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Good and Bad Lighting

Examples of Good and Bad Lighting Practices in Adelaide

Adelaide like most cities around the world has a range of good, bad and everything-in-between outdoor lighting. While street lighting has gradually improved due to evolving Australian Standards most commercial lighting is left to "self-regulation" and is rarely monitored. This allows buyers to fall for cheap and  inefficient lighting fixtures that are often mounted and aimed without consideration for the amenity of the district. Glarey lighting does not necessarily increase safety and can create a motoring hazard, disturbing sleep and in some cases can actually increase criminal activity. Bad lighting wastes light thereby wastes energy adding unnecessary atmospheric emissions and costs more in the long term. Good lights control the beam and are aimed at the target area. This improves general night time visibility and safety and promotes amenity, and in the long term saves energy and money.


 Fair
While the refractor (lens) on this HPS lamp was designed for wide road coverage it still emits glarey sidelight that dazzles motorists. West Lakes Blvd.
 Good 
Similar HPS lamps with flat "lens" at Sir Donald Bradman Drive emit all light downward creating a well illuminated and minimum-glare roadway.

 Bad
This outdated and inefficient 80 watt "flower-pot" mercury street lamp emits considerable amount of side-light and up-light creating a harsh glare adding to sky glow. They still pervade residential streets in Adelaide
 Better
This more efficient semi-cutoff  50 watt HPS street lamp is a better choice though some light still escapes uselessly sideways and forward

Bad
Cheap, inefficient and glarey metal halide lights in a Cheltenham car yard. These lights are aimed almost horizontally spilling light upwards and and dazzling motorists on Port Road.
 Good
Pooraka car yard uses quality full cut-off box lights that reduce glare and up-light. Creates a visually ambient environment that enhances the look of the sales stock.


Bad

Theses luminaires are typically found at commercial car yards, sports grounds and warehouse security.

Only the lower portion of the beam reaches the traget while the remainder (about 40%) escapes sideways and upward adding to glare and sky glow,  and running costs as well as emissions from wasted energy.




     Bad
Left: This unshielded flood light at a corner car sales yard emits glarey light far beyond the confines of the business premises, wasting light and...Right: forcing residents across the road to install heavy duty window shutters. This kind of light pollution detracts from amenity and can easily be remedied with a quality full-cutoff floods and after-hours curfew.

 Bad
Billboard illuminated from below loses light skyward wasting energy and adding to sky-glow
 Better
Down-lights aesthetically illuminate sign reducing glare and up-light

Bad
These prismatic globe lights at Charles Sturt
Council car park spray wasteful amounts of light sideways and upwards with poor utilization.
 Good
A better alternative is this excellent full-cutoff light  that sends all of its light downward with good utilization.

Very Bad!
No consideration was given to the aiming of this full-cutoff, forward-throw flood light mounted over a car park at Transport SA Port Adelaide. The light is incorrectly aimed so that and most of the light is wastefully beamed into the sky!
Good
Here is the correct positioning of forward-throw floods at Glenelg Oval car park. They are mounted horizontally as prescribed to throw light forward and downward.

 Very Bad!
This double-fluoro luminaire at a Port Adelaide warehouse has no shielding. Most of the light beams wastefully sideways and upward!
 Good
By contrast this Wingfield warehouse has installed a full cut-off luminaire that directs almost all of its light usefully downward to the property.

Bad
Unshielded post-top lanterns kill off old style charm emitting glarey sidelight and over-lighting at Port Adelaide.
Good
Shielded walkway lanterns at Semaphore foreshore avoid glare and keeps light levels to amenable levels while preserving utility.

Bad
Annoyed residents on an Adelaide foreshore are forced to attach shields to block out light from the offending side of the lantern that creates light trespass, lowered amenity and disturbing sleep.
more Bad
Here other residents attempt to paint out the offending side of the lamp or have the council insert a light baffle. Either solution is inadequate when more suitable lighting is available.

Bad
The light patterns on the wall reveal how these "Yarra Post-top" walkway lanterns allow considerable light to wastefully escape sideways and upwards. Location: Mawson Lakes.
Good
By contrast Adelaide City Council employs full cut-off light fixtures that aim all light down to efficiently illuminate pedestrian walkways along North Terrace.

 Good
Sport ground with tall full cut-off floods confines light
to play area preventing widespread light spill and glare that would otherwise afflict the neighbourhood.

 Good
Standard residential floodlight fitted with a home-made tin hood secured with a 10cm hose clamp. Avoids light trespass on to neighbouring properties.

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