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Making of The Slant v1.2

001 - The Slant Project

Initial Requirements

  • no slip, no shine
  • ambidextrous – switching hands, or passing the slingshot to someone else
  • flat body – to wear in the pocket - and warm it up on cold days
  • cast aluminum – my taste
  • carefully designed center of mass - ZEN
  • weight in 180-250 grams range – no fatigue but stabile shots, also EDC kept in mind
  • flat profile clips – focus on performance and ergonomics
  • thumb support and pinch grip
  • OTT flats only – low forks, compact head, better for using clips
  • belt clip that makes the carry easier
  • ammo preload option – one in the chamber - belt clip
  • no board cut
  • handmade stuff and classic manufacturing processes combined with edge tech

Challenges

  • wide tips makes difficult to create a matching handle proportion
  • full sized frame needs to be thin to reduce overall weight – have to find out where to make it thinner or thicker
  • must be comfortable for long shooting sessions like weekend or competitive shooting
  • clip needs to handle a wide variety of elastics – TBB, TBG, Thera tubes, Linatex, double flats, Dankung singles
  • using aluminum casting and 3D printing as production processes
Seljan - The Slant - Concept Sketch

This first image shows the initial sketch. I was working on matching the ideas with the functions and functions with forms. The original shape came quite fast, but spent more time than a year on details...

Seljan - The Slant - Concept Sketch

Clip was tricky. It's not a problem if you make a one off slingshot for your needs but I wanted to work with TBG, Linatex, TheraTubes, Dankung, so it gave me a headache.

Seljan - The Slant - Concept Sketch, clips 2

I was playing a lot with different orientation, angle, position of the screw. Also made a couple prints you will see later.

Seljan - The Slant - Proof of Concept model

This was the original bamboo cut that I made for testing how it shoots. Proof of concept model as fast as possible. It was funny at the tips but was super to shoot from the first time.

Seljan - The Slant - Clips idea

Matchstick & groove with zip tie -"Make it fast, make it work!"

Seljan - The Slant - Drafting

When the proof of concept was ready and I used it for a couple days in a row I was starting the CAD work. CAD is cool, but it is the slowest work and you always have to redo things. Working with hands are way better, but you can't make enough iteration. Anyway, I wanted to create a 3D model, to be printed out and test the details. Also pointed my focus to remove any board-cut feature.

Seljan - The Slant - Drafting

As you see I had the basic outline first, then started to working out the tips and mounts. The "private" symbol on the right was made as calibration feature for center of mass. It gave me a daaaaam' headache during the casting process.

Seljan - The Slant - Drafting

The image up there shows the features modified at the bottom. I was not sure about how can I mount the belt clips, but started to develop a platform at the bottom. It was a VERY exciting part to design. A tiny freaking detail that was a big question from the beginning. I wanted to avoid to create a hole because that looks bad to this design. But the hole can be drilled so easy. I ended up with a stadium curve but had to make sure the melted aluminum can fill these areas, was not easy to find the right dimensions for the handle.

Seljan - The Slant - Drafting

Main 3 steps of the belt clip. The first on the left was my basic idea, but the form was so soft and looking weak. Don't get me wrong, I like curves, but not for this slingshot. It was much more a "stealth style" design.


002 - Print it out loud

Story

I was excited after testing the bamboo cut and having the basic form. But was afraid of 3D printing the frame. It was a full sized stuff but quite minimalist and when something looks good on a screen I'm usually nervous because that does not mean too much in practice. Happened many times.

Print or not to print

I was making a hollow model and built up the interior structure to generate support. I only wanted to test how it feels, but I had luck and it was a great shooter from the first. But back on the track. Why is that question? Print or not to print? My concern was: the print is TOO different form aluminum and even if it works well it is not the same. A 3D print is hard to compare to an aluminum cast. Different surface, weight, temperature, strength, momentum etc. Anyway I thought it's a good idea to print it out as soon as possible and let we see if it's good for the task.

AC/DC

Shook me all night long. Before i started the preparation for casting I was spent quite a lot intimate days with her. It was like a beginning of a relationship. It was actually. I've spent long months and will spend more with her. Even with the superlight 3D print could handle heavy bands and that was an awesome feeling. I was blessed. I thought...  But casting process was in front of me.

Seljan - The Slant - First Print

What you see is the first 3D print in PA 2200 (Nylon). Hollow, with inside ribs to keep it strong and preserve flexibility. By default its fully green, white parts show marks of sanding. Nylon is not really a friend of sanding or abrasive processes. Wet sanding helps but it's a never ending story. By the way, 3D printed nylon is a porous on the surface, so if someone start wet sanding right first it my suck in the water and sometimes it feels weird. So I like wet sanding only close to the final grits. The initial sanding phase was up to 600 grit. Seven layers of acrylic coating and some layers were sanded in-between too. Acrylic coat was curing for 4 days. Then wet sanding up to 1000 grit and some Dremel brushing and polishing at the tiny parts. Was more than a week to check every nasty corners.

Seljan - The Slant - Casting Preparation

This is the divider and the frame after the first casts. I was thinking of making a laser cut, mill, 3D print divider, but it was cheaper and faster to find a local workshop that's dedicated for the work. Honestly it is not necessary after all.... I thought the divider helps the handmade casting that much, but not in all case. Of course in my case (for this specific slingshot) it was useless and just slowed down the work with weeks. Anyway It was just the first part of the casting disaster.


Seljan - The Slant - Casting Preparation

What you see is the closeup of the acrylic coated 3D printed frame. If you see those little flags around the aim-reference dots you may already say. It was too sticky for the sand. Yes, it was. I will present the wasteland of failures next time. The greyish-shiny coat is graphite and talc. The first sand was so rough I had to retouch or better call it: redo the coat and polish after this first run.

Seljan - The Slant - Casting Preparation

The area you see in the middle is the center of mass. This is the "heart" of both geometry (volume and weight) and pouring in of the melted metal. I had no luck with the rough sand and the divider, but I was careful enough with this and the cross sections were chosen wisely (and luckily). This makes possible that the back of the handle can be made and the liquid aluminum can reach that tiny lanyard part at the tip of this frame.

Seljan - The Slant - Casting Preparation

More details about the suffered casting master. I had a real fight with the guy who made the sand casting for the first tests. There was lot of lying and cheating in the background. I was prepared but was absolutely surprised on the other side. Probably I will repeat myself, but mention here. I've spent six months to finally find the master craftsman who actually knows how to cast. More details a bit later.

Seljan - The Slant - Stepping Issue

This last picture is a small reminder of failing in 3D print. Both of them Slant slingshot prints. Technical details like resolution, exit hole sizes are the same. Do you see the homogeneous, grainy red surface ?and that stepped low quality in green? It is a mistake of the orientation! Laser printing is expensive, so no one average craftsmen have money to own one. Laser printing is made by companies. And they like to save money when they can. Printing is slow. It is going layer by layer. If you have a higher (a 140mm or max 6" slingshot is HIGH to them) standing model that means they have to print more layers than in a laying flat mode. So they laying down your model to print it faster - and cheaper to them... It' not true for EVERYTHING, but for the Slant it was true and it was a huge problem. I was waiting for that green model at least two weeks. It arrived, and it was completely useless for casting... wasted time, wasted money and disappointment. I had to email and make a correction with the printing company. They were helpful and friendly, I lost no money, but when you have no time to sleep enough you don't want loose time and enthusiasm.

Lessons learned

  • Casting needs lot of preparation and effort. After the first tests you may want to check everything again.Iteration is king.
  • Do not waste time to stay and stick to a manufacturer or craftsman if you're not satisfied. Stay in love or leave in a blink.
  • No matter what advanced technology are you using or paying for. There is someone who will push a button. And make it wrong. Don't be mad about that. It will happen. Be prepared and ask them before they start something. Email them, phone them. Ask for work in progress photos or anything. If you loose something that's mostly your valuable time. Even a start button can be pushed wrongly.
  • Test your slingshot (or any product) and enjoy! If you do not enjoy and believe in your slingshot from the first time.. the whole production will turn into a nightmare of disappointments. Have fun or there will be fun...

003 - Enter Sandman

Expectations? - hold your horses

After the divider and the master cast was ready (roughly 4 weeks + printing time that's usually 3 weeks) I was uplifted, happy and relaxed. I had aluminum casting projects before and had great results. So I thought I will ring my contacts and everything will be fine.

No way. The man I was working with, cheated a bit to make his life easier. He agreed with a different "master" than I thought.

Results

  • Out of 10 castings only 2 was acceptable
  • I was waiting 3 weeks until I see this disaster
  • They cast aluminum like IRON... Huge grains, and a distorted master cast came back had to retouch, refine everything again
  • I had to call the guy 7 times until he gave me back my own 3D print and divider and yeah, more 2 weeks...

Status

After all these "challenges" I was tired but was never happier! Despite the not so funny part, I had the first aluminum version of the Slant and it was way better than everything! The weight was excellent for my taste. Light but not super light for an alu cast.

Seljan - The Slant - Cast Test

From the ten initial cast it was the best in quality... it was not bad if I only wanted to make 1 one piece, but I wanted to make more for the family and for a couple trades. I slowly started sanding, but it was quite hopeless.

Seljan - The Slant - Cast Test

Here is a useless cast. The casting sand was so rough it was almost totally "erase" the centering cone for the thread of the clip. You see a mark of a Dremel tip. I was experimenting a bit but had to move on.

Seljan - The Slant - Cast Test

Next ruined piece. Wonders of angle grinder and inexperienced hand. Not mine, it was made by "a master craftsman".

Seljan - The Slant - Cast Test

It was promising to see that the end of the handle can be made with casting. However the dividing edges were jaggy.

Seljan - The Slant - Cast Test

What you see at the lower center of the image is truly my mistake. I kept in mind aluminum casting during the modeling, but forgot this center area. I missed to create the draft angle. It had straight sidewalls and the casting sand was stuck inside the small windows all the time.

Seljan - The Slant - Cast Test

Decisions need to be made

 At this point I was in trouble. Start this again, try to find someone else who helps me with casting or just make a new print and share that here. I was satisfied with the functionality of the Slant slingshot and that was a great thing.

 Lessons learned

  • It's better to know and avoid a mistake than handle it unprepared.
  • A good concept still needs a proper way to be realized.
  • One day in production equals a week in real life.

004 - Reprint & Additional Parts

Strategy? - Waiting

I made the changes on the frame as soon as possible and was waiting for the new print . Then made sanding, coating, polishing. (3 weeks more)

Belt Clip & Field Key

In the spare time I started working on the details of the belt clip and an additional key that was inspired by master Flicks. I used a new material for this. Liked the look but not the function. So take a look at the pictures.
Seljan - The Slant - Belt Clip

What you see on the picture is the first printed (v2) belt clip for the Slant. The bottom was almost at the final stage but the top was quite flat.  I had no big problems with the shape but it was bending instead of flexing. So when in use the flat lever become a curved one and that was looking weird.

Seljan - The Slant - Belt Clip

Can you see those shiny particles at the clip? That's aluminum. This part was printed in an aluminum-polyamide (nylon) mixture called alumide. It can be polished a bit and the shiny alu grain looks quite nice. The only problem is: alumide is flexible and soft. Actually it's too soft. Pure nylon print is almost two times stronger than half alu half nylon. OK, at least I tried something new.

Seljan - The Slant - Belt Clip

Here is a sneak peak of the Slant v1 alu at the bottom. It is mounted with the final belt clip. The risen shape modified the bending of the material. It is also working well with thicker textiles (denim pocket) and don't disturbs the hand when shooting.

Seljan - The Slant - Field Key

So this is my take on the field key. Before someone ask for it: it's too expensive to print it in metal. But I will tell the details. This type of Allen key is using this tiny wing like shape that can be pinched between thumb and index. Inside the wing a cavity is placed to accept a paracord lanyard. A key like this can be mounted on your lanyard and you can keep it in front all the time.

Seljan - The Slant - Field Key

like these till this day, but they need to be printed in metal, or have to create a bit holder, because the material is not strong enough. I don't think anyone like a key that cost of a price of a budget slingshot. So I'm using traditional keys until I can find a good balance in price and function.

Lessons learned

  • Trust to proof. New materials can be nice, but needs the extra attention.
  • Nowadays everything can be created and produced, but making something bulletproof or space tech makes no sense if you can not improve function (at least for me).

005 - Here we go - The Slant 1.0

Casting for real

It took me almost six months to find the best aluminum caster in my country but I've found him. 

Anodizing - no way

After the PlastiDip failure I had the newly made casts and wanted to anodize them. Asked a couple experts and I was told - It can be done, but be prepared! All in all anodizing an aluminum cast really depends on the components of the casting material, the mechanical treatment of the surface including what material is used for the treatment and how. Also the usual lye bath before anodizing can help to open up the surface. Long story short. Had a success in anodizing.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.0

The fork is at 4" and tips are 30mils. What you see is 1" bands. It has a very low fork and a super short neck transition. Really close to the wrist and the handle is large enough to keep the grip safe and under control. The center of mass is right at the middle finger - just at the top of the neck. So if shoot with a light grip it still behaves pretty well.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.0

Here is the tapered body from the side. This taper really helps to spare a couple grams and maintain the low profile of the slingshot. The frame is angled in all directions. Looks easy, but shape is tricky. The clips are thin and in line with the braces. So it's easy to grip them to keep the lever low.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.0

Some of you might remember my PenPouch. It's version 3 and hope this year I can make a new innovative version again. Anyway the most important thing is the "one in the chamber" function for hunters or slingshot IPSC my dream sport... The idea comes from Vinnie and updated with the clip function. For hunters: if you place your finger behind the clip - through the skeletonized handle you can avoid the clip to make noise when pouch is released.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.0

It is a full sized frame but not overly large. I used microcord for the cobra stitch lanyard instead of the usual 550 paracord. 550 was simply too bulky and not as comfy to me as this. The bigger knots on an 550 stitch were not as homogeneous as on this thinner counterpart. It also has a stiffness that makes easier to mount on your wrist. Pocket-ability was also a huge issue, so I decided to go with this instead of the standard 550.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.0

No shine - no slip. I don't really care about tactical look or coolness. In fact my hands are sweating and slipping quite easily. Not my best "skill" but what to do. I like this textured, blasted surface. Most of my friends described it as "metal concrete" or " frozen velvet". On Slant 1.0 clips and band clips are 3D printed nylon parts.

 

Seljan - The Slant - 1.0

This is the way to clip at light walks or collecting ammo. No mess and still a room for the other slingshot(s) in the pocket.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.0

Thanks to the microcord lanyard it can occupy a smaller space in the pocket.


006 - Crash Test Baby

Feedback time

So thanks God, I was over a long work and Slant was ready to go. Used a lot, and was satisfied. But it was only me. The big test was still miles away. At this moment trades came into my mind. I had a couple trades with the Slant v1.0. I was honored by my trade partners and received not just super awesome slingshots, but valuable feedback. Thank you my friends, you helped me a lot at these "early" stages. What's coming after this will be new to you too and heavily based on your input and suggestion.

Seljan - The Slant - Tests

All of us liked the surface and it was a good start. The rough, blasted and anodized aluminum was great. I was spending a lot of time to think of the order of cutting the threads. Some people say it's better to cut after anodizing some say cut it before. All in all. I'm not disappointed and will keep cutting threads before anodizing. Thanks to this the thread will be even more durable.

Seljan - The Slant - Tests

This closeup really shows the strength of the blasting. It was a bit stronger than needed. Metal-oxide blasting made a great job for prepare anodizing, but erased lot of details. It was not a big deal, but when you spend hours to make a decision between 0,25 and 0,5 mm as a radii you don't want to loose that detail. So it I had a conclusion to make a less pronounced surface finish.

Seljan - The Slant - Tests

I had no luck with Plasti Dip, you already know that. Anyway I tried and checked if it works better with 3D printed parts than aluminum. It was better, definitely, but durable? Not at all. However it was perfect as an indicator material for wearing.

Seljan - The Slant - Tests

OK, have you ever asked why is that mini beaver tail at the most left part of the clip? That tiny extent theoretically used to be a position knob for the center mounted lanyard, but in practice it was useless because it works better with off-center lanyard. I thought it needs to be removed, but during shooting and wearing I really liked it. It gives a great tactile feedback and when I was sitting on a meeting (sometimes I also have too) it was a good feeling to rest my thumb on this part. Slinger feeling. That will be kept in place.

Seljan - The Slant - Tests

Here is a comparison with the first standard (the piece I used) cobra stitch and the microcord version. I do like lanyards but mostly for safety on a carried slingshot it might be better if easy to mount but do not eats up too much space. Microcord gives enough stiffness to handle well.

Seljan - The Slant - Tests

With my beloved band with. It was used for many months with various distances, shooting styles, and long long hours.

Lessons learned

  • When you already have something that is working it's not so easy to go forward with improving.
  • Even if something is good there is always a feeling to make it even better, but who knows how.

007 - Tell me the truth

Doubt

Nathan suggested to improve pinch grip. Flicks had comments about the handle and I was standing barefoot somewhere in the crowd. They told me it will be great, but you know... to make it perfect... So it was time to version 1.1.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1
Version 1.1 is based on changes to improve ergonomics. The overall thickness of the slingshot is increased with 2 millimeters the with of the handle from front view is also wider in shape. The thumb support and finger hook area was changed to a curve instead of a straight line (better for pinch).

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1

One size fits all. I really learned a thing in ergonomics. You need flexibility but if things are over-complicated it's mostly just getting worse.  If you can scale something and it works as expected that is a good sine of functionality in ergonomics. Many of the slingshots are proven this concept. You can find tons of good scale-able outlines in the template sections here. So I tried it.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1

I was not talking too much about the clips, because it was less difficult and as I developed the frame I had to change many things automatically.  First I had the idea of printing them. But slowly it became a possibility to make a handmade cast for these clips too. This was an unexpected challenge but by increasing thickness and reducing insets it was possible to target.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1

The bottom frame is 1.1 there is not much change if you just judge by eye quickly, but in geometry it gave the room for a larger radius along the side. This higher radii increased the comfort and the plus thickness made the frame a bit heavier. Not much only 20 grams.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1

Quick test before waiting 2 weeks for a print.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1

While waiting 1.1 to be printed I've spent some time with the belt clip. Flicks noticed: it is a gentle, but useful palm swell. I was wondering what happens if it is a bit inflated and functions as a palm swell & as a belt clip. It was fine definitely. I've wrapped this distorted pyramid like shape to the frame and used for a week at least. It was good, but not as good as big in volume. It may be good idea for standard materials but not for 3D printing at the moment.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1

A different angle of view.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.1

This was Slant version 1.1. Slightly larger width at the handle, increased thickness and a better grip for pinching.

My only problem with1.1 was...

It was not a fast shooter as it was previously. The changes I made on the head were a bit off. thickness and radius changes worked great but outline changes were less efficient for the preferred shooting style.

Conclusion

All suggested changes were great, but I needed 3 months to overcome these issues and doubts. My conclusion was to make a bit more rounded frame at the finger area and make a wider handle too.

Lessons learned

  • Sometimes it's all about feelings. Performance might be the same or better, but good feelings gives the desired comfort.
  • It's worth to listen to an advice. Even if it's not manageable it can open up new possibilities.
  • "It's ready" is not equal with "It's done"

008 - On the right track

Workshop time

CAD of Slant 1.2 was finished and alu casts were made afterwards. The superb handmade casting was sweet to sanding. I wanted to keep the manual workflow, so no powertools for sanding, just good old files and sanding papers. The pictures are showing these moments.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

CAD draft of Slant 1.2

Differences between 1.0 and 1.2

  • Handle width is increased
  • 1mm plus overall thickness
  • higher radius at finger support areas
  • longer thread for the clip
  • higher draft angles to make casting process easier
  • thicker band clips
  • stronger sockets inside clips
Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

A mobile shot of the actual mold. Band clips are also handmade aluminum casts.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Alu was poured from 3 different feeding points. From the tips and at the handle. the final casts were super detailed with this smooth casting sand.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Do you remember the first photos of the casts? Now it looks awesome even from start of manual sanding.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2
Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Checking forktips.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Make sure there is no any sharp split edge before going forward.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Voila, this is the smallest handmade aluminum cast I've ever seen. Started as a challenge for both CAD and casting and it was truly enjoyed. Of course it needs some time with corrections and sanding, but that's just fun.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

First bunch of corrected clips. Slingshot sweets.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

I'm getting closer.


009 - Match

Make it fit

Since the clips were not printed anymore a new challenge appeared. Handmade aluminum clips are not that uniform as prints, so they needed some special attention. First it was time to make pairs of them. As a second step there was the matching with the fork.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Check how the outline fits. Shrinking and file work helped to make the good fit.

It was important to make sure the grooves are clean.

The first clip I was made was in flat at the top. It was in line with the fork tip. Just like a normal Top Slot. When I was using the Slant with band-aiming method it was a bit disturbing to see the (target side) top of the clips during aiming at 15-20 meters.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

The casting was so detailed, even some of the original printing marks (actually microns) were visible.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Where files are too rough and sandpaper is too soft, I like to carve aluminum with knives. A tip of a hawkbill can do wonders at such small areas.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Finishing with the pairing.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

I was placing a couple marks to keep a reference point.


010 - Drill & Thread

Challenges

  • Clips were tiny and some trickery needed to make a solid grip while drilling.
  • Designed a special tool to make the frame easier to drill
  • Punching numbers instead of using laser engraving
Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Before started drilling I've tested every matching again, including their outlines with TBG.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Three drill steps were used to make smaller steps and reduce tightening torque. The bottom plate is a piece of thick black rubber. The crown of the clip was aligned flat (during the previous step) and it was a great help to keep the piece steady on the rubber mat during making the drill. Wanted to avoid making harm to the clips with a tightened vise.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Just a close image.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

This is the laser printed tool that was designed to make drilling of the frame faster and easier. It's just as large as necessary. Easy to clean and can be hanged on the wall when not in use.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Slant Plate in action.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Cutting threads.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Testing threads & clips. Make the pairs fit.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Couple of my friends (not from slingshot world) suggested to go with a laser etched number and logo. I see some advantages of these, and like them, but this time I really wanted to punch these with hands. After days of sanding, drilling and everything done by hand it seemed to be a funny thing to etch numbers with laser. So used the traditional way and it feels good I did that for now.


011 - Assembly

Dark coat

Anodizing was done by a local family company. I had a couple addresses, but I was asking my friends who I can trust about anodizing. Called many. Most of them told - Oh, not a problem! - or the opposite - Anodizing a cast is not working, sorry. One man who runs a second generation family business was told - I have to see the cast with my eye, can we make a test? Long story short. I'm really satisfied with the anodizing results. It is not as super fine as for 6061 or 7005 alu, but very-very nice in knowing that it is a handmade cast from a sand mold.

Fall into place

All the parts were finished, threads, drills done. The exiting moment of making the final assembly.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Matching pairs in their dark coat.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

More slingshot sweets.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

I could not resist to make a picture over a carbon sheet. I know it's so predictable, but CF is as nice as nasty to work with.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Cut thread into band clip.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Some of you already commented on the green clip. I also like it, but decided to go with black for now. I also have an explanation on this. Green is used with a tumbled 3D print. It is not that grainy and less porous. The dye stick well, but color may vary time to time. Sometimes it's a light - more grass like - green, sometimes it is closer to the hazard-poison green. Made red, green, black, alu-like colors, tried acrylic coating also and finally decided to use plain black belt clips. It gives the deepest color, with no sensitivity against dirt. It's also less visible when used in the pocket.


Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

First series of the Slant used M5 standard cylindrical - Allen heads. Still use this type at the belt clip mount, but tried smaller headed stainless steel bolts. These are sinking into the clip almost entirely. Working nice and not even noticeable in the pocket.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

Checking before mounting belt clip.

Seljan - The Slant - 1.2

This is the look of the grainy 3D print with the deep charcoal colored  Slant frame.


012 - Presentation and care

Out of the box

I was working with some industrial goods during my years. When was in maintenance it was always exciting to receive a large shipment. When something huge wrapped up wooden package is placed in the middle of the workshop and it's so complete you want to spend some time to see how this package was thought out to keep those heavy chunks in place during shipment. I'm really a fan of functional packaging.

Laser & plywood

Currently I'm not using this technology for my slingshots, but just as water-jet & milling its available and affordable. When package design was started I was checking some paper and metal box manufacturers but most of them were below my expectations or above my budget. Also have to mention I don't need a hundred boxes in my bedroom. Plywood was a good pick.

In practice

The Slant box is designed in CAD. It was important to test it virtually before cutting out. Even with this possibility it was about two months to getting close to the final package. The material is 3mm Birch plywood from Russia.

Hidden challenges

  • Make sure it fits in standard boxes available for shipping
  • Keep weight at the minimum - was calculated in CAD from the start
  • Try to make a package that's worth to keep and not thrown away
  • Make less junk and scrap - use wood as wisely as possible
Seljan - The Slant - Package

The explosion draft of the basic box design. Sliding cap with bayonet fins. Panels are attached and glued.

Seljan - The Slant - Package
Layout of the box. I was using stress relieve "drilling" at some critical areas like fins. It is not a symmetrical design if you take a look at the side panels. It was hard on me to stick myself to the final dimensions but after a while I had to.
Seljan - The Slant - Package

When the first proto was ready I've spent some time to get the feeling. This industrial look and feeling was my goal.

Seljan - The Slant - Package

Of course a package also needs testing. My good, old, tortured Slant was a crash test dummy again. Bands, Allen key, lanyard, everything in place. Some of you eagle eyes might see right away that the cutout inside the package is larger than the handle of the Slant. Yes. The test slingshot is a Slant 1.0 and the box was made for the Slant 1.2. It's just a funny thing to see I was that crazy to start the whole process from the beginning to made such changes like this. 2 millimeters on each side. I made a huge mistake with this box. Guess what! Those extra fins at the rubber loops! I was over-complicating things. It happens. It was just painfully slow to hang the loops around those fins. So tiny, with high friction. I was thinking of using a special hooking tool that's designed for mounting springs into mechanics. I was in constant laughter. So this feature already removed.

Seljan - The Slant - Package

It's not a usual concept for a slingshot or similar goods, but I think it's close to craftsmanship and our relation with wood and plywood in general.


013 - End of heartache

Time still offers

That first package was sitting on my desk for days and then weeks. Was cool to have something in my hands but still missed a tiny thing. I always have a slingshot at my desk. Now I had a couple prototype boxes and slingshots. It was just a small step to combine having slingshots and boxes in front. When the idea was noticed I was instantly electrified. Make the presentation box as a "dock" of the slingshot too.

Seljan - The Slant - Package

 Wasting material is a luxury.  Especially if a cutout can be modified further and turned into a template. And, loops are mountain bike inner tubes cut ups.

Seljan - The Slant - Package

Dock idea in preparation.

Seljan - The Slant - Package

Quick cut.

Seljan - The Slant - Package

Now it's complete. This way it's easy to show the slingshot and picking it up anytime when it's time to deliver some shots.

Seljan - The Slant - Package

014 - The Slant 1.2

  • Handmade, sand cast aluminum frame and band clips
  • Anodized matte surface
  • M5 stainless bolts & over D2 anodized threads inside tips
  • Laser printed PA6 (nylon) belt slips
  • 4" width 30 mm tips for powerful or thin & wide flats
  • Banded up total weight including clips, bolts, lanyard: 225g (~8oz)

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