Silvia Elena Piovan, PhD








"All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did."

T.E. Lawrence (Seven Pillars of Wisdom, 1922)








Researcher and Lecturer in Geography at the Department of Historical Geographical and Antiquity Sciences, University of Padova (Italy).

Aggregate Professor of “Cartography and GIS” for the Bachelor's Degree in History.

Instructor of:

  • GIS for Local Development” for the Master’s Degree in Local development (in English).
  • “History of Cartography and Use of Historical Maps in Geohistorical Reconstructions” for the 2nd Level Master Degree in GIScience and Unmanned System for the Integrated Management of the Territory and the Natural Resources.
  • “GIS” for the Doctorate Program in Historical, Geographical and Anthropological Studies.

Visiting Affiliate Professor at the University of South Carolina from February 2018.

Visiting Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina (February-May 2017, August-September 2016, February-May 2016, August-September 2015, February-May 2015).

Member of the Collegium in the Doctorate Program in Historical, Geographical and Anthropological Studies.

Member of the Steering Commettee of the Second Level Master Degree in GIScience and Unmanned System for the Integrated Management of the Territory and the Natural Resources.

Current research projects include:
  • Geo-historical evolution and interactions between hydrography and human activities in alluvial plains
  • Wetlands, floods and ecosystem services in the Adige-Po plain
  • The role of wetlands in South Carolina in relation to the military events of the American Civil War, the development and decline of water powered mills and mill ponds
  • Historical cartography and Geographical Information Sciences
  • Paleogeographic reconstructions
  • Stratigraphic architecture and geomorphology of alluvial plains
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