Syllabus 626 (619) CSCS

August  
31

September   7    14   21    28    30

October   5    12     19    26

November    2    9    16*    23    30  

December        14   

eProfessor: Norman Herr, Ph.D.
email: norm.herr@csun.edu
phone: 818 677-2505
offices:  ED 2138;  W.M. Keck Science Ed Lab ED2105
office hours:  Tuesdays, 1-4 (please email first)

Time: Tuesdays, 4:00-8:00 PM

Methods of Evaluation - Performance is evaluated on the quality of contributions to CSCS activities (20%), as well as on the quality of student-developed CSCS investigations and websites (80%).

Contribution to CSCS Investigations (20%)
    • Contribution to all in-class CSCS activities  investigations - During class sessions, we will be engaged in a variety of CSCS Investigations dealing with concepts and principles in the sciences.  Students are expected to participate in all these activities to experience their effectiveness from a student's perspective.
Development of  new CSCS Investigations and websites (80%)
    • Masters Program Website  - Continue developing your masters program website which includes all work performed in all courses in your masters degree program.
    • CSCS Investigations Website - Develop a CSCS (Computer Supported Collaborative Science) website which includes all of the CSCS activities performed in class, as well as personally developed CSCS activities that involve collaborative data analysis, collaborative resource development and continuous formative assessment. 
    • Classroom Website - Develop a website to be used in the teaching a scientific discipline  Your website should include all of the interactive features discussed in the class.  It must include a minimum of 80 pages, including a variety of resources s, including, but not limited to, the following: Interactive State Content Standards;  links to useful resources, syllabi, semester plans, assignments, letter to parents, calendars, FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions), Department & school contact lists, Curricular material, class handouts, sample projects (student reports, artwork, lab reports, projects, posters), homework assignments, problem solutions, links to relevant resources, web quests, glossary (key words, root words, etc.), study guides, help, department standards, interactive resources, wiki, blogs, academic- social networks, questionnaires & surveys (for formative assessment, gathering student data, etc,), multimedia teaching resources, animations, movies (procedures, activities, interviews, etc), diagrams, graphic organizers & concept maps, photos for use in class instruction (photos related to the subject you teach), Interactive documents, interactive maps.  Your website should include analytics that allow you track usage.
    • Editorial Work - Participation Provide continuous feedback regarding the status and quality of the websites developed by your editor.Respond to all editorial comments made by your editor on your work.
93% A , 90% A- , 87% B+ , 83% B , 80% B- , 77% C+ , 73% C , 70% C- , 67% D+ , 63% D , 60% D- , below 60% F 


Revised Course Description  - This course provides educators opportunities to develop interactive websites and dynamic online activities to engage their students in the those practices and habits of mind described, such as asking questions and defining problems, developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematics and computational thinking, constructing explanations and designing solutions, engaging in argument from evidence, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. This course fosters the development of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) so that educators are prepared to use the web-based resources they develop to engage students and enhance learning.

Course Outline
  • Website Development for Teaching Science
    • Educational Website Design - Principles & Research
    • Website Development - Basics
    • Website Development - Advanced Features
  • Developing online techniques to Build Student Science & Engineering Practices
    • Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
    • Developing and using models
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Analyzing and interpreting data
    • Using mathematics and computational thinking
    • Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering)
    • Engaging in argument from evidence
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
  • Collaborative Data Analysis
    • Research on pooled data analysis in science classrooms
    • Collaborative Spreadsheets
    • Collaborative Graphing
    • Collaborative Mapping
  • Collaborative Resource Development
    • Research on collaborative resource development in science classrooms
    • Collaborative Docs
    • Collaborative Drawings
    • Collaborative Presentations
  • Continuous Formative Assessment
    • Research on formative assessment
    • Monitoring Student Performance in Real-Time
    • Adjusting Instruction to Optimize Learning

Texts

NGSS Lead States. (2013). Next Generation Science Standards: For states, by states. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Herr, N. (2008). The Sourcebook for Teaching Science – Strategies, Activities, and Instructional Resources.San Francisco. John Wiley. 584 pages. 

Herr, N.; Tippens, M.; Rivas, M.; Vandergon, V., d'Alessio, M., & Reveles, J. (2015). Continuous Formative Assessment (CFA) - A cloud-based pedagogy for evaluating student understanding to optimize STEM teaching and learning. In Chao, L., Cloud-Based STEM Education for Improved Learning Outcomes to be published by IGI Global, Hershey, PA: IGI-Global Publishing.

Vandergon, V., Herr, N.; Tippens, M.; Rivas, M.; d'Alessio, M., & Reveles, J. (2015). Collaborative data analysis. In Chao, L., Cloud-Based STEM Education for Improved Learning Outcomes to be published by IGI Global, Hershey, PA: IGI-Global Publishing.

Herr, N., Rivas, M., Chang, T., Tippens, M., Vandergon, V., d'Alessio, M., & Nguyen-Graff, D. (2015) .Continuous formative assessment (CFA) during blended and online instruction using cloud-based collaborative documents. In Koç, S., Wachira, P., & Liu, X. (Eds.), Assessment in Online and Blended Learning Environments. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

d'Alessio, M., Herr, N., Vandergon, V. (2016)  Draft Science Framework Chapters

The Instructional Quality Commission approved the Draft Science Framework for California Public Schools for field review on June 20, 2016.

Selected Bibliography

Herr, N. & Cunningham, J. (1999). Hands-On Chemistry Activities with Real-Life Applications. West Nyack, New York, Jossey-Bass (Prentice-Hall). 638 pages. 

Cunningham, J. & Herr, N. (1994).  Hands-On Physics Activities with Real-Life Applications. West Nyack, New York, Jossey-Bass (Simon & Schuster), 670 pages.

Herr, N. (2013). Everyone in the Pool! Collaborative Data Analysis in the Science Classroom. HP Catalyst Academy. (http://hpca-cscs.com)

Herr, N., & Rivas, M. (2014). Using Cloud-Based Collaborative Resources to Conduct Continuous Formative AssessmentProceedings of the 12th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education. 5-8 January, Honolulu, HI: HICE.

Herr, N., & Rivas, M. (2014). Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering Practices of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) with Computer Supported Collaborative Science (CSCS).Proceedings of the 12th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education5-8 January, Honolulu, HI: HICE.

Foley, B., Reveles, J., Herr, N., Tippens, M., d'Alessio, M., Lundquist, L., Castillo, K.,& Vandergon, V. (2014) . Computer Supported Collaborative Science (CSCS): An Instructional Model for Teaching the NGSS.Proceedings of the 2014 International Meeting of the Association for Science Teacher Education. New York: Springer-ASTE.

Herr, N., Rivas, M. (2014). Computer Supported Collaborative Science (CSCS): Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering Practices of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) with Computer Supported Collaborative Science (CSCS). Proceedings of the 2014 International Meeting of the Association for Science Teacher Education.

Herr, N., & Tippens, M. (2013) . Using scanning apps on smart phones to perform continuous formative assessments of student problem-solving skills during instruction in mathematics and science classes. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.). Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2013 (pp. 1138-1143). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

Herr, N., Rivas, M., Foley, B., d'Alessio, M. & Vandergon, V. (2012) . Using cloud-based collaborative documents to perform continuous formative assessment during instruction. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2012 (pp. 612-615). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

Herr, N., Rivas, M., Foley, B., Vandergon, V., d'Alessio, M., Simila, G., Nguyen-Graff, D. & Postma, H. (2012). Employing collaborative online documents for continuous formative assessments. In P. Resta (Ed.),Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (pp. 3899-3903). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.


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