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posted Mar 4, 2011, 7:52 AM by rajesh gk

Title

Mulberry (Morus alba) leaves as human food: a new dimension of sericulture.

Authors

Srivastava S, Kapoor R, Thathola A, Srivastava RP.

Department of Foods and Nutrition, College of Home Science Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, U.S. Nagar, Uttaranchal, India.

Journal

Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2003 Nov;54(6):411-6.

Abstract

Mulberry leaf is commonly used for sericulture in almost every part of the world but its potential to be utilized for human consumption is not well recognized. This paper deals with development of mulberry leaf powder and its use with wheat flour to develop paratha, the most common food item of breakfast and dinner in the Indian diet. The optimum ratio of the mulberry leaf powder and wheat flour (MLP-WF) mix for preparation of paratha on the basis of sensory quality was found to be 1:4. The protein quality of the MLP-WF mix was estimated by measuring the Protein Efficiency Ratio, and was found to be 1.82 against a casein diet for which a value of 2.44 was observed. The in vivo toxic effect of mix was studied and no adverse effect on the growth of internal organs of rats (heart, liver, kidney and testes) was found. The storage stability of the mix was estimated for a period of 2 months in polyethylene bags at room temperature. A non-significant difference was observed between paratha prepared from fresh and stored mix. This indicated that mix can be stored for a period of 2 months at room temperature without loss of quality.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14522686 PMID: 14522686 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

Title

[Advances in the study and development of medical uses of sericulture and mulberry resources]

[Article in Chinese]

Authors

Chen W, Xiao G, Liao S.

Institute of Sericulture, Guangdong Provincial Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, 510640

Journal

Zhong Yao Cai. 1999 Sep;22(9):481-4.

Abstract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12908502

Citation

PMID: 12908502 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

Title

Purification and characterization of antiviral protein from silkworm fecal matter

Authors

Neelagund, S.E.*, Ingalhalli, S.S., Savanurmath, C.J., Hinchigeri3, S.B., Hiremath, M. B

Journal

Caspian J. Env. Sci., 5, 77-85. , ( 2007 ),

Abstract

Antiviral proteins (AVP), present in silkworm fecal matter, show activity against nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) in vitro and in vivo. The extract of silkworm fecal matter prepared in phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.5 was subjected to 50% solid ammonium sulfate precipitation to enrich AVP, then which was dialyzed. The dialysate was applied to the column containing silica gel-G, the column elutes were purified by gelfiltration chromatography. The gelfiltration pattern gave three protein peaks A, B and C. The protein obtained from peak fractions of peak A is found to be active against NPV in vitro. Whereas the proteins were obtained from peak fractions of peaks C and B were not shown activity against NPV in vitro. The peak A fractions were collected and further purified by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) using C4 column. Purified AVP of SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) resulted in two protein bands with the molecular mass of 23 KD and 16 KD. Thymol sulphuric acid method of carbohydrate staining indicated that both of these protein bands are glycoproteins. AVP activity is determined in vitro by precipitation reaction. In vivo activity of the AVP is confirmed by conducting the bioassay in silkworms.

Citation

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Title

UV-B Induced Changes in the Secondary Metabolites of Morus alba L. Leaves

Authors

Xi-Da Gu ; Ming-Yao Sun ; Lin Zhang ; Hong-Wei Fu ; Lei Cui ; Run-Ze Chen ; Da-Wei Zhang ; Jing-Kui Tian

Journal

Molecules, 2010; 15(5) 2980-2993

Abstract

Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation is harmful to plants and human beings. Many secondary metabolites, like flavonoids, alkaloids, and lignin, are UV-B absorbing compounds, which can protect the genetic material of plants. Furthermore, they are active components of herbal drugs. UV-B radiation can activate the self-protective secondary metabolism system. The results of this paper provide a method to induce bioactive secondary metabolites from mulberry leaves (Morus alba L.) by UV-B irradiation in vitro. Five significantly different chromatographic peaks were found by HPLC fingerprint after induction, from which two active compounds were identified: One was chalcomoracin, a natural Diels-Alder type adduct with antibacterial activity; the other one was moracin N, which is a precursor of chalcomoracin. Their contents were 0.818 mg/g and 0.352 mg/g by dry weight, respectively.

Citation

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Title

Two chitinase-like proteins abundantly accumulated in latex of mulberry show insecticidal activity

Authors

Kitajima Sakihito ; Kamei Kaeko ; Taketani Shigeru ; Yamaguchi Masamitsu ; Kawai Fumiko ; Komatsu Aino ; Inukai Yoshihiro

Journal

BMC Biochemistry, 2010; 11(1) p. 6

Abstract

Background: Plant latex is the cytoplasm of highly specialized cells known as laticifers, and is thought to have a critical role in defense against herbivorous insects. Proteins abundantly accumulated in latex might therefore be involved in the defense system.

Results: We purified latex abundant protein a and b (LA-a and LA-b) from mulberry (Morus sp.) and analyzed their properties. LA-a and LA-b have molecular masses of approximately 50 and 46 kDa, respectively, and are abundant in the soluble fraction of latex. Western blotting analysis suggested that they share sequence similarity with each other. The sequences of LA-a and LA-b, as determined by Edman degradation, showed chitin-binding domains of plant chitinases at the N termini. These proteins showed small but significant chitinase and chitosanase activities. Lectin RCA120 indicated that, unlike common plant chitinases, LA-a and LA-b are glycosylated. LA-a and LA-b showed insecticidal activities when fed to larvae of the model insect Drosophila melanogaster.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the two LA proteins have a crucial role in defense against herbivorous insects, possibly by hydrolyzing their chitin.

Citation

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Title

Effect of Replacing Dietary Fish Meal with Silkworm (Anaphe infracta) Caterpillar Meal on Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Haematological Parameters of Finishing Broiler Chicken

Authors

A.T. Ijaiya ; E.O. Eko

Journal

Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 2009; 8(6); p. 850-855

Abstract

The effects of substituting fish meal with different levels of silkworm (Anaphe infracta) caterpillar meal (SCM) on the growth, carcass characteristics haematology and economics of production formed the basis of this study. A total of one hundred and fifty four weeks old anak broilers were randomly allotted to five treatment groups in a completely randomized design with each treatment having thirty birds. Each treatment group was further divided into two replicates of fifteen birds per replicate. Five diets which had 100% FM: 0% SCM; 75% FM: 25% SCM; 50% FM: 50% SCM; 25% FM: 75% SCM and 0% FM: 100% SCM were formulated and labeled diets 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively with diet 1 serving as the control. Feed and water were provided ad-libitum. The performance in terms of feed intake (95.71g-98.25g), body weight gain (46.10g- 98.51g), feed conversion efficiency (1.98-2.08) and protein efficiency ratio (2.41-2.54) showed no significant (P > 0.05) differences across the dietary treatments. Analysis of weight of carcass and body cuts as well as blood parameters apart from blood albumin indicated no significant (P > 0.05) differences between the treatment means. Cost per kg of feed gradually decline with increasing dietary level of SCM inclusion levels indicating higher economic benefit. The result of this study revealed that the growth performance of the birds was not affected by the incorporation of silkworm caterpillar meal and it was more cost effective than conventional fish meal. It was concluded that cheaper silkworm caterpillar meal can be use as a complete substitute for fish meal in the diet of finishing broiler chickens.

Citation

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posted Jul 16, 2010, 1:28 AM by rajesh gk

 

Title

High yield and quality silk fibre production by muga silkworm, Antheraea assama through application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

Authors

B. G. Unni1,*, Utpala Bora1, H. R. Singh1, B. S. Dileep Kumar1, Barnali Devi1, S. B. Wann1, Archana Bora1, B. S. Bhau1, K. Neog2 and R. Chakravorty2

1Biotechnology Division, North-East Institute of Science and Technology (formerly Regional Research Laboratory), Jorhat 785 006, India 2Central Muga Eri Research and Training Institute, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat 785 700, India

Journal

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 94, NO. 6, 25 MARCH 2008  

Abstract

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were isolated from the rhizosphere of som plants (Machilus bombycina) maintained at the experimental farms of Central Muga Eri Research and Training Institute, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat. Microbial isolates were characterized and screened for effectiveness by spraying combinations of strains on the som plants. Selective and specific functional compatibility relationships in plant response between the microbial inoculants were observed. The effects of the PGPR combinations through increase in chlorophyll content, free amino acid, total protein, reducing sugar, carbohydrate and dry weight were studied. Five strains showing growthpromoting activity were selected and all the combinations had positive effect on the biochemical parameters studied, but the combination of RB1 + RB3 + RB4 + RB5 + RB8 strains produced the best result. Muga silkworm larvae fed on som leaves of the plant treated with this strain combination had higher activity of the enzymes, viz. trehalase, transaminase and phosphorylase in the silk gland, haemolymph and fat body. The cocoons of these silkworms produced more silk in terms of quality and quantity. This study could be exploited for improvement in quality and quantity of silk production through the application of PGPR.

 

Title

Sensitization to silk and childhood asthma in rural China.

Authors

Celedón JC, Palmer LJ, Xu X, Wang B, Fang Z, Weiss ST.

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. juan.celedon@channing.harvard.edu

Journal

Pediatrics. 2001 May;107(5):E80.

Abstract

Sensitization to perennial aeroallergens is associated with asthma in industrialized countries with a Western lifestyle. Because silk products are commonly used in Chinese society, we were interested in examining the relation between sensitization to silk and asthma. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of 871 children in 503 families living in Anqing, a predominantly rural province of China. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, gender, familial correlations, and sensitization to other aeroallergens, skin test reactivity to silk was an independent predictor of asthma (odds ratio = 2.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-5.7). This association became stronger after inclusion of the eosinophil count and history of parasitic diseases of the participants in the multivariate model (odds ratio = 3.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.4-8.9). CONCLUSION: Because sericulture is an important activity in China and other countries throughout the world, sensitization to silk may influence the pathogenesis and severity of asthma in people living in these nations.

Citation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11331730 PMID: 11331730 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

posted Jul 5, 2010, 1:48 AM by rajesh gk

Title

How valid is a short measure of effort-reward imbalance at work? A replication study from Sweden.

Authors

Leineweber C, Wege N, Westerlund H, Theorell T, Wahrendorf M, Siegrist J.

 

Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Journal

Occup Environ Med. 2010 Jun 23. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Objectives There is an urgent need for validated measures of health-adverse psychosocial work environments. We tested the validity of a newly developed short version of the original questionnaire measuring effort-reward imbalance at work (ERI). Methods The study sample comprised working men and women (n=4771) participating in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), a nationally representative longitudinal cohort study, in 2006 and 2008. Structural equation modelling was applied to test factorial validity, using the ERI scales. Furthermore, criterion validity was explored with two prospectively assessed health indicators, poor self-reported health and depressive symptoms. Results are based on logistic and linear regression analyses, with appropriate confounder control. Results The short version of the ERI questionnaire (16 items) provides satisfactory psychometric properties (internal consistency of scales, confirmatory factor analysis with a good model fit of the data with the theoretical structure). All scales, and the effort-reward ratio, were prospectively associated with an increased risk of poor general self-rated health and depressive symptoms, indicating satisfactory criterion validity. Conclusion This short version of the ERI questionnaire provides a psychometrically useful tool for epidemiological studies focused on the health-adverse effects of work and employment in the context of a globalised economy.

Citation

PMID: 20573847 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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