Seong-Eun Kim, Ph.D.    
     
     Postdoctoral Associate
  
     Massachusetts Institute of Technology
     Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
    
    Postdoctoral Affiliate
      
    Harvard Medical School / Massachusetts General Hospital
     Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine 
 
                                      

Short Bio

Seong-Eun Kim received the B.S. and Ph.D. degree in the department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering from the Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Korea in 2004 and 2010, respectively. During Ph.D. program, he had worked under the supervision of Professor Woo-Jin Song at the Communications and Signal Processing Lab, POSTECH, and developed high-performance adaptive filtering algorithms and performed their statistical performance analysis for applications to echo cancellation, active noise cancellation, and channel identification, and even for distributed estimation over adaptive networks. Seong-Eun has also worked with LG Display to develop an automatic backlight dimming algorithm for LCD TVs. Before joining this lab, he has been a Research Staff Member in the Future IT Research Center at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), and developed particle / Kalman filters to localize smartphones in buildings using embedded geo-magnetism sensor, inertial measurement unit (IMU), and WiFi signals.

Seong-Eun is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Neuroscience Research Laboratory in the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT. He is also affiliated with the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at MGH. He has been working on the neuroscience of sleep and anesthesia under the supervision of Professor Emery N. Brown. His research focuses on how infant's brain responses under general anesthesia in contrast with adults using EEG recordings in pediatric patients receiving general anesthesia. Seong-Eun is also interested in developing statistical and computational methods to analyze neural data. The study has led to a more precise delineation of the spectral signatures of general anesthesia induced by anesthetic drugs. He is also developing automatic systems for administering anesthetic drugs and controlling general anesthesia.


Contact

Office: 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 46-6057A (NSRL), Cambridge, MA 02139
Email:  sekim(at)mit.edu
Tel:      (617) 324-1881 (Office)