Personal Gear Guide

SMART Personal Equipment List/Gear Guide

Adapted from

TN-1 DMAT Guide By: Jonathan Malloch V7.6  

Greetings Motivated and Prepared Team Mates.  Hopefully here you will find some assistance in putting together your deployment kit.  Section 1 is the basic kit and includes a checklist of the minimum gear you will need for a deployment.  Section 2 is a comprehensive list, essentially a compendium of extensive feedback and personal experience.  While it is lengthy, and perhaps excessive, it is only a guideline for the development of your personal deployment kit. Section 3 is a general discussion of luggage requirements and the rationale for such. Section 4 is a discussion of particular items on the list in an effort to help you select the best product for the conditions and the best value for your money. When deployment orders are issued, simply print out the checklist and check it off as you pack.  As always, take from the knowledge of your teammates and leadership.  Never hesitate to ask questions.  As well, share your knowledge.  This list is dynamic and always improving and your feedback is welcomed.  

   Section 1 

Jump Bag:

1 BDU Pants,1 Team Shirt, Boots sock liner and socks

Rain Jacket and Pants

Work gloves

Eye Protection/safety glasses

Hearing protection: (soft ear plugs for work in and around aircraft and day sleeping)

Headlamp * with a spare bulb (Unless Multi- LED)

Spare Batteries

Medical Equipment, Personal: (Stethoscope/EMT Scissors/hemostat/gloves etc.)

Notepad w/ pen or pencil

Sharpie / Waterproof marker

ZIP LOCK with the following:

Medications: Prescription and Non-Prescription

Extra Contact lenses/glasses

Sun block

Chapstick

Hand wipes

Band-Aids: Fabric type

Matches, Waterproof.

Water Purification tabs

Sunglasses

Sleep Mask / Bandana (for night shift day sleepers)

Camera

Reading material

Playing cards/travel games

Cell phone charger (car and wall or converter)

Trash Bag, large 1: (use as a bag cover, emergency rain gear or bivy)

Duct Tape/gaffers tape: (Wal-Mart sells 10 yard rolls about the size of a deck of cards)

Rope: Paracord, 50 ft

Chem lightsticks, 3

On Your Person:

Team I.D., Drivers License / Wallet / Money/Credit cards

SMRT Emergency Contact card

Watch

Critical Medications / Allergy Information-bracelet or allergy dog tag

Pocket size notebook / log book

Pen/ Sharpie / Waterproof marker

Cell Phone

Cell Phone Carrier:* (Soft, unbreakable type. NOT PLASTIC)

BEFORE YOU TRAVEL:

Make a photocopy of all important documents and cards: Lay the contents of your wallet

on a photocopier and copy front and back. Leave a copy at your home in a secure place

and a copy with someone you trust who you can contact if your wallet is lost or stolen 

 
Main Bag

Clothing:   

  2 BDU pants, 2 Shirts Season appropriate (SEPA orange team shirts)

  Hats, Boonie type / Ball Cap / Watch Cap – (seasonal).   

  Underwear – 2 *

  Socks - 2

  Belt, Black – 1

  Boots*

  Civilian Clothing:  1 set (pants, shirt, and socks)

Toiletries:    

  Toothbrush

  Toothpaste

  Razor w/ blades

  Shave cream

  Soap

  Shampoo

  Deodorant: (unscented attracts less bugs)

Miscellaneous:

  Flashlight: (it doesn’t have to be big, just reliable and water tight) 

  Batteries:  (don’t buy “Heavy Duty” they last ½ the time of regular batteries)

  

 

 

 

 

 

Section 2         

 Personal Equipment Checklist – Comprehensive:

CHECKLIST:  BOLD is required gear (The Fast Pack list).  The rest is highly recommended but optional. ( * see reference notes for discussion of certain items)  

 Main Bag:

Clothing:   

  Uniforms – 2 sets: (2 BDU pants, 3  orange team shirts 2 BDU blouses)

    (Depending on travel orders, you may be wearing one full set of uniform clothing)

   Hats, Boonie type AND Team Ball Cap – (Both are preferred).

   Underwear – 2 *

   Socks - 2

   Belt, Black – 1

  Sock Liners 2 *   

  Compression Bag, Clothing type: (Coleman 3 pack at Wal-Mart for < $10 or Eagle Creek)*

  Shower shoes / Flip-flops / Tevas etc. 1

  Civilian Clothing:  1 set (pants, shorts, shirt, socks etc.)

  Sleepwear (scrubs, shorts, t-shirt etc.)

  Swimwear 

  Tennis Shoes

 Cold Weather Clothing:  (optional and weather dependent)

   Field Jacket/ Parka, Polarguard or similar, NOT DOWN (weather dependent) 

   Jacket, synthetic fleece

   Pants, synthetic fleece

   Gloves, synthetic fleece

  Socks, Synthetic: winter weight NOT COTTON

   Thermal underwear, synthetic NOT COTTON

   Hat/cap, wool or synthetic

 Main Bag Continued:

Toiletries:    

   Toothbrush

   Toothpaste

   Razor w/ blades

   Shave cream

   Soap

   Shampoo

   Deodorant: (unscented attracts less   bugs)

    {Feminine Hygiene products}

   Hand wipes  

   Floss: (can double as high strength sowing thread)

   Foot powder

   Moleskin

   Toilet Paper/paper towels: (several yards inside a zip lock to keep it dry)

   Insect repellent: (3M Ultrathon available at Wal-Mart) 

   Sun block

   Chapstick

   Tums/antacids

   Comb/brush

   Washcloth *

   Towel *

   Safety pins (3 large)

   Small Mirror: (unbreakable travel type)

   Meds:  Prescription and Non prescription pain relievers; Tylenol, Advil, etc

   Spare Glasses in hard case

   Spare Contact Lenses

   Contact Lens Solution

   Hearing protection:  soft earplugs (essential for day sleepers during shift work)

Sleep Gear:

   Sleeping bag * (optional) SEPA SMRT  has disposable sleeping bags

   Compression Bag*  

   Mattress Pad, Foam or Air *

   Pillow *

   Ground Cloth (A military poncho doubles as an excellent ground cloth and shelter)

  Miscellaneous:

  Flashlight: (it doesn’t have to be big, just reliable and water tight) 

  Batteries:  (don’t buy “Heavy Duty” they last ½ the time of regular batteries)

  Plastic Mug and Spoon  

   Rope: 50 ft.  (“550 Paracord” is a great multi-use rope)

   Laundry Bag

   Laundry Detergent: *

   Sewing repair kit: small kit with 2-3 large safety pins

   Duct Tape/gaffers tape:  (Wal-Mart sells 10 yard rolls about the size of a deck of cards)

   Garbage Bags:* (3, Large, 45-55 gallon type)

   Zip lock Bags:* (3, one gallon freezer bags.  3, one-quart freezer bags.)  

   Fire:  (Lighter, Waterproof Matches, magnesium starter and striker, etc.)

   Knife:  (Folding pocket type) 

   Leatherman type tool (optional) 

   Power Strip plug* (optional) (Wal-Mart $5 or less)

 Jump Bag:

   Rain Jacket and Pants

   1 BDU Pants,1 Team Shirt, sock liner and socks

   Boots* 

   Work gloves

   Eye Protection/safety glasses

  Hearing protection:  (soft ear plugs for work in and around aircraft and day sleeping)

   Headlamp * with a spare bulb

   Spare Batteries

  Medical Equipment, Personal: (Stethoscope/EMT Scissors/hemostat/gloves etc.)

  Water:  1 quarts (Nalgene water bottles or hydration system)

   Snacks:  High energy, Snickers, Peanut M&M’s, 

   Notepad w/ pen or pencil

   Sharpie / Waterproof marker

    ZIP LOCK with the following: 

   Medications:  Prescription and Non-Prescription

  Extra Contact lenses/glasses

  Sun block

   Chapstick

   Hand wipes

   Band-Aids: Fabric type

              Matches, Waterproof. 

               Water Purification tabs 

   Sunglasses

   Sleep Mask / Bandana (for night shift day sleepers)

   Camera

   Reading material

   Playing cards/travel games

   Cell phone charger (car and wall or converter)

   Trash Bag, large 1: (use as a bag cover, emergency rain gear or bivy) 

   Duct Tape/gaffers tape:  (Wal-Mart sells 10 yard rolls about the size of a deck of cards)

   Rope:  Paracord, 50 ft

   Chem lightsticks, 3

   Helmet (optional)

   Knee Pads (optional)

   Compass (optional)

   Whistle (optional)

 On Your Person:

   Team I.D., Drivers License / Wallet / Money/Credit cards

   SMRT Emergency Contact card 

   Watch

   Critical Medications / Allergy Information-bracelet or allergy dog tag

   Pocket size notebook / log book

   Pen/ Sharpie / Waterproof marker

   Cell Phone

   Cell Phone Carrier:* (Soft, unbreakable type.  NOT PLASTIC)

 BEFORE YOU TRAVEL:

 Make a photocopy of all important documents and cards:  Lay the contents of your wallet

on a photocopier and copy front and back.  Leave a copy at your home in a secure place

and a copy with someone you trust who you can contact if your wallet is lost or stolen.   

Section 3 

 OBJECTIVE:

 The objective in developing your personal gear is to enable you and your team is to be self sufficient in nearly any conditions for approximately 3 days or 72 hours.  After that time it is generally accepted that additional supplies will become available.  To somewhat complicate this is the fact that team members are somewhat  limited in how much weight we can carry and how many bags are allowed.   A basic load should include: 2 bags, sufficient for 3 days, including  quarts of water.  Current NTSB  restrictions on water may require flexibility when oncommercial aircraft.  Also, we assume and some sort of shelter will be available, hence personal tents will not be discussed here.       

 Equipment Bags/Luggage:    

 You will need one main bag (large 6,000-10,000 cubic inch or a bag with dimensions of approx.15x30x15 inches to 16x36x16 inch or a similar sized suitcase) WITH WHEELS and one smaller “ready bag/jump bag” that you will carry with you on your flight or in your vehicle 

The main bag will be checked for air travel and/or may be palletized for transport via military air or ground convoy; hence, it may not always be readily available to you.  The Jump Bag will stay with you.   

Main Bag Considerations:

 Many times I(Jonathan Malloch) have watched teammates literally carrying 90+ pounds of gear through huge airports wishing they had a bag with wheels.  With a minimum Fast Pack your main bag can run 25-35 lbs.  For the Comprehensive Pack out, your bag may weigh 50-70 pounds fully loaded depending on how you outfit yourself.  Likewise, I have seen team bags come off the luggage belt in shreds, with straps broken, seams burst, or simply abraded through not due to abuse, rather it was simply not the quality needed for this type of travel and weight.  Standing in an abandoned airport with no power for 300 miles with your gear in a pile is the wrong time to figure out the $50 dollars you saved buying a “bargain” bag was a bad idea.  imay be to get a replacement for some time.

 I(Jonathan Malloch) have personally purchased and test packed no less than 10 Main Bags before some great onesemerged.  They have ranged from $60-$300.  You DO NOT have to spend $300 for a good bag. I have below linked a few excellent bags.  THESE ARE ONLY SUGGESTIONS to get you pointed in the right direction and provide visual examples of what we are discussing.  The final decision is yours.  I’ve tried a lot of bags that failed to support the weight or volumes loaded in them. I’m sure there are many more excellent bags that I have yet to try.  Additionally, I’ve tried many bags that have excellent zippers, good wheels and tough nylon that failed at the frame due to weight.  As in, the bottom simply bends under the weight of the load.  Avoid bags that don’t have very rigid bottoms or internal frames or rails that run the length of the bag to the wheel end.  Some very excellent examples of good bags are listed below.

 Main Bag Examples: 

 High Sierra 36” Drop Bottom Rolling Duffel:  This can usually be seen at Sierra Trading Post and Campmor.  The High Sierra 36” Drop Bottom Rolling Duffel is a very nice bag with aLifetime Warranty.  This bag normally retails for near $200, but can sometimes found for under$70 here.  I have one with several deployments on it as do several team members and it’s a great bag for the money. 

http://www.sierratradingpost.com  

http://www.campmor.com

 BlackHawk Enhanced Diver's Travel Bag:  Several of the team members have these and are very happy with them.  I’ve seen them for less than $150.  This is an outstanding bag w/ a lifetime warranty. (See Chief Security Officer Greg Smith for current pricing)  

http://www.blackhawk.com/product1.asp?P=21DT

 Cabelas Extreme Wheeled Duffel: This bag is utterly bombproof, has a lifetime warranty and is worth the price but it is expensive.  You will likely never need another one in your life.   

www.cabelas.com

 L.L. Bean and Land End also have some higher quality very rugged rolling duffels starting around $120.  These have lifetime warranties. 

www.llbean.com

www.landsend.com

 The North Face, MountainSmith, Mountain Hardware and Eagle Creek are some of the finest

bags available.  They tend to be expensive and come with lifetime warranties.  

www.thenorthface.com

www.mountainsmith.com

www.mountainhardware.com

www.eaglecreek.com

 Ready Bag/Jump bag   

This can be a simple backpack/daypack (preferred) or medium size duffel. 

Experience proves that having your hands free makes the backpack a better choice.  It should 

be approx. 1200-3500 cubic inches.  You may carry it aboard the plane and will check at the

aircraft door, put it under your seat or in the overhead bin.  It should be able to hold at least 1 quart of your water supply (many bags now incorporate internal hydration systems, which are great for field work in conditions where you may be at risk for dehydration).  It will also need to be able to accommodate sufficient gear for you to remain fairly comfortable and operational should your main bag be lost or delayed.  Contents should include: stethoscope, medic scissors, medical gloves etc., Energy food/snacks, water and reasonable comfort essentials such as a zip lock w/ dry socks, dry underwear, and baby wipes etc.  It should contain basic protective

essentials such as a rain poncho/parka, gloves, eye protection, hearing protection, sun block, anda few other things that will be specifically outlined later.  

 Jump Bag Examples:   

 Mountain Smith Approach II: This is about 2500 cubic inches and very comfortable.  I have

one that is so far, quite durable.  Can be found for around $60 if you look, it normally retails for

about $100.    

http://store.yahoo.com/fulfillmentadventures/backpacks.html

 Kelty's "Redwing" is a very popular backpack and has year after year proved to be an excellent

pack for both deployment and personal travel. These are also available at Dicks and REI and

other outdoor equipment stores.   

www.kelty.com

www.REI.com

 Spec Ops makes very good equipment, and is U.S. made. The “ T.H.E. Pack” (The Holds

Everything Pack) is a very tough bag.  You can view and try on this pack at GT distributors in

Rossville Georgia (about 10 minutes from Erlanger Hospital in Chattanooga and it can be had for

just over $100.)  Some team members carry this bag and are very happy with it.  

www.specopsbrand.com/main.html

 Camelbak BFM, HAWG and the Motherlode:  These are excellent choices and have extensive

field use.  They are worth the price and hold up very well.  They can also be seen at GT

Distributors in Rossville Georgia.  Several team members use the Motherlode and the comfort,

versatility and value is exceptional.  Best price on Motherlode is around $140 if you look. 

www.camelbak.com

 BlackHawk: Several styles available and offers excellent quality. 

www.blackhawk.com