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USE THE “A” FOR GREAT OUTDOOR PHOTOS

Are you still using that “instant” digital camera outdoors?  Does your DSLR Nikon or Cannon intimidate you?  Pro photographers use a zoom lens set in “Aperture Priority” for showpiece results.  Aperture Priority reads as “A” or AV” on your camera dial.  It’s easy to use if you memorize three basic points.  Suppose you’re shooting a parrot with a telephoto lens.  You decide you want the parrot (in the foreground) to be in focus and the trees and leaves (the background), out of focus.  Set your aperture to the smallest number your lens will allow (such as f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, etc.) and then focus on the parrot.  The camera will do the rest.  You’ll have a wonderful parrot photo with the artistic effect you were looking for.   What if you want both parrot and trees to be in focus?  Move your aperture to either f/8 or f/11.  This will shoot the scene closer to what your eyes actually see (with only the really far things out of focus.)  Finally, if you want everything (foreground, middle and background) in focus, use the highest number your lens will allow (f/22, f/36 etc.)  What all this means is that the smaller F-stop numbers will give you a more concentrated area of focus.

COFFEE LOVERS, ENJOY THAT 2ND CUP

Recent research from Rutgers University has found that a combination of exercise and caffeine might help destroy precancerous skin cells.  Well caffeinated mice, charged with an equivalent of one - two cups of coffee per day, were exposed to UVB rays after exercising and then compared to non-caffeinated exercised mice.  Results showed that the caffeinated mice had a 400% increase in the destruction of precancerous cells.  (The study also found smaller risk reductions in caffeine-only or exercise-only mice).
See Health.com 2007.

THE BUZZ ABOUT NON-TOXIC PEST CONTROL

Bee man Richie Gerber is all about sustainable industries.  His company BeeCeuticals Organics manufactures personal care products in an environmentally friendly manner and sponsors the planting of “trees for bees, please” (to provide food for pollinators). Richie is a logical source of information when in comes to handling things in a healthy manner, and he recommends Mark Rubin’s pest control service.  “Imagine – nothing poisonous to humans or animals,” Richie enthused.  A phone call to Rubin confirmed that there are natural agents that repel insects and vermin as effectively as chemical agents.  “It’s just a question of taking time to find the right solution for the problem at hand.”  For more information about a greener way to control pests, contact A Nature's Best Organic Pest at (954) 587-5612. 


TRAFFIC CONGESTION REPORTS:  Traffic.com, 866-MY-TRAFC. 

Drivers in the country’s 50 biggest cities (including PB, FL & Miami areas) can call in for real-time reports on area traffic conditions. Using voice recognition, you identify your city, the road and the direction you’re traveling. After a short ad, the service tells you whether there’s a delay on the road and how long the wait is. This toll-free service gives more information than the radio.

REAL PEOPLE ANSWER REAL QUESTIONS -- ANY QUESTION, VIA PHONE

Auburn University’s Foy Information Line, 334-844-4244, will answer any question (well, just about) 24 hours a day during the school year.  Manned by Auburn University students in Alabama, the students use Internet and reference books to make this a no-holds-barred information database.  The hot line, named after the Foy Student Union building, started in the 1950s as a resource for Auburn students. Questions come from callers as far away as Australia and range from how many Oreos it would take to circle the globe to what’s the longest nontechnical word in the English language?

CAN’T NAME THAT TUNE? 

Call Golden oldie 866-411-SONG.  Don’t go crazy trying to figure out names of songs.  Hold the phone up to the song for 15 seconds. The service will send you a text message complete with title and artist. The first try is free; after that you’ll be billed 99 cents per text message.

STOP UNWANTED SNAIL JUNK MAIL

The following web sites are from a Sun-Sentinel article, Business Section in November 2007:
1.  Free: Sign onto CatalogChoice.org – then choose unwanted catalogs.  The web site will communicate to the catalog companies and get you off their mailing lists.
2.  $1: Direct Marketing Association or https://www.dmachoice.org/MPS will remove your name for $1
3.  $41: www.41pounds.org – promises to reduce junk mail for five years for a $41 fee (average pp. is 41 lbs. per year).


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