Satyendra Nath Bose
Higgs-Boson News

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The recent announcements about the possible discovery of the Higgs-Boson has created quite a stir and has renewed interest in Satyendra Nath Bose. The following are a collection of articles that have recently appeared. More articles will be posted as they are found.

Satyendra Nath Bose: About the God of Particles, IBN Live, July 5, 2012

New Delhi: Satyendra Nath Bose was born on New Year's Day, 1894, in Calcutta to Surendra Nath Bose, an engineer with the East Indian Railway Company. The eldest among seven siblings, Satyendra Nath Bose, attended Hindu School, a school that had made notable contributions to the Bengal Renaissance and the Reformation movement.

He made a name for himself for his mathematical prowess and his love for science. Bose, as a student at the vaunted Presidency College, Calcutta, went on to secure the highest marks in every discipline (a few of them remains unbroken even now). Meghnad Saha, his classmate and another celebrated Indian nuclear scientist after whom the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics is named, came a close second.



Satyendra Nath Bose: The God Particle's neglected namesake, Zeenews.com, July 5, 2012

In the territory of science, they say, nothing can be designated the rock-solid status of a ‘theory’. Hypotheses are all that anybody can think of, and today’s established theory might be shown the door tomorrow. The field is diverse, researches unending, and discoveries incessant and earth-shattering.


Patriotic Particles, The Daily Beast, Newsweek, July 9, 2012

Invisible Man: While most of the world was giddy with geeky joy over the discovery of the Higgs boson—or “God particle”—India reacted like a bride jilted at the altar. “Scientists from India seldom get their due,” sulked one headline in a Delhi daily, highlighting the fact that in all the celebration of Peter Higgs’s research, scant credit was accorded to Satyendra Nath Bose, a Bengali physicist who worked with Albert Einstein in the 1920s.




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