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Kick-off Meeting Notes



What Happened at the Ship2Shore Science Kick-off Meeting?

On February 29th 2012, fifty-five scientists, educators, media experts and other friends of Ship-to-Shore Science responded to an Invitation.  They gathered in Open Space -- with no more agenda than what is laid out in that letter. An hour or so later, they had raised more than 50 issues, large and small, related to Ship-to-Shore Science and arranged them into an agenda of 34 working sessions. Over the next two days, they self-managed and documented these working sessions, adding and combining a few more along the way.

All of the issues, notes and voting results are included here for your review.  These are the living, breathing, working documents, captured and typed by the participants themselves, in the heat of high learning and active contributing, meant only to enable the round of conversation and action.  They are full of passion and energy and ideas, but not always pretty. They are work in progress.  Please take them as open invitations to get connected to the important and diverse work Ship-to-Shore Science. 

On the third day, each participant received all of the notes from all of the sessions. Each participant then identified for himself or herself the most important of these issues. Using sticky-dot voting technology, participants ranked and prioritized all the issues, as a springboard into proposal-writing sessions that followed. 

The voting results were taken NOT as political winners and losers, but as practical starting points for the large amount of work to be done.  Scroll down for a chart of all voting results.

Top Issues 

  • #15 - Museum Exhibit for Small to Medium Venues 
  • #24 -Develop Regional Networks for IODP Outreach Programs 
  • #19 - Art + Science 

Second Tier 

  • #28: Engaging Diverse Communities 
  • #29: San Francisco Port Visit and Museum Educational Programming 
  • #1: How Can We Create Meaningful Connections Between Students and Scientists Through Distance Learning? 
  • #7: What’s the BIG Idea? Why it is a critical step. 
  • #23: Documentary on IODP Science (history and future) 
  • #27: Dissemination of Information

One participant provided another useful sorting of the issues:

  • A- Distance Learning Interaction Ship-to-Shore (Issues #1, 2, and 5) 
  • B- Educators (formal/informal) opportunities, networking (#3, 8, 24, 32, 13, 32, and 33) 
  • C- Reaching Different Publics (#4, 6, 11, 16, 28, 14) 
  • D- Content Resources (#9, 15, 23, 25) 
  • E- Dissemination (#27) 
  • F- Evaluation (#26) 
  • Other Issues: Careers (#17) and Art & Science (#19)

Finally, working groups were convened by the (people) below, to work on the following proposal ideas.  These, and perhaps others, will now be developed into complete proposals.  

  • Art & Science Proposal (Dinah Bowman)
  • Museum Exhibit Proposal (Deborah Cowman)
  • Connecting the arts with reaching children and everyone through film, live performances,
  • Education by partnering with NASA to help faster the ship coming to San Francisco and the Explorers Museum, and other museums (Louise Phillips)
  • Distance Learning program framework for on-board use./ Shipboard Educators’ plan + template (Becky Nellis and ?)
  • Regional Hub/Outreach activities/ Science kits – ocean science fairs – JR Live Link session/ JR Mobile (Kevin Kurtz, Sarah, and one other convener)
  • Video modules create proposals for a few video modules based on a communication plan that meets outreach needs (Dan & Patrice)
  • Facilitating informal education and cooperation between IODP, NASA, and NOAA (Bob Stern)
See below for reports from the first two days of working sessions.  A new, Pilot Project Proposals page will be created to detail progress through the March 19th proposal deadline. 

All Issues Ranked

posted Mar 3, 2012, 6:19 AM by Michael Herman   [ updated Mar 3, 2012, 6:34 AM ]


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TABLE OF CONTENTS -- COPIED FROM PDF DOCUMENT

ISSUE #1: How Can We Create Meaningful Connections Between Students and Scientists Through Distance Learning?............................................................................................................9

ISSUE #2: Use of emerging technologies to connect to k-12 and to deepen the scientific connections for scientists and schools ...........................................................................................11

ISSUE #3: Fostering Learning Opportunities between Formal Educators (K-20) & Informal Educators........................................................................................................................................13

ISSUE #4: How do we bring the science and information from the Deep Earth Academy to out of school clubs and organizations, such as boys/girls clubs, 4-H, scouting, etc?...............................14

ISSUE #5: Better Webcast Production Ship-board........................................................................16

ISSUE #6: Engaging the Unengaged.............................................................................................18

ISSUE #7: What’s The Big Idea? Why it is a critical step.............................................................21

ISSUE #8: Professional Development/Educator Networks...........................................................23

ISSUE #9: Interactive Children's eBook, Educational App, Create an iBook contest, and Mash- up contest .......................................................................................................................................25

ISSUE #10: “Looking at You!” Real time links/observations of the JR’s science and ship operations .......................................................................................................................................28

ISSUE #11: Ideas for Summer Camp Curriculum.........................................................................29

ISSUE #12: How to use cruise ship-based programming to engage and connect .........................32

ISSUE #13: Using Ocean exploration to motivate young children for technology.......................34

ISSUE #14: Who is our audience and how do we reach them at their level..................................35

ISSUE #15: Museum exhibit for small to medium venues............................................................37

ISSUE #16: IODP science & education participation for mobility-impaired scientists, educators, and students....................................................................................................................................39

ISSUE #17: Careers .......................................................................................................................41 

ISSUE #18: You can't understand climate change deeply without understanding systems...........42

ISSUE #19: Art + Science..............................................................................................................44 

ISSUE #20: Virtual Fieldwork.......................................................................................................47 

ISSUE #21: Communication for scientists, kids, & educators ......................................................48 

ISSUE #22: Integrating outreach and research..............................................................................51 

ISSUE #23: Documentary on IODP science (history & future) ....................................................52 

ISSUE #24: Develop Regional Networks for IODP outreach programs .......................................53 

ISSUE #25: Reaching the Video Game Generation: Comics, Animation, Drawings, etc. ............55 

ISSUE #26: How do we measure success?....................................................................................56 

ISSUE #27: Dissemination of Information....................................................................................57 

ISSUE #28: Engaging Diverse Communities................................................................................60 

ISSUE #29: San Francisco Port Visit & Museum Educational Programming...............................61 

ISSUE #30: Cylindrical Science....................................................................................................63 

ISSUE #31: For The Beauty Of The Earth ....................................................................................66 

ISSUE #32: Meaningful Content for Educators (Informal) and Training .....................................68 

ISSUE #33: Collaborations & Partnerships...................................................................................70

ISSUE #34: Create a shipboard education plan and template that encompasses past work and remains flexible for new educators talents and changing needs of cruises. (posted as a write-in during the voting on day three.).....................................................................................................71 

ISSUE #34: Write-in Candidate During Voting

posted Mar 3, 2012, 6:16 AM by Michael Herman

Create a shipboard education plan and template that encompasses past work and remains flexible for new educators talents and changing needs of cruises.  

Ana Costa- the physicist's- framework

posted Mar 2, 2012, 8:12 AM by JR Resolution   [ updated Mar 5, 2012, 6:22 AM ]

A- Distance Learning Interaction Ship-Shore

Issues: 1,2, and 5

B- Educators (formal/informal) opportunities, networking

            Issues: 3, 8, 24, 32, 13, 32, and 33

 C- Reaching Different Publics

            Issues: 4, 6, 11, 16, 28, 14

 D- Content Resources

            Issues: 9, 15, 23, 25

 E- Dissemination

            Issues: 27

 F- Evaluation

            Issues: 26

 Other

G- Careers

            Issue: 17

H- Art & Science

            Issue: 19

ISSUE #33: Collaborations & Partnerships

posted Mar 1, 2012, 6:40 PM by Russ Billings   [ updated Mar 1, 2012, 8:01 PM by Michael Herman ]

CONVENER(S): Russ Billings

PARTICIPANTS: Mark Glennse, Jolee Firth, Lisa Strong, Louise Phillips, Jen, Dan Brinnhuis, Dinsh Boumma

SUMMARY OF DISCUSSION:
A. Benefits of Collaboration
  • Shared Resources
  • Scalability
  • Methodologies & Systems
  • Increased Audience
  • Increased Outputs and Outcomes(?)
B. Topics & Fields of Study
  • Impact Craters
  • Sedimentary History
  • Planetary/Geology Imaging
  • Dust & Climate
  • Atmospheric/Ocean/Land Science
  • Holistic Earth Systems Approach
  • Unique High Modified Research Platforms (Ships/Aircraft)
  • Heat: Coring into the earth/re-entry into the Atmosphere 
  • Pressure: High at Ocean Drilling Depths; Zero in Space
  • Spirit of Exploration
C. Story/Themes
  • Past (Sediments) ----> Now (Airborne Earth Science Missions)
  • Understand . . . . 
    • Remote Sensing
    • Geological History
    • Climate Change
    • IPCC
    • Cloud Cover
    • NASA Data Correlations
D. Educators (Formal & Informal)
  • Clinical Experience for Educators (Formal & Informal)
  • Spirit of Exploration
  • Developed instruction activities and guides
  • Web interfacing/Digital Learning Network
E. NASA Airborne Research for Educators (AREE) Examples
  • Offer e-PDNs (electronic-Professional Development) Georgia Tech
  • Program Workshops
    • 8 Weeks
    • 2 Weeks
    • 1 Week (Condensed)
    • 1 Week (Extended) one day a month for 7 months
    • 2.5 Days
  • Web Presence
  • On-line Community
  • Digital Badging
F. What might a "joint" Program Look Like?
  • Parallel Track - with some shared linkages & activities
  • Cross-Track, participants switch between program in alternate years
  • Air, Land & Sea Rotation: add a Land Based and Atmosphere component
  • "Sister" Program - awareness and shared community (limited to)

ISSUE #32: Meaningful Content for Educators (Informal) and Training

posted Mar 1, 2012, 4:27 PM by ship2 shore

CONVENER(S): Glen Schuster

PARTICIPANTS: Ana Noroube, Matt Niemitz, Mary Ford, Mary Andnesyk, Beky Nellis, Ted Cable

SUMMARY OF DISCUSSION:
--One key question asked:  What is the baseline information we want educators to know if they are to teach/facilitate training?

--Informal educators need to SPARK stakeholders.  They need an EMOTIONAL catch.  They need an effective soundbite for engagement!

--Visitors are at their leisure, and, as such, they need compelling content and be "edutained".  They need to know how to work the content when the encounter is short.  In this sense, informal educators need to answer the "SO WHAT?" question.  There might be:  1) an adult lecture series;  2) engaging website; or 3) program(s) for a variety of audiences, different levels.

--Some felt informal educators need "OUT-OF-THE-BOX" materials after teacher workshops.  Participants can earn graduate credit.  One distinction that could complicate this idea is that there is a REAL TIME component to JOIDES.  In summary, the training needs to be enough so that JOIDES material is useable and effective.  It needs to access knowledge and be for different audiences.
The OUT-OF-THE -BOX activities would include pilot-tested activities and experiments.  They need to be explicitly aligned to COMMON CORE for math and language arts, and new science standards when they come out.  Teachers need to take back ammunition.  "Families" also need materials that can be "taken home".

TRAINING.  Materials for training need to be carefully considered for program goals  The extent of training needs to be fleshed out, and there can be short and long versions of training.

PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM IDEAS. 
1)  IODP can partner with aquarium for instance.  There can be a program that suits their needs.  Contact AZA to partner!
2)  National Parks and Islands.  We will send Ted Cable back to the Volcanoes National Park to do a program since Hawaii's formation and its crust has natural synergies!!

Other ideas:
1)  IMAX Film connection.  National Geographic has a Deep Sea movie coming out in 2013!
2)  Be in touch with Woods Hole for a partnership with FRAMEWORKS...a national network for ocean and climate messaging.  Study circles.

What will educators do?  Besides language arts and math and science, there needs to be ENGINEERING as well as OCEAN TECHNOLOGIES for kids activities and adults.  The great pedagogical technique of "what is it?" is great.  What will people do in activities?  Ocean technologies reveal STORIES from the cores.  This is like the "HOW DOES IT WORK?" concept.  There is MOTIVATION from hearing ocean explanations.  People need to BUILD things, in engineering activities.  Perform a task.  Physics and math are relevant!

Training or activities can be themed.  ECOLOGY (with math and physics).  PHYSICS (with inquiry)..

****The BIGGEST breakthrough for the session is that INFORMAL EDUCATORS need a focus in INTERPRETATION.  FORMAL EDUCATORS need content.  Any training should consider this.

International Ideas:
What would an international formal education institution (Lisbon Museum) want from Deep Earth Academy if they participate in a program.  1) Scientist interaction; 2) Exchange programs for educators from science centers in US (or schools) and vice-versa.  An low-cost exchange between countires could be a "contest" where institutions could GUESS what they are looking at...This type of exchange of information would motivate schools or teams of students.  One idea was "count forminifera".  The contest could be relevant to the geography of where a country is, with core samples from various sites from around the world.

ISSUE #31: For The Beauty Of The Earth

posted Mar 1, 2012, 4:10 PM by John Firth   [ updated Mar 1, 2012, 4:13 PM by JR Resolution ]

Converner:  John Firth

Particiapants: Dinah Bowman, talk with various people in the hallway. Not formal session.

SUmmary of IDEA:

as a micropaleontoogist and microscopist, as wellas geologist, I have seen and appreciated the beauty of the earth. but eh microscopic world that fills the cores of ocean drilling is almost unknown to the world. many books and web pages and other media have been used to show natures glories for big things - canyones, forests, mountains, starts, galaxies, etc.  Even human sized fossils and rocks and biota are well illustrated.  but not microfossils or the intertwined minerals of rocks that show varying stain-glass like colors when rotated under cross-polarized light.

my inspiration come from verses like these:

"How many are your works, O Lord! In wisdom you made them all; the earth is full of your creatures. There is the sea, vast and spacious, teeming with creatures beyond number-living things both large and small. (Psalm 104:24-25);

and "All streams flow into the sea, yet the sea is never full. To the place the streams come from, there they return again. ((Ecclesiastes 1:7))  which speak directly to the presence of tiny organisms teeming in teh oceans plus also the processes of water - the water cycle form land ot seaback to air back to land through rainfall. 


These processes of the water cycle, the carbon cycle, climate change, the tectonic cycle form mantle to crust to mantle , etc. can all be seen in pictures of cores - rocks and sediments visible to the naked eye, but also microsocpic views of these same materials in our drill cores.


Proposal:


2 books:


FIRST: a coffe table type book of beaitful jmicrofosisl of all ages from ocean drilling cores - from 200 million years ago to present. tens of thousands of microfossils exist to fill such a book or books. taking the best photos of the bext specimens showing the incredible variety and architecture of these fossils is part of the book.  second is artisitic renderings of the pure photographs. natuer as art can be interpreted by impressionistic recreations of microfossils, photos of stained glass windows designed based on thin sections of colored minerals, are examples of artistic expressions of the natural things in teh photos.



SECOND BOOK:  THE REPETITION OF DESIGN AT MANY SCALES:

microfossils and even minerals shows deisgns that can be found in man made designs of all kinds from cereal boxes to hood ornaments on different car manufacturers. hexagonal crystals of olivine can be found repeated int eh hexagonal cooled columns of basalt of Devil's Tower, WYoming, or in teh Giants Stairway or Causeway in Scotland or Ireland.

Also, designs of microfossils mirror architecture at the molecular level, the atomic level and even the galactic level. a book of photos showing microfossil and couunterparts with same designs of varioous scales form teh atomic/molecular to the human/man-made scale to the astronomic scale woudl emphasize the repetetive nature of nature!  it also woudl show that what humans have designed has often already been designed and built millions of years before, without our knowledge.


it also could serve as inspiration for new human design of art, architecture, etc.










ISSUE #30: Cylindrical Science

posted Mar 1, 2012, 3:51 PM by John Firth   [ updated Mar 1, 2012, 4:12 PM by JR Resolution ]

Convener:  John Firth

Participants: John Firth, Dinah Bowman, Karen Romano Youngm Paula Weiss, Sharon Cooper

Summary of Discussion:

It has been noticed that many scientific tools, as well as other man-made tools, are cylinders. Ocean Drilling uses a cylindrical pipe to recover cylindrical cores for study of the subsurface. So are logging tools that measure inside boreholes. So are airguns or waterguns that create sounds for seismic surveys of the subsurface. However, telescopes are cylinders as well, and microscopes, test tubes, pipettes, needles, catheters. In daily life, straws, drinking glasses, pens/pencils, painting brushes, cigarettes, cannon, guns, are also cylinders.  Tubing for fluids and gases within analytical instruments are all cylinders. we harness noncylndrical energy (electricity and light) using cylinders - i.e., wires for electricity, fiber optics for light.

we people view our world through cylinders way more than we may be aware of!

3 fundamental questions came up:

WHY? why do we use so many cylinders in science? -   we did not have answers for this. but we raised questions that may be useful for a student activity/day camp/class lesson.


SIGNIFICANCE: what is the significance of this particular shape for scientific activity as well as for daily life? IS THERE ANY SIGNIFICANCE?

again we dont have an answer for this, but the common use of cylinders raises questions that can help stimulate creativity and original thinking. this is fundamental for students of all ages to come up with new, alternative, sometimes better? ways of doing things, understanding things, presenting things,  communicating things, etc.


ALTERNATIVES?  What alternative shapes can be or could be used instead of cylinders to accomplish what cylinders accomplish for science, for ocean drilling science (and also for daily life).  this is just one shape.

IDEA: part of a science camp, maybe 1 day, maybe a lesson of a couple hours.

To areas to keep in mind:  (a) the focused are of clynidcal tools for ocean drilling science, (b) the broader area of cylinders in our world.  Point is to ask question and make tests/experiements to get students to think.

Q1:  what in nature is naturally cylindrical?

our answers, which are not comprehensive:  

-biological body parts:  esophagus and intestine parts of digestive tract; plus what they create(sometimes) is cylindrical shaped poop!(although sometimes it is like rabbit pellets;  blood vessels;  nerves/nerve cells;  procreational body parts

biological organisms:
worms - animals with natural cylindrical forms - both earthworms which are natural earth borers/corers, and deep sea tube worms; 

non-biological natural objects:  ??????

Q2: Why are there not many cylindrical objects in nature???

Q3: WHY are cylinders so commonly used as tools for humans, both in science research and in other aspects of life? - answer - again not fixed answer yet, but form follows function and current technology and design has used and still uses cylinders in manyan ways, as listed up top.

Q4: why are other forms other than cylinders not used for scientific research (and everyday life).

Q5: VERY IMPORTANT QUESTION - KEY TO ORIGINAL THINKING:

IF CYLINDERS DID NOT EXIST IN OUR WORLD, HOW COULD WE DO WHAT WE DO (IN SCIENCE, IN OCEAN DRILILNG SCIENCE, IN MEDICINE, IN EVERYDAY LIFE?)

Q6: WHAT WOULD OUR WORLD (NATURAL AND MAN-MADE) BE LIEK WITHOUT CYLINDERS? WHAT WOULD OUR KNOWLEDGE OF OUR WORLD BE LIKE?

Q7A: FOCUS ON OCEAN CORING:  WHAT DID PEOPLE USE IN EARLY TIMES TO SAMPLE THE SEAFLOOR AND SUBSURFACE OF LAND?  
    some answers: piston cores (cylinders) but also dredges, and box cores.  Also drill cores (early oil industry)?

Q7B: WHY do we use this cylindrical technology now? (picture this:  seismic picture, 2D or 3D of subsurface, with cylindrical wells and cores to subsample areas to 'groundtruth' remote sensing of subsurface.

Q7C: WHAT BETTER WAY COULD WE CREATE/BUILD TO ACCOMPLISH THIS SAME SCIENCE/ACTIVITY?


IDEAS FOR CAMP/I DAY LESSON/ETC:

FILLING A GLASS CYLINDER WITH VARIOUS MATERIALS - FLUIDS, SAND, CLAY, PUDDING, ETC. SEE WHAT HAPPENS TO THE VARIOUS MATERIALS AS THEY ARE ADDED TO  THE CYLINDER.  OR, MAKING A BOX FILLED WITH LAYERS OF VARIOUS MATERIALS (GRAVEL, CLAY, SAND, ETC.) OR BAKE A CAKE WITH THINGS IN IT (NUTS, FRUIT, ICING, CAKE ETC.)

COVER THESE ITEMS SO STUDENTS DO NOT KNOW WHAT IS INSIDE THEM.

LET THEM TAKE CORES OF THESE THINGS (USING STRAWS OR SOME OTHER DEVICE) AND SEE WHAT THEY BRING UP. SEE IF THEY CAN COMPARE CORES FORM DIFFERENT LOCATIONS OF THE BOX/CAKE/ETC. TO SEE IF THEY CAN RECREATE TEH ACTUAL SUBSURFACE CONTENT AND STRUCTURE OF THE THINGS BEING CORED.

ACTIVITY 2:  THIS IS THE HOLY GRAIL OF DRILLING ENGINEERS:  MANY CORES DO NOT GET 100% RECOVERY BECAUSE THE ROCKS/SEDIMENTS ARE TO HARD OR CRUMBLY OR SOFT OR WHATEVER, AND WE RECOVER ONLY SMALL PIECES OR BITS OF WHT LIES BELOW. HOW CAN WE IMPROVE OUR CORING TECHNOLOGY (WITH OR WITHOUT CYLINDERS) TO IMPROVE CORE RECOVERY?????

FOR EXAMPLE: COULD A VACUUM SYSTEM BE added to a CORING TOOL TO HELP SUCK UP MATERIAL AND HOLD IT IN THE CORE BARREL?


ACTIVITY 3: WHAT OTHER FORMS ARE USED FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY:

for example, conical shaped drillbits with hard knobs on tehm are used on the bottom of drill pipe to rotate at an angle, each separately, btu also each around a common rotation axis fo teh drill pipe. But these conseshaped cutters end up creating a cylindrrical hole and cylindrical core.

can other shapes be used to subsample and do all the things that cylindrical tools do in our present world?


Conclusions:

this is a thinking activity for out of the box challenges to discover why we use cylinders - are they the best tool, coudl other shaped become better tools, if not is there a 2nd-best shape for doing what cylinders do?

also, how does cylindrical science promote and expand out scientific knowledge through ocean drilling?





Next Steps:

create an activity for kids of a certain age (middle school, highschool?? - we dont know), to test the open ended questinos and see if they can rise to the challnege of understanding the importance of cylinders and see if there are other or better shapes that coudl improve our future science and future daily lives???

ISSUE #29: San Francisco Port Visit & Museum Educational Programming

posted Mar 1, 2012, 3:24 PM by Mark Andrews   [ updated Mar 1, 2012, 3:34 PM by Michael Herman ]

CONVENER: Mark Andrews

PARTICIPANTS: Dan Brinkhuis, Barbara Becker, Maria Murray, Jen Collins, Leslie Peart, Lisa Strong, Dinah Bowman, Patrice Ceisel, Karen Romero Young, Louise Phillips, Linda, Stefan Mrozewski

SUMMARY OF DISCUSSION:

- The Exploratorium is moving to Pier 15 on the San Francisco waterfront in April of 2013. At this new location, the museum will have a deep water dock and can potentially host the JR and collaborate with Ocean Leadership and others to facilitate tours, and develop a temporary exhibit and public program events based around the JR, its science and its crew.

- The JR has made port calls with public tours in other parts of the world (Hobart & Vancouver Island. e.g.) -- they have quite a bit of experience doing tours. We talked about the successes and challenges around those. 
- Tours have typically been 90 minutes, but perhaps that is long. Could definitely be shorter. 
- They have had 400-500 people a day take the tour. Could start multiple groups simultaneously at different spots on the ship. 
- Hobart port call with public tours was organized by a museum. (They could be a good contact to reflect on their experiences.)
- In Hobart, scientists gave tours. There was no active science (and SF port call would be the same). But cores were out on tables in lab for display. 
- The passport (with stamps) take-away was very popular. 

Logistical issues with docking:
- The ship is loud. (All the time.) It’s enough of an issue that they had to build port call plans around this sometimes. 
- It needs services: water, power, sewer.
- It’s big. 475 (approx.) feet. 
- It’s costly to dock. The longer in port, the more expensive. 
- It looks like an oil derrick. We wouldn’t want people mistaking it for one.

Tour could include the following:
- Tour stops: (1) catwalk & drill (2) Core lab w/ cores, (3) Stateroom, (4) Bridge
- Prevideo in conference room
- Short videos (video screens in strategic places) could be used to show lab activity (because lab will not be in action in port)
- Guest book for tours could be fun. 

What from the ship (objects, processes) can we bring off the ship into museum? 
- microscopes and slides with microfossils
- cores

- Could bring JR educator(s) and/or scientist(s) to San Francisco to participate during the ship visit.
- Could bring Exploratorium educator on board JR for expedition.

Ideas for temporary exhibit, program, and activities during ship visit:
- “Exhibitize” walkway from museum to ship
- Create signage for the exterior of the ship
- Signage on the Embacadero to announce/publicize ship visit
- As part of public program event(s), facilitate hands-on activities or workshops. Lots of good hands-on activities (and demos) using inexpensive materials have already been developed around JR science. Jakie Kane (sp?), for instance, has developed good stuff. An example is a cake coring activity to teach stratigraphy, etc. 
- Kick-off could include a celebration with music & dance. 

- Could tie existing Exploratorium exhibits to JR science. (Does the Exploratorium have any exhibits about sediments, geologic time, tectonics, climate history, etc. that could be moved into temporary JR installation and tied to its work?)
- Could potentially utilize the lab in the museum. (has microscopes, etc.) 
- Create temporary installation with atmospheric mutimedia piece(s) featuring the sounds of the ship.
- Look at the work that the Exploratorium’s new Observatory is doing involving SF Bay sediment cores. Perhaps SF Bay sediment core could be displayed side-by-side with JR cores. 
- Look at the Exploratorium’s Science of Sailing program in development and see if there is a tie-in. (Sailing + Ships?). And look at the Ship Tracker exhibit in development. 

- Look at Ciencia Viva’s shipping exhibit. (talk to Anna about it)

- Perhaps develop exhibit that involves running water through dirt down into trough, creating delta, doing cores through the delta. Stepan mentioned something like this has been created and is effective. Develop some kind of exhibit about sedimentation and strata. 
- Create some kind of contest: Derrick building contest? Kite design contest -- kite could go on board for on-board contest. 
- Create some kind of creative building project, or communal longer-term building project.
- Could add a “non-mathy” math tie-in. 
- Visitor-built rock garden
- Do a build-your-own ROV workshop and operate them in a kiddie pool. - Integrate “passport” into the experience. Maybe visitors could take photos from microscope and print out stickers from them. Stickers could be from microslide slides, the ship, their visit.










ISSUE #28: Engaging Diverse Communities

posted Mar 1, 2012, 3:01 PM by ship2 shore   [ updated Mar 1, 2012, 3:04 PM by Michael Herman ]

CONVENER(S): Suraida Nanez-James and Lee

 

PARTICIPANTS: Carrio Ferraro, Mary Andrusyk, Maria Murray, Stefan Mrozewski, Katerina Petronotis, Calvin Buchholtz, Stan Silverman, Mark Gleason, Jon Lewis, Louise Phillips, Emily Powell, Karen Thomson, Lee

 

SUMMARY OF DISCUSSION:

Main ideas that came out of discussion:

1. Survey/data on who we are currently serving

2. JR Mobile – take it to them!

3. Translation of materials

4. Community liaison/ambassador/regional hubs

a. Role models

b. Have different phases of implementation

5. ID partners that already work with communities we want to reach

i. National Society of Engineers

ii. SACNAS

iii. Boys and Girls Clubs

iv. GSG (Science for Girls)

v. IBD

vi. Faith based institutions

vii. Museums

viii. Community centers

ix. Business leaders

x. Local politicians

6. Need to build relationships/trust/connect/relate to group/population/community

7. Need for mentors, links to science

8. Career connections at ALL levels of educations

9. Different groups define:

a. Community as a whole/education of citizen

b. K-12 or K-gray

c. Teachers

d. Undergrad

e. Grads

10. Cultural competency rubric – some already exist to assess if our program is meeting this “criteria” for cultural competency

 

 

ISSUE #27: Dissemination of Information

posted Mar 1, 2012, 2:58 PM by Sarah Strano   [ updated Mar 1, 2012, 3:14 PM by Michael Herman ]

CONVENER(S): Sarah Strano 


PARTICIPANTS: Sharon Cooper, Kevin Kurtz, Carrie Ferraro, Lee Peters, Karen Thomson, Mary Andrusek, Jon Lewis, Matt Wright


SUMMARY OF DISCUSSION:


How does JR already disseminate information?


  • go to conferences
  • Facebook page
  • So much info coming through
  • Need to focus on how to build relationship with community of members.
  • Need to develop ambassadors and figure out how they can communicate with public.
  • What can the ambassadors promise?
  • They need to highlight and point to certain things that they know are reliable for education and other known and consistent deliverables.
  • Twitter
  • Listserv
  • IODP


What do we need?


  • Tools
  • Website-try to make it one, or connected easily
  • Portal site
  • Link for journalists
  • Link for scientists 
  • For educators
  • Possibly clarify that there exists this variety/hierarchy of organizations 
  • use of a possible schematic
  • Pretty and simple schematic
  • Explain relationship between deep earth/school of rock/IODP/JR
  • This will let new people make decisions about whether they want to understand the context of the JR or not, but it's their choice...
  • look at terms and standards for states and use search engine optimization to make it easier to find the website when it is googled
  • Have these sites linked to sites for Woods Hole, Scripps (USCD), Lamont, COAS. Develop relationship with media contact at these institutions and other similar research facilities.
  • Need a best practices guide in order to ensure predictability for PR and education and aid the education officer on board ship.  Pick up the good talent on board and use them.


Who is the audience?


  • What different organizations and what hierarchies exist? We need to know this so that one central hub or portal can be developed. Should the general public be made aware all of the hierarchies or is the JR site the best solution so that we can avoid cross and/or contradictory branding? If the JR is the brand, how should it be branded? Wikipedia gets lots of attention and is now more reliable. We need to get more links to the JR on there.
  • Where do most people go to get ocean sciences lessons and information? NOAA, NASA, FOSS, SERC
  • Talking to someone face-to-face is really useful, citing something on something like NISEnet (Nanoscale informal science education network)
  • NSF seeks broader impacts - make regional hub(s) and/or package as kits


Press releases:


  • Make JR a consistent brand so there is some consistency in terms of public perception.
  • Link for Educators will be dynamic when the ship is operating
  • Full-time social media/educator can do that


Tangible ideas for pilots:


  • What can we produce as a pilot project that can be used to test whether we're disseminating information more effectively both through the new web portal and through some sort of JR traveling museum exhibit and/or very hands-on activity at a fair that could even be held in a gymnasium.
  • Regional tour of pilot version of ocean sciences fair (i.e. small budget) generating involvement and publicity by partnering with ISIs, youth organizations, after school programs, ISIs. This is good way to reach diverse populations and enlist the organizations' emphasis on sevice (troops hosting fairs, helping reach, younger kids, etc.)
  • Need quantifiable metric for measuring whether we're actually getting information to the public. 


Potential metrics:


  • Projected goals - similar to pilot but on bigger more permanent scale, potential resulting 4 science pods that are housed and used around country.
  • A JR mobile that teaches ocean sciences around country and takes advantage of network of ambassadors who were previous education officers, staff scientists, graduate students and any others who want to participate and help make a day of family fun and learning around the country.  Partnering with youth organizations (e.g. Girls scouts, boys and girls clubs), afterschool programs, ISIs, etc. 
  • National level placement (e.g. Boy scout badge; girl scout manual, 4h merit)
  • Build traveling model ship out of Lego and get Lego to sell model JR


Other thoughts:


  • We need to be good at attracting like NASA.
  • Need to attract attention (big news story, or something that can make a splash).
  • Use ambassadors/alumni network.
  • Use overseas ports of call as hook to engage immigrant communities of that ethnicity. 
  • Use other organizations to find you.
  • Use social media to find you.
  • Dissemination/outreach officer? Is this a permanent role? Temporary? Expedition specific? Could we write this salary in as part of a grant?
  • Potential metric: how many funded proposals use deep earth academy in their broader impacts? (could be a canned thing)

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