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Yale Articles by Michael R Basso

 

 

Michael Basso, Jr.

Preparing Successful Future Physicians to Meet Emerging Social Needs in Humanitarian Ways

11/23/2004


Michael Basso, Jr.

The Neurobiology of the Soul

12/03/2004


Michael Basso, Jr.

The University of the Future- Based upon Holism and Humanitarian Constructs

1/09/2005


Michael Basso, Jr.

Bio-psycho-social-tecnho-spiritual Considerations Regarding the 'Human Stress-strain System' in Chronic Disease Processes

2/06/2005


Michael Basso, Jr.

The Philosophy of Philosophy with a View on Health

 

Michael Basso

Frankie Scarfone

7/11/2011

 

Michael Basso, Jr.

The Philosophy of Philosophy with a View on Health

3/14/2005

 

  

Neurobiology of Aging 27 (2006) 1416–1424

Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 is associated with atrophy of the

amygdala in Alzheimer’s disease

Michael Basso a, Joel Gelernter b, John Yang a, Martha G. MacAvoy a,

Pradeep Varma d, Richard A. Bronen d, Christopher H. van Dycka,c,

a Alzheimer’s Disease Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine,

One Church Street, Suite 600, New Haven, CT 06510, USA

b Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

c Department of Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

d Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Received 22 April 2005; received in revised form 30 June 2005; accepted 10 August 2005

Available online 22 September 2005

Abstract

 

Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging 146 (2006) 251261

Volumetry of amygdala and hippocampus and memory

performance in Alzheimer's disease

Michael Bassoa, John Yanga, Lauren Warrena, Martha G. MacAvoya,

Pradeep Varmac, Richard A. Bronenc, Christopher H. van Dycka,b,

aAlzheimer's Disease Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA

bDepartment of Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

cDepartment of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Received 30 July 2005; received in revised form 3 January 2006; accepted 8 January 2006

 

 1. Int J Neurosci. 2001;110(3-4):147-57.

 

Neurobiological relationships between ambient lighting and the startle response

to acoustic stress in humans.

 

Basso MR Jr.

 

A study was conducted to determine differences between psychophysiological

responses to acoustic stress under different ambient lighting conditions. Typical

cool-white indoor lighting was compared to full-spectrum lighting under dim and

bright illumination levels. Full-spectrum lighting exhibits spectral

characteristics that approximate those found in natural sunlight. The startle

response was measured during three preliminary experiments using normal subjects.

In the first experiment, one subject was evaluated. Electromyography (EMG) was

used to measure eyeblink startle at the obicularis oculi muscle; heart rate (HR)

was measured at the wrist; and galvanic skin conductance (GSC) was measured at

the left index finger. There was a significant increase in galvanic skin

conductance (GSC) and a decrease in heart rate. In the second experiment, GSC was

used to measure the startle response under cool-white fluorescent lighting versus

full-spectrum fluorescent lighting (n = 5 subjects) under both bright and dim

lighting conditions. Higher arousal was detected measuring GSC under the

cool-white lighting condition, and under the dim lighting condition using both

types of lighting. In the third experiment, ten subjects were assessed for GSC

startle response using both lighting types set at the dim brightness level. There

was a strong trend indicating a higher GSC arousal under the dim cool-white

lighting condition. Other studies support that a GABAergic inhibitory circuit is

inhibited by darkness and that the spectral characteristics of cool-white

lighting are more stressful to humans than full-spectrum lighting. These

preliminary findings regarding stress and ambient lighting may be especially

important in the neural development of children, and in those clinical

populations that are particularly sensitive to environmental stress.

 

PMID: 11912865 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]