Parra (Cell Parts)

TitleOrganization of Plant and Animal Cells 

Principle(s) Investigated: Difference between Animal and Plant Cells, Organelle functions, 

Standards : Focus on Life Sciences

Cell Biology

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope. As a basis for understanding this concept:

a. Students know cells function similarly in all living organisms. 

b.     Students know the characteristics that distinguish plant cells from animal cells,

        including chloroplasts and cell walls.

c.    Students know the nucleus is the repository for genetic information in plant and animal cells.

d.     Students know that mitochondria liberate energy for the work that cells do and that chloroplasts 

        capture sunlight energy for         

        photosynthesis.

e.     Students know cells divide to increase their numbers through a process of mitosis, which results in 

        two daughter cells with identical sets of chromosomes.

f. Students know that as multicellular organisms develop, their cells differentiate. 


MaterialsCandy, Handouts, Notebook, index cards, construction/colored paper

http://www.mce.k12tn.net/science2/life_science_5/cells/cells_5thgrade.htm

http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/ATG/data/released/0251-NickHoffman/index.php

Materials for cell models:

 Organelle                                 Candy
 Cell Membrane Ziplock bag 
 Lysosomeskittles
 NucleusDOTS
 VacuoleMarties (animal cell)  2 Mamba (plant cell) 
 MitochondrionMike N Ike
Centrosome M & M's
 CytoplasmJello 
 Rough ERSour gum worms with sugar coating 
 Smooth ERGummy worms smooth 
 RibosomesNerds
 Golgi BodyRed Vines

Use these diagrams to help you shape the organelles

 

Pictures from: http://www.cellsalive.com/cells/cell_model.htm

Procedure:

Candy Cell Model

DO NOT EAT THE CANDY!

Steps for Note cards

1. Cut 5 index cards in ½.
2. Write the name of the cell organelle and the candy used on one side of the index card.
a. Write the function on the other side.
b. Use 1 color of colored pencil for both. Do not use this color again. 
c. Repeat this process for all of the organelles.
3. You will have 9 cards total, each written in a different color. 

Steps to create your model


1. Open ziplock bag

2. Using spoon scoop 1-2 teaspoons of jello in bag

3. Smooth the jello inside to create a soft cytoplasm inside

4. Using the various candies create the organelles try to use the proper shapes

5. On your handout write down the name of the candy that you will use to represent the organelle

6. Once all organelles are in place close the ziplock tightly

7. Keep the candy cell model to study for the test. Quiz your friends. 

Closure

1. The teacher will check to see if your project has been completed.
2. Chose one member of the group to keep the cell as it will be used later in class and as a study aid.


Student prior knowledgeStudents will need to have learned about the Difference between An Animal cell and a Plant cell. They must also be familiar with the organelles. This lab will help them practice what they have learned and will help them study for their final Cell Functions test.  

Parts of a cell PowerPoint:
 


ExplanationGive a thorough explanation of the experiment or demonstration. Your explanation should be written to give your fellow teachers a solid understanding and include greater detail than what you might provide for your secondary students. Make certain to include equations whenever pertinent. 

Lesson Topic: Eukaryotic Animal Cell, Candy Cell Model

Overview: This activity allows the students to build 3D cell models and to have a real life example to help them understand and develop this concept. 

Objective(s): Students will be able to:
1. Describe the cell as a 3D object rather than the 2D object they are accustomed to observing.
2. Describe the appearance and location within the cell of the various cell organelles
3. Compare and Contrast their plant cell and their animal cell
4. Describe the functions of selected cell organelles

Resources/Materials:
Teacher Materials: ziplock bags, spoons, jello, various candies
Student Materials: writing instrument, handout, index cards 

Activity:
1. Students, in groups or individually, will get a ziplock bag. They will label their ziplock with a piece of tape with their name or group names on it. 
2. Students will then scoop two spoonfuls of gellatin into their bag
3. They will then close the bag and smooth out the gellatin making it the cytoplasm of the cell.
4. Using the various candies create the organelles try to match the shapes.
5. On your handout write down the name of the candy that you will use to represent the organelle
6. Once all organelles are in place close the ziplock tightly
7. Keep the candy cell model to study for the test. Quiz your friends. 

Closure
1. The teacher will check to see if your project has been completed.
2. Chose one member of the group to keep the cell as it will be used later in class and as a study aid.

Tying it all together: 
Students can compare and observe other cell models and help each other to ensure that they have created the best cell for their learning. 

Questions & Answers: 
1. What are some differences between a plant cell and an animal cell?

2. Two types of organisms whose cells do NOT have a nucleus are:
a. prokaryotes and eukaryotes
b. plants and animals
c. bacteria and archaea
d. single-celled and multicellular organisms

3. Compare the functions of the endoplasmic reticulum with the functions of the Golgi complex.

4. What would happen if all the ribosomes in your cells disappeared?

Applications to Everyday Life: 

Human Use of Plants and Animals

  • "The knowledge gained through biology has promoted an understanding of how to grow plants, manage soil quality and conserve forests and other flora. Farmers rearing livestock as a result of animal husbandry and growing high-yield and disease resistant crops are further examples of how biology is used in everyday life. From knowledge gained through biological sciences the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries derive compounds from plants to use in their products. People wanting to grow thriving, pest- and disease-free plants in their gardens are also guided by the discoveries made through biology."

Read more: Everyday Uses of Biology | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8660410_everyday-uses-biology.html#ixzz1ra3sNvah


Photographs: 
Steps of lab: 
  








 



  

 



Examples of other types of cell projects
 
 


Videos: 

YouTube Video-Cell Rap


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Esmeralda Parra,
Apr 10, 2012, 11:18 AM
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Esmeralda Parra,
Apr 10, 2012, 1:27 PM
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Esmeralda Parra,
Apr 10, 2012, 11:19 AM
ĉ
ď
Esmeralda Parra,
Apr 10, 2012, 11:18 AM
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