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Agronomy

posted Mar 4, 2011, 8:23 AM by rajesh gk

Title

The Impact of Optimum Dosages of Mineral in Various Combination on Larval Development and Silk Production of Bombyx mori L.

Authors

Muhammad Ashfaq ; M.A.Rehman ; Amjad Ali

Journal

Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences Year:2000, Volume:3, Issue:9, pages/rec.No:  1391-1392

Abstract

Optimum elements dosages i.e., 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.1%, 0.1%, 0.15% and 0.5% of various minerals i.e., N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Cu respectively in various combinations were studied on larval development and silk production of Bombyx mori L. The rearing of silkworm larvae was restricted to chopped tender and green mulberry leaves treated with different concentrations. The results revealed that mineral nutrients have not affected the yield component significantly but have also presented better food consumption, body weight, co- efficient of utilization and larval development as well. However, of all the test treatments T11 where the offered mulberry leaves were treated with 0.2% N + 0.3% K + 0.1% Ca + 0.1% P + 0.15% Mg + 0.5% Cu concentration gave the best results.

Citation

FULL TEXT

 

posted Jul 9, 2010, 9:23 AM by rajesh gk

Title

Sinusoidal magnetic fields and chawki (silkworm) rearing in sericulture.

Authors

Qadri SM, Dhahira Beevi N, Mani A, Leelapriya T, Dhilip KS, Sanker Narayan PV.

Regional Sericultural Research Station, CSB, Govt. of India, Salem, Tamil Nadu, India.

Journal

Electromagn Biol Med. 2006;25(3):145-53.

Abstract

Effects of sinusoidal magnetic fields on chawki silkworm rearing have been studied. The experiment was conducted using a multi X Bi silkworm hybrid, PM x CSR 2. Disease-free layings were reared from hatching to cocooning and by subjecting first and second instar to three magnetic field frequencies: 0.1, 1.0, and 10 Hz at 1500 nT, pp, for six days at six hours per day. Controls were maintained simultaneously. Larval durations for both young-stage chawki (I and II) and late stage (III, IV, V) were calculated in days and hours, including the feeding and moulting periods for I to IV instars, and the feeding period for V instar up to the time of spinning. The study revealed that the magnetic exposures reduced both feeding and moulting times with no adverse effects on larval growth. The substantial reductions in time, 33 hours in instars I and II, and 64 hours in total larval duration, could be commercially important in chawki rearing, saving time, leaf consumption, and labor expenses.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16954117 PMID: 16954117 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

Title

[Influence of mulberry cultivars Morus spp. on the production and quality of silkworm Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) cocoons]

[Article in Portuguese] Free Article

Authors

Meneguim AM, Lovato L, da Silva RZ, Yamaoka RS, Nagashima GT, Pasini A.

Instituto Agronómico do Paraná, Londrina, PR, 86001-970.

Journal

Neotrop Entomol. 2007 Sep-Oct;36(5):670-4.

Abstract

The success of sericiculture greatly depends on the availability of mulberry cultivars with agronomic characteristics that maximize the production and quality of silkworm, Bombyx mori L., cocoons. The effect of the cultivars Miura (standard) and Korin, and the hybrids SM 14, SM 63, SK 1, SK 4 and FM 86 was evaluated on silkworm development, and on cocoon production and quality, at the Instituto Agronômico do Paraná, IAPAR, in Londrina, PR, Brazil (23 +/- 3 degrees C; 61 +/- 8% RH). The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with four replicates. Larvae feeding either on 'SK 4' or on 'Korin' showed a higher weight compared to that of larvae feeding on 'Miura'. Cocoon weight (both sexes) and pupae weight (male) obtained with larvae fed on SK 4 were higher compared with that of insects that fed on Miura; there was no difference among the remaining treatments. Silk net weight was independent of the cultivar used. Cocoon shell weight was similar amongst insects raised on 'Miura' and on the other mulberry materials. The percentage of cocoon spinning was higher than 90% in all treatments, with the spinning concentrating in the first two days. The proportion of first grade cocoons varied from 80% (SK4) to 90%. The results obtained with the studied cultivars were either similar or superior to that of the standard cultivar Miura with emphasis to 'SK 4', thus showing the potential use of these cultivars in sericulture in the state of Paraná.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18060291 PMID: 18060291 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

posted Jul 5, 2010, 2:18 AM by rajesh gk

Title

Use of sl eeve nets to improve survival of the Boisduval Silkworm, Anaphe panda, in the Kakamega forest of western Kenya.

Authors

Mbahin N, Raina SK, Kioko EN, Mueke JM.

 

Commercial Insects Programme, ICIPE-African Insect Science for Food and Health, P. O. Box: 30772-00100 Nairobi, Kenya. mnorber@icipe.org

Journal

J Insect Sci. 2010;10:6.

Abstract

Prospects for development of a wild silk industry in Africa would be improved if silkworm survival during mass production could be improved. A study on the survival of the Boisduval silkworm, Anaphe panda (Boisduval) (Lepidoptera: Thaumetopoeidae) was conducted with and without protection by net sleeves in two different forest habitats (natural and modified) in the Kakamega forest of western Kenya. Overall, cohort survival was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the natural than in the modified forest, but larval survival was improved over three-fold by protection with net sleeves in both habitat types. In the modified forest, only 16.8% of unprotected larvae survived to the pupal stage and formed cocoons, whereas 62.3% survived in the same environment when they were protected with net sleeves. In the natural forest, 20.4% of unprotected larvae survived, whereas 67.7% survived in net sleeves. There was also a significant effect of season; cohorts of larvae that eclosed in the wet season had significantly lower survival than those eclosing in the dry season (P = 0.02). Sources of mortality appeared to be natural enemies (parasites, predators and diseases) and climatic factors.

Citation

PMID: 20569137 [PubMed - in process]

 

 

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