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posted Mar 4, 2011, 8:38 AM by rajesh gk

Title

Analysis of genetic diversity of muga silkworm (Antheraea assamensis, Helfer; Lepidoptera : Saturniidae) using RAPD-based molecular markers

Authors

Kartik Neog1, H. Ranjit Singh2, Balagopalan Unni2* and A. K. Sahu3

1Central Muga Eri Research and Training Institute (CMER&TI), Central Silk Board, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat 785 700, Assam, India. 2Biotechnology Division, North East Institute of Science and Technology (NEIST), Jorhat 785 006, India. 3Regional Muga Research Station (RMRS), Central Silk Board, Boko, Kamrup, Assam, India.

Journal

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(12), pp. 1746-1752, 22 March, 2010

Abstract

Eleven populations of muga silkworm, Antheraea assamensis Helfer, the golden silk yarn producer of northeast India, was subjected to RAPD marker analysis in order to assess its genetic diversity. The genomic DNA extracted from muga silkworms were analysed using 50 random primers among which 36 polymorphic primers generated 309 bands. RAPD profile of the isolated DNA revealed a high level of genetic polymorphism. The average amplicons per primer was found to be 8.58, and 94.82% amplicons were polymorphic. Cluster analysis based on Jaccard’s similarity coefficients resulted in the formation of two main clusters with one population on one cluster and the remaining on the other cluster. Jaccard’s similarity coefficients ranged from 0.122 to 0.863 indicating a high level of genetic diversity within muga silkworm collection. The study concluded that, although there lays little morphological differences among the collected muga silkworm populations, the populations are highly polymorphic which might have enabled the silkworm to survive under a restricted geographical location, that is north east region of India only but under diverse climatic conditions for a long period. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of A. assamensis, which may be conserved on a priority basis. Key words: Muga silkworm, Antheraea assamensis, RAPD markers, genetic diversity.

Citation

ISSN 1684–5315 © 2010 Academic Journals Accepted 16 February, 2010 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB

 

Title

Antheraea pernyi silk fiber: a potential resource for artificially biospinning spider dragline silk.

Authors

Zhang Y, Yang H, Shao H, Hu X.

State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China.

Journal

J Biomed Biotechnol. 2010;2010:683962. Epub 2010 May 5.

Abstract

The outstanding properties of spider dragline silk are likely to be determined by a combination of the primary sequences and the secondary structure of the silk proteins. Antheraea pernyi silk has more similar sequences to spider dragline silk than the silk from its domestic counterpart, Bombyx mori. This makes it much potential as a resource for biospinning spider dragline silk. This paper further verified its possibility as the resource from the mechanical properties and the structures of the A. pernyi silks prepared by forcible reeling. It is surprising that the stress-strain curves of the A. pernyi fibers show similar sigmoidal shape to those of spider dragline silk. Under a controlled reeling speed of 95 mm/s, the breaking energy was 1.04 x 10(5) J/kg, the tensile strength was 639 MPa and the initial modulus was 9.9 GPa. It should be noted that this breaking energy of the A. pernyi silk approaches that of spider dragline silk. The tensile properties, the optical orientation and the beta-sheet structure contents of the silk fibers are remarkably increased by raising the spinning speeds up to 95 mm/s.

Citation

PMID: 20454537 [PubMed - in process]PMCID: PMC2864894 Free PMC Article

 

Title

Analysis of Transcripts Expressed in One-Day-Old Larvae and Fifth Instar Silk Glands of Tasar Silkworm, Antheraea mylitta.

Authors

Maity S, Goel SI, Roy S, Ghorai S, Bhattacharyya S, Venugopalan A, Ghosh AK.

Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302, India.

Journal

Comp Funct Genomics. 2010:246738. Epub 2010 May 4

Abstract

Antheraea mylitta is one of the wild nonmulberry silkworms, which produces tasar silk. An EST project has been undertaken to understand the gene expression profile of A. mylitta silk gland. Two cDNA libraries, one from the whole bodies of one-day-old larvae and the other from the silkglands of fifth instar larvae, were constructed and sequenced. A total of 2476 good-quality ESTs (1239 clones) were obtained and grouped into 648 clusters containing 390 contigs and 258 singletons to represent 467 potential unigenes. Forty-five sequences contained putative coding region, and represented potentially novel genes. Among the 648 clusters, 241 were categorized according to Gene Ontology hierarchy and showed presence of several silk and immune-related genes. The A. mylitta ESTs have been organized into a freely available online database "AmyBASE". These data provide an initial insight into the A. mylitta transcriptome and help to understand the molecular mechanism of silk protein production in a Lepidopteran species.

Citation

PMID: 20454581 [PubMed - in process]PMCID: PMC2864506 Free PMC Article

 

 

Title

Susceptibility of three Eco-races of tropical Tasar silkworm to Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (AmCPV)

Authors

Singh1, G.P.*, Srivastava, A.K., Prakash, B., Ojha, N.G., Suryanarayana, N., Zeya, S.B.,

Journal

Caspian J. Env. Sci., 6, 161-165. ( 2008 )

Abstract

Pathogenic infection in tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury. is common and there is a breed specific response regarding tolerance. Observations reveal the possibility of differential response by haemocytes to microbial infection in different breeds. Hence, the susceptibility of three eco-races of tasar silkworm viz. Daba, Sarihan and Raily to Antheraea mylitta Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus (AmCPV) infection and difference in total haemocyte counts were tested. The survival of Daba, Sarihan and Raily eco-races was significantly different (p < 0.05) when challenged with the same concentration (1 x 105 polyhedra/ml) of AmCPV. Daba eco-race was more tolerant to the AmCPV infection having higher survival (66.7%) and LC50 values (1000893.1796 polyhedra/ml) of AmCPV followed by Sarihan eco-race (50.7% survival and LC50 value of AmCPV 187203.6168 polyhedra/ml.) and Raily eco-race (25.3% survival and LC50 value of AmCPV 5176.37 polyhedra/ml.). Difference in total haemocyte count i.e. higher in tolerant (Daba) and lower in susceptible (Raily) eco-race may be in response to difference to their susceptibility to AmCPV infection.

Citation

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Title

Analysis of Transcripts Expressed in One-Day-Old Larvae and Fifth Instar Silk Glands of Tasar Silkworm, Antheraea mylitta

Authors

Samita Maity ; Sagar I. Goel ; Sobhan Roy ; Suvankar Ghorai ; Swati Bhattacharyya ; Aravind Venugopalan ; Ananta K. Ghosh

Journal

Comparative and Functional Genomics

Abstract

Antheraea mylitta is one of the wild nonmulberry silkworms, which produces tasar silk. An EST project has been undertaken to understand the gene expression profile of A. mylitta silk gland. Two cDNA libraries, one from the whole bodies of one-day-old larvae and the other from the silkglands of fifth instar larvae, were constructed and sequenced. A total of 2476 good-quality ESTs (1239 clones) were obtained and grouped into 648 clusters containing 390 contigs and 258 singletons to represent 467 potential unigenes. Forty-five sequences contained putative coding region, and represented potentially novel genes. Among the 648 clusters, 241 were categorized according to Gene Ontology hierarchy and showed presence of several silk and immune-related genes. The A. mylitta ESTs have been organized into a freely available online database “AmyBASE”. These data provide an initial insight into the A. mylitta transcriptome and help to understand the molecular mechanism of silk protein production in a Lepidopteran specie

Citation

FULL TEXT

 

Title

Analysis of genetic diversity of muga silkworm (Antheraea assamensis, Helfer; Lepidoptera : Saturniidae) using RAPD-based molecular markers

Authors

Kartik Neog1, H. Ranjit Singh2, Balagopalan Unni2* and A. K. Sahu3

1Central Muga Eri Research and Training Institute (CMER&TI), Central Silk Board, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat 785 700, Assam, India. 2Biotechnology Division, North East Institute of Science and Technology (NEIST), Jorhat 785 006, India. 3Regional Muga Research Station (RMRS), Central Silk Board, Boko, Kamrup, Assam, India.

Journal

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(12), pp. 1746-1752, 22 March, 2010

Abstract

Eleven populations of muga silkworm, Antheraea assamensis Helfer, the golden silk yarn producer of northeast India, was subjected to RAPD marker analysis in order to assess its genetic diversity. The genomic DNA extracted from muga silkworms were analysed using 50 random primers among which 36 polymorphic primers generated 309 bands. RAPD profile of the isolated DNA revealed a high level of genetic polymorphism. The average amplicons per primer was found to be 8.58, and 94.82% amplicons were polymorphic. Cluster analysis based on Jaccard’s similarity coefficients resulted in the formation of two main clusters with one population on one cluster and the remaining on the other cluster. Jaccard’s similarity coefficients ranged from 0.122 to 0.863 indicating a high level of genetic   diversity within muga silkworm collection. The study concluded that, although there lays little morphological differences among the collected muga silkworm populations, the populations are highly polymorphic which might have enabled the silkworm to survive under a restricted geographical location, that is north east region of India only but under diverse climatic conditions for a long period. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of A. assamensis, which may be conserved on a priority basis. Key words: Muga silkworm, Antheraea assamensis, RAPD markers, genetic diversity.

Citation

ISSN 1684–5315 © 2010 Academic Journals Accepted 16 February, 2010 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB

 

posted Jul 16, 2010, 1:35 AM by rajesh gk

Title

Analysis of genetic diversity of muga silkworm (Antheraea assamensis, Helfer; Lepidoptera : Saturniidae) using RAPD-based molecular markers

Authors

Kartik Neog1, H. Ranjit Singh2, Balagopalan Unni2* and A. K. Sahu3

1Central Muga Eri Research and Training Institute (CMER&TI), Central Silk Board, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat 785 700, Assam, India. 2Biotechnology Division, North East Institute of Science and Technology (NEIST), Jorhat 785 006, India. 3Regional Muga Research Station (RMRS), Central Silk Board, Boko, Kamrup, Assam, India.

Journal

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(12), pp. 1746-1752, 22 March, 2010

Abstract

Eleven populations of muga silkworm, Antheraea assamensis Helfer, the golden silk yarn producer of northeast India, was subjected to RAPD marker analysis in order to assess its genetic diversity. The genomic DNA extracted from muga silkworms were analysed using 50 random primers among which 36 polymorphic primers generated 309 bands. RAPD profile of the isolated DNA revealed a high level of genetic polymorphism. The average amplicons per primer was found to be 8.58, and 94.82% amplicons were polymorphic. Cluster analysis based on Jaccard’s similarity coefficients resulted in the formation of two main clusters with one population on one cluster and the remaining on the other cluster. Jaccard’s similarity coefficients ranged from 0.122 to 0.863 indicating a high level of genetic diversity within muga silkworm collection. The study concluded that, although there lays little morphological differences among the collected muga silkworm populations, the populations are highly polymorphic which might have enabled the silkworm to survive under a restricted geographical location, that is north east region of India only but under diverse climatic conditions for a long period. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of A. assamensis, which may be conserved on a priority basis. Key words: Muga silkworm, Antheraea assamensis, RAPD markers, genetic diversity.

Citation

ISSN 1684–5315 © 2010 Academic Journals Accepted 16 February, 2010 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB

 

Title

High yield and quality silk fibre production by muga silkworm, Antheraea assama through application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

Authors

B. G. Unni1,*, Utpala Bora1, H. R. Singh1, B. S. Dileep Kumar1, Barnali Devi1, S. B. Wann1, Archana Bora1, B. S. Bhau1, K. Neog2 and R. Chakravorty2

1Biotechnology Division, North-East Institute of Science and Technology (formerly Regional Research Laboratory), Jorhat 785 006, India 2Central Muga Eri Research and Training Institute, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat 785 700, India

Journal

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 94, NO. 6, 25 MARCH 2008 

Abstract

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were isolated from the rhizosphere of som plants (Machilus bombycina) maintained at the experimental farms of Central Muga Eri Research and Training Institute, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat. Microbial isolates were characterized and screened for effectiveness by spraying combinations of strains on the som plants. Selective and specific functional compatibility relationships in plant response between the microbial inoculants were observed. The effects of the PGPR combinations through increase in chlorophyll content, free amino acid, total protein, reducing sugar, carbohydrate and dry weight were studied. Five strains showing growthpromoting activity were selected and all the combinations had positive effect on the biochemical parameters studied, but the combination of RB1 + RB3 + RB4 + RB5 + RB8 strains produced the best result. Muga silkworm larvae fed on som leaves of the plant treated with this strain combination had higher activity of the enzymes, viz. trehalase, transaminase and phosphorylase in the silk gland, haemolymph and fat body. The cocoons of these silkworms produced more silk in terms of quality and quantity. This study could be exploited for improvement in quality and quantity of silk production through the application of PGPR.

 

Title

Molecular genetic relationships between Bombycidae and Saturniidae based on the mitochondria DNA encoding of large and small rRNA.

Authors

Hwang JS, Lee JS, Goo TW, Yun EY, Sohn HR, Kim HR, Kwon OY.

National Sericulture and Entomology Research, R.D.A., Suwon, South Korea.

Journal

Genet Anal. 1999 Dec 15;15(6):223-8.

Abstract

The phylogenetic relationships between Bombycidae (Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina) and Saturniidae (Antheraea yamamai and Antheraea pernyi) were investigated based on large and small mitochondiral rRNA genes. About 430 bp of four kinds of PCR-amplified fragments were sequenced and aligned. For the 16S rRNA gene, B. mori shared a 98, 87 and 86% sequence homology with B. mandarina, A. yamamai and A. pernyi, and for the 12S rRNA gene, B. mori shared a 99, 89 and 88% sequence homology with B. mandarina, A. yamamai and A. pernyi, respectively. DNA sequence data were also used for a phylogenetic analysis. All of the trees showed monophyly for both Bombycidae and Saturniidae. The monophyly confidence limits of these trees were estimated using bootstrapping tests and measured more than 99% for all trees for both Bombycidae and Saturniidae.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10609758 PMID: 10609758 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

posted Jul 9, 2010, 9:19 AM by rajesh gk

Title

A cuticle protein gene from the Japanese oak silkmoth, Antheraea yamamai: gene structure and mRNA expression.

Authors

Kim BY, Park NS, Jin BR, Lee BH, Seong SI, Hwang JS, Chang JS, Lee SM.

 

Department of Sericulture and Entomology, Miryang National University, 627-130, Miryang, Korea.

Journal

Biotechnol Lett. 2005 Oct;27(19):1499-504.

Abstract

A cuticle protein gene, AyCP12, from the Japanese oak silkmoth, Antheraea yamamai, was isolated and characterized. The gene spans 1107 bp and consists of one intron and two exons coding for a 112 amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 12,163 Da and a pI of 4.4. The AyCP12 protein contained a type-specific consensus sequence identifiable in other insect cuticle proteins and the deduced amino acid sequence of the AyCP12 cDNA is most homologous to another silkmoth, A. pernyi, cuticle protein ApCP13 (82% protein sequence identity). Northern blot analysis revealed that AyCP12 showed the epidermis-specific expression.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16231223 PMID: 16231223 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

posted Jul 9, 2010, 9:13 AM by rajesh gk

Title

Characterization of Antheraea pernyi nucleopolyhedrovirus p11 gene, a homologue of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus orf108.

Authors

Shi SL, Pan MH, Lu C.

Key Sericultural Laboratory of Agriculture Ministry, College of Sericulture and Biotechnology, Southwest University, Chongqing, 400716, China.

Journal

Virus Genes. 2007 Aug;35(1):97-101. Epub 2006 Oct 27.

Abstract

Antheraea pernyi nucleopolyhedrovirus (ApNPV) p11 gene is 309 bp long, potentially encoding 102 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 11.2 kDa. ApNPV p11 gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pQE-30 and P11 was expressed in E. coli M15. Polyclonal antiserum was made against 6xHis tagged P11 protein expressed in E. coli M15. P11 gene transcription was detected as early as 36 h post-infection (p.i.) in tussah pupa and remain at high level up to 96 h p.i. Structural localization revealed that P11 protein was present in polyhedral inclusion bodies (PIB) dilute alkaline saline (DAS) pellet (P) fractions and occlusion-derived virus (ODV), but not in PIB DAS supernatant (S) fractions and budded virus (BV). These results indicated that P11 was associated with ApNPV structure.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17072759 PMID: 17072759 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

Title

Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a novel cuticle protein from the Chinese oak Silkmoth, Antheraea pernyi.

Authors

Kim BY, Park NS, Jin BR, Lee SM.

 

Department of Sericulture and Entomology, Miryang National University, South Korea.

Journal

DNA Seq. 2005 Oct;16(5):397-401.

Abstract

In our research to identify gene involved in the cuticle protein, we cloned a novel cuticle protein gene, ApCP13, from the Chinese oak silkmoth, Antheraea pernyi, larvae cDNA library. The ApCP13 gene encodes a 120 amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 13 kDa and a pI of 4.01, and is intron-less gene. The ApCP13 contained a type-specific consensus sequence identifiable in other insect cuticle proteins and the deduced amino acid sequence of the ApCP13 cDNA is most homologous to another wild silkmoth, A. yamamai CP12 (86% protein sequence identity), followed by Bombyx mori LCP18 (35% protein sequence identity). Northern blot analysis revealed that the ApCP13 showed the epidermis-specific expression. This is the first report of cuticle protein gene in the wild silkmoth, A. pernyi.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16323268 PMID: 16323268 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

posted Jul 5, 2010, 2:13 AM by rajesh gk

Title

Morphology and tensile properties of silk fibers produced by uncommon Saturniidae.

Authors

Reddy N, Yang Y.

 

Department of Textiles, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 68583-0802, United States.

Journal

Int J Biol Macromol. 2010 May 1;46(4):419-24. Epub 2010 Mar 6.

Abstract

Silk fibers produced by undomesticated wild insects belonging to the Saturniidae family have unique properties compared to the commonly used silks. Insects belonging to the Saturniidae family are one of the largest moths found throughout the world, produce large cocoons and are easier to rear than B. mori. In this research, we have characterized the morphology and tensile properties of silks produced by eight wild insects that belong to the Saturniidae family. Fibers produced by Saturniidae insects such as C. hercuels have properties similar to that of B. mori silk whereas fibers produced by Copaxa multifenestrata have inferior properties than B. mori or the common wild silks. In addition, the tensile properties of the fibers vary considerably between insects. Fibers with fineness ranging from 1.5 to 7.8denier and breaking tenacity ranging from 0.9 to 5g per denier are produced by the Saturniidae insects. Identifying the unique properties of Saturniidae silks such as tensile properties, yield of silk from the cocoons and ability to grow under different environments will help to evaluate the potential of rearing the wild insects for commercial production of silk for textile, medical and other applications. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Citation

PMID: 20211646 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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