personality disorders are inflexible and pervasive across many situations, due in large part to the fact that such behavior may be ego-syntonic (i.e. the patterns are consistent with the ego integrity of the individual) and are, therefore, perceived to be appropriate by that individual. This behavior can result in maladaptive coping skills, which may lead to personal problems that induce extreme anxiety, distress or depression.[6] These patterns of behavior typically are recognized in adolescence and the beginning of adulthood and, in some unusual instances, childhood.[1]"   *

**Contents   






MDF: Personality Disorders
160525 - 2237 


Subpages (1): Sadism
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