Sen. Hank Sanders

Number 1583 - October 11, 2017          

                          
             
         
                Vision is powerful.  Vision is really, really powerful.  Vision helps us to know where we are going to.  Vision helps us to understand where we are coming from.  Vision helps us to know where we are in relation to where we are going and where we are coming from.  Vision helps us to know how to take what we have and make what we need to get to where we are going.  Vision helps us know that it is not what we are going through but what we are going to.  Vision is really, really powerful.

            Where there is no vision, the people perish.  These words are found in Proverbs 29:18 of the King James Bible.  Without a vision, the people perish because they do not know where they are going.  Without a vision, the people perish because they do not know where they are in relationship to where they need to be.  Without a vision, the people perish because they do not understand that the hardships they are going through are not what they are going to.  Without a vision, the people perish because they do not understand that the resources they have are sufficient to get them where they need to go.  Vision is really, really powerful.

            To illustrate these powers of vision, let’s explore the example of people escaping from slavery.  They usually traveled at night.  Most people perceived that they traveled at night to avoid detection.  And there may be some truth in this perception.  However, vision was the main reason those escaping slavery traveled at night.  Their vision was freedom and freedom lay in the North.  The guide to Freedom was the North Star.  Vision is really, really powerful.

People escaping from slavery knew that to reach freedom, they had to keep moving toward the north.  However, without a vision they could not know the direction in which they needed to travel.  The North Star became a guiding vision.  But they could not see the North Star during the day.  They could only see it at night.  Vision guides us through the darkness in our lives.  The darker the night, the brighter the vision.  Vision is really, really powerful.

            Thousands of people escaping from slavery started from many different locations yet they all moved in the same direction because of the vision of freedom symbolized by the North Star.  When people escaping from slavery were chased by slave catchers and had to run in all directions for safety, they could always get back on track to freedom by just following the North Star.  When people escaping from slavery came to rivers or swamps that blocked their path and they had to go in various directions to get over or around the obstacles, they could always get back on track to freedom by following the vision symbolized by of the North Star.  Vision is really, really powerful.

            Because of the North Star, those escaping from slavery always knew the right direction to go.  There is great security in knowing that we are going in the right direction. In addition to direction, vision provides security.  Escaping from slavery was fraught with danger.  Just knowing that they were going in this right direction increased their sense of security.  Vision is really, really powerful. 

The vision represented by the North Star helped those escaping from slavery to know what they had to do in order to get to where they were going.  They had to keep moving north.  They had to avoid being caught.  They had to work together to protect and support one another.  They did not perish because they had a vision.  Vision is really, really powerful.

The vision of freedom helped those escaping from slavery to endure hard times.  They had to walk great distances.  They had to travel at night.  Sometimes they did not have food to eat or water to drink.  They had to brave the ever present threats of other human being trying to return them to slavery.  They had to brave poisonous snakes and dangerous wild animals in the forest.  But they could keep going because no matter how great the hardships, they knew that it was not what they were going through but the freedom they were going to.  Vision is really, really powerful.

If the people escaping slavery did not have a vision, they would certainly have perished.  The vision kept them moving in the right direction.  The vision kept them moving in spite of great hardships.  The vision kept them working together to reach freedom.  The vision kept them hopeful.  The vision kept the people in an extremely dangerous situation from perishing.  Vision is really, really powerful.

Legal slavery ended one hundred and fifty-two years ago, but vision is no less critical in these perilous times.  Therefore, I am bound to ask: “What is our vision in these times?  Do we have a vision that keeps us moving in the right direction?  Do we have a vision that helps us through hard times?  Do we have a vision that helps us turn to each other rather than on each other?  Do we have a vision that focuses our minds, strengthens our spirits and orders our steps?”  These are questions that each of us must answer.  However, the vision must be for a people, not just an individual.  If we don’t have such a vision, the people will surely perish.  Vision is really, really powerful.  But lack of vision is also powerful because it causes us to perish.

Now on to the Daily Diary:

Saturday, September 30, 2017 – I walked two miles, performed home duties, went to my Selma office, handled many matters as I worked into the night.  Among others, I communicated with the following; Wallace Community College Selma (WCCS) President Dr. James Mitchell; Greene County Commissioner Lester Brown; Khadijah Ishaq and Faya Rose Toure of Selma; and Charles Sanders of Bibb County

Sunday – I did The Sunday School Lesson with Dr. Margaret Hardy and Radio Education with Perry County Superintendent John Heard, III, took my granddaughter, Ayyanna on a brief outing, shared Sunday Dinner with Brenda Miles, Sarah Jones, Dorita Lynn Clay and others and worked into the night.

Monday – I walked, read Sketches on Faya’s Fire Radio Program, had lunch with Ollion “Trell” Wright on his birthday and worked into the night.  Among others, I communicated with the following:  Joe Ritch of Huntsville on his birthday; Carolyn Wheeler of Tennessee on the 5th Anniversary of the passing of her husband; Elouise Robinson of Baldwin County whose former husband and father of her children was in a bad auto accident; Senator Vivian Davis Figures; Lowndes County School Superintendent Dr. Daniel Boyd; Josh Blades of Montgomery; Greene County School Superintendent Dr. James Carter; Joe Espy of Montgomery; Vivian Jones of Dallas County; Greene County School Board members Dr. Carol P. Zippert and Leo Branch; Alecha Irby of Miles College; Jason Copeland of Gadsden; and K.C. Bailey of Selma.

Tuesday – I handled many matters, participated in a morning conference call and a night conference call and worked deep into the night.  Among others, I communicated with the following: Minister Mae Richmond of Dallas County; Senator Harri Anne Smith whose mother passed; former Lowndes County Commissioner Brent Crenshaw; Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox; Carolyn Mugar of Boston; Dr. Ernest Okeke and Sherrie Mitchell of Selma; former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Sue Bell Cobb; U.S. Senate Democratic Nominee Doug Jones; Andy Marks of Washington, D.C.; and Greg Foster of Birmingham

Wednesday – I walked, handled many matters, participated in several meetings, did Law Lesson on Z105.3 with Attorney Malika Fortier, traveled to Greene County, returned to Selma and worked deep into the night.  Among others, I communicated with the following:  Kay Dierlam of Montgomery on her birthday; Robert Turner of Bullock/Macon Counties; Tom Coker of Lowndes County; Greene County Commissioners Tennyson Smith, Allen Tuner, Jr., and Corey Cockrell; Selma Businessman William Scott; Greene County School Board members William Morgan and Carrie Dancy; Paula Bird of Greene County; and Phyllis Belcher of the Greene County Industrial Development Authority.

Thursday – I walked, handled many matters, participated in various meetings, traveled to Lowndes County for a business lunch meeting with Sharon Wheeler and Carolyn Wheeler of Montgomery/Signal Mountain, Tennessee, returned to Selma, participated in a Vote or Die rally and a Vote or Die conference call and worked into the night.  Among others, I communicated with the following:  John Tanner of Washington, D.C. on his birthday; Gloria Pompey, Veronica Williams, Annie Pearl Avery and Karen Jackson of Selma; Franklin Fortier of Z105.3 FM Radio;  Rev. Leodis Strong of Brown Chapel AME Church; Tamara Hill, Dan Thompson and Josephine Curtis of Selma; Gerrie Wofford, Rev. Lawrence Woffard, Sam Walker, and Lola Swell of Selma; John Zippert of Alabama New South Coalition; and Perry Hooper, Jr. of Montgomery on his birthday.

Friday – I did a photo session at Edmund Pettus Bridge for the Vote or Die Movement, participated in a meeting with Dallas County and local elected officials.  Among others, I communicated with the following: Dallas County Probate Judge Kim Ballard;  Dallas County Commissioners Curtis Williams and Roy Moore; Dallas County Board of Education Members Mark Story and Bill Minor; Selma City Board of Education Member Johnny Moss and Superintendent Dr. Avis Williams; Ron Jones of the Office of Examiners of Public Accounts; Lorraine Capers of Selma; and Hale County Circuit Judge Marvin Wiggins.

Epilogue – Vision is very invisible in our daily lives in spite of its great power.  So many of us do not realize that we are without a vision.  We do realize that we may be perishing, but we do not understand that it is because we are without a vision.