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Nutrition

Ethnobotany Segue to Nutrition

for segue forms (.pdf) see attachment section below

Objectives

  • Demonstrate some of the basic aspects of nutrition science particularly as they relate to studies of food in traditional societies.
  • Illustrate broad applications of nutrition science
  • Develop avenues for students to continue to learn about nutrition science that lead directly out of the segue experience.

Learning Structure

  • Class-room/Laboratory discussion groups (students will have already watched assigned video presentations)
    • Students will discuss concepts of human interactions with plants as they are used for calories and nutrition across a range of cultures.
    • Students will complete a short 30 minute laboratory experiment involving analysis of six varieties of rice. The purpose of the experiment is multi-faceted: 1) the students learn about the importance of intra-species diversity as varieties, 2) the students learn about rudimentary statistical methods without needing a background in mathematics or needing to use a formula, and 3) the students learn to observe and analyze variation in plant foods that they see around them.
    • Students will complete a short 15 minute laboratory experiment involving sensory analysis of ten species of limu (edible algae). The purpose of this experiment is to illustrate (in parallel with the above rice experiment) that wild-harvested food diversity is usually harvested at the species rather than the variety level even though linguistically it is discussed as very much the same sort of variation. The students learn about the importance of inter-species diversity across a broadly defined cultural category.
  • Community observations
    • Following the above in-class work, students will be asked to choose one nutrient from a nutrition facts label.  They will be asked to identify one food source high in that nutrient, one food source low in that nutrient, and one physiological purpose for that nutrient.
  • Web-based delivery of information to students:

    • Provide a brief overview of some of the most interesting areas of nutrition science.
    • Direct students to practitioners of nutrition science within the University and in the community at-large.
    • Show students specific courses or other educational opportunities that can be used to further explore interests in nutrition science.

Learning Outcomes

    (1 = Most Desired Outcome, 3 = A Desirable Outcome, 5 = Least Desired Outcome)

  • Students seek more information about studies in nutrition science, register to take a course in nutrition science, and become a degree seeking major in food and nutrition science.
  1. Students seek more information about studies in nutrition science and register to take a course in nutrition science as part of an effort to broaden their education.
  2. Students develop a sufficient (but minimal) understanding of nutrition science to be able to make decisions about their own career (and inclusion or not of this science). These students are probably better citizens/voters.
  3. Students do not learn anything about nutrition science.
  4. Students develop a negative perspective about nutrition science because of the information received through this project.

Ethnobotany Segue

  • Two ethnobotany experiments are conducted together bridging this segue with a segue to Marine Biology.
  • During the class session, the students will conduct a two-part experiment examining diversity of six varieties of rice. The varieties of rice have been selected to represent a broad range from really cheap "junk" rice to top quality fresh rice from Japan. A blind taste, smell, etc. analysis will be conducted by the students. This will be accompanied by a statistical analysis comparing varieties to see if they are physically "different."
  • The conclusion of the rice test will be a group composite result with discussion of the result and the variation with individual results and perspectives.
  • As a follow-up to the lab, students will be asked to pick a nutrient presented on a nutrient facts label and research the following information: one food source high in that nutrient, one food source low in that nutrient, and one physiological purpose for that nutrient.  Their findings will be discussed next week in class.

Other Science 

  • Nutrition is a science that studies the relationship between diet and health. Dietitians are health professionals who specialize in this area of study, and are trained to provide safe, evidence-based dietary advice and interventions. In the U.S., Dietitians are registered with the American Dietetic Association and are only able to use the label "Dietitian" when they have met strict, specific educational and experiential prerequisites and passed a national registration examination. Anyone may call themselves a Nutritionist,[1]including unqualified personnel, as this term is unregulated.

    Deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diet can produce negative impacts on health, which may lead to diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, scurvy, obesity or osteoporosis, as well as psychological and behavioral problems. Moreover, excessive ingestion of elements that have no apparent role in health, (e.g. lead, mercury, PCBs, dioxins), may incur toxic and potentially lethal effects, depending on the dose.

    Many common diseases and their symptoms can often be prevented or alleviated with better nutrition. The science of nutrition attempts to understand how and why specific dietary aspects influence health.

Other Science Practitioners

  • If you are interested in learning more about  nutrition science may want to contact Dr. Dian Dooley, dian@hawaii.edu, Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, AGSCI rm. 314H, (808) 956-7021.
  • Dr. Wayne Iwaoka, Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, is also available to speak with students about nutrition science. He can be contacted at iwaoka@hawaii.edu, AGSCI rm. 302A, (808) 956-6456.

Other Science Courses

  • Students interested in learning more about nutrition science may want to take FSHN 185: The Science of Human Nutrition.

Resources



Funded by National Science Foundation Grant Award Number DUE06-18690

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Dave Reedy,
Dec 16, 2008, 2:02 PM
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Dave Reedy,
Dec 16, 2008, 2:01 PM
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Dave Reedy,
Aug 8, 2008, 9:18 PM
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Dave Reedy,
Aug 8, 2008, 9:18 PM
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