Science from Scouseland

Welcome to the Scouse Science Alliance homepage! 

Snippets from our most recent posts can be found below. To find older posts, just click on one of the tabs above to see every entry in that section of the site, or click here for the post index.


Around Yous and in the News

This, our newest section, lists upcoming science-based events in our fair city, as well as the most interesting scientific news stories from around the world. Go to the Around Yous & News section for more details.

We'll keep it updated regularly but, if you know of any events or stories you think should be included here, feel free to get in touch!



Coming Soon... 
    Monday 13th of July...
    Friday 17th of July: U in our A-Z...

  Most recent posts

Science in Focus

  • The Brain on Tetris By Isabel Hutchison, originally featured on the Brain Bank blog.    You’re probably all too familiar with Tetris as a procrastination tool – but did you know about its far more reputable role in psychological research?     If you’ve ever played Tetris for a while, you may have noticed its lingering effects– such as daydreaming of objects in the room slotting together. If this sounds vaguely familiar, the diagnosis is (I kid you not): Tetris Syndrome.     That this is indeed a real phenomenon is backed by the fact that it makes a respectably lengthy appearance on Wikipedia. According to said source, it “occurs when people devote sufficient time and attention to an activity that it begins to overshadow their thoughts, mental ...
    Posted Jul 27, 2015, 6:00 AM by Al Liance
  • What is a Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)? By Dulcie Emery    "Numbat" by Martin Pot (Martybugs at en.wikipedia). Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.     The numbat is a small marsupial that’s found in Western Australia. It is an omnivorous animal but its diet primarily is termites, ants and other small insects. They have strong front claws and long tongue to get to the termites they eat.     However numbats cannot destroy a termite nest. Instead it searches for secret entrances to mounds to find their meal! The numbat lives in forests and woodlands, especially those made up mainly of eucalyptus trees and close to water. The numbat is a solitary creature which sleeps in hollow logs and burrows.      They are prey to a large ...
    Posted Jul 6, 2015, 2:10 AM by Al Liance
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 14. View more »

Scientist of the Month

  • Norman Borlaug (1914-2009) – “The Father of the Green Revolution” By Alexandra Royden Norman Borlaug in 1964, scoring wheat plants for rust resistance in wheat breeding plots near Ciudad Obregón, Sonora, northern Mexico. Photo credit: CIMMYT     You may never have heard of Norman Borlaug, but everyone should have. Norman Borlaug was a plant scientist, a humanitarian and a pioneer, who saved more lives in his than anyone else in history. It may seem counter-intuitive that an agricultural scientist born in Cresca, Iowa in 1914 should go on to receive the Nobel Peace Prize – how do plants bring peace, you may ask? The answer is that food and peace are inextricably linked, or in the words of another Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Lord John Boyd Orr, "You can't build ...
    Posted Jun 9, 2015, 6:49 AM by Al Liance
  • Lynn Margulis: Her Inconvenient Truth by Sarah Bell    I remember the first time I heard the name Dr Lynn Margulis. As a fresh faced new undergraduate, sitting in a dusty lecture theatre in a cell biology lecture, scribbling frantically, terrified of missing anything the speaker said.  I remember hearing the story of a feather-ruffling scientist who had devised a theory about the evolution of life on earth as we know it, that at the time was so contentious it was almost heresy to those who worshiped at the metaphorical church of Darwinism.     This scientist’s vision explained some of the trickiest problems in cell biology and evolution and was simple but genius. The only problem was, at first, nobody believed her. Luckily for science ...
    Posted Jun 1, 2015, 7:50 AM by Al Liance
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 7. View more »

A - Z

  • Z is for Zorses & Zonkeys By Nicola BeesleyWell, folks, we started with alpaca and, along the way, picked up some facts about the honey badger, kangaroo rat and even the extinct velociraptor. However, we’ve now reached the end of our animal-themed A to Z run and, whilst there are slim pickings for Z (sorry fans of Sharknado - no zebra sharks here), I couldn’t quite pick between zorses and zonkeys… Both zorses and zonkeys are hybrids of zebras and other equids; the horse and the donkey respectively. The collective name for a zebra hybrid is a ‘zebroid’ and they are usually the result of a zebra stallion mating with a female horse (mare) or donkey (jenny). Zebroids are an example of ‘interspecific ...
    Posted Aug 14, 2015, 6:23 AM by Al Liance
  • Y is for Yakka Skink By Ian Wilson The yakka skink (Egernia rugosa) is a small lizard causing big problems. Last week, it made international news as, along with the ornamental snake, it derailed an £8 billion project in Australia! The Galilee basin in Queensland was due to become the home of a new mine, port and rail project from the Indian company, Adani. However, the Federal Court of Australia found that the Environment Minister, Greg Hunt, had ignored advice that populations of the yakka skink and ornamental snake – both threatened with extinction – would be put at significant risk by the development. Only time will tell whether the project will find its footing again but, for now, the mighty skink and snake have won an ...
    Posted Aug 10, 2015, 1:35 AM by Al Liance
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 25. View more »

Soap box

  • Science and Religion – Awkward Bedfellows Through The Ages By Ian WilsonScience and religion haven’t always seen eye-to-eye over the centuries. The ways in which they impact upon one another have changed hugely, with each civilisation and religion having its own views and rules. Here, I’ll take a look at 3 major moments in history that showcase this ever-changing, and often tumultuous, relationship. The Ancient Egyptians (~3150 BC to ~30 BC) The Egyptians didn’t have what we would call ‘scientific understanding’. Rather than deducing earthly and natural meanings for the phenomena they observed, they attributed everything to their Gods. Yet they learned an incredible amount about the world in their bid to understand their Gods’ wishes and to use natural phenomena in ...
    Posted May 5, 2015, 12:44 AM by Al Liance
  • 4 things scientists can learn from politicans By Ian WilsonOn 7th May 2015 voters across the UK will be heading to the polling stations for the general election. This inevitably means that our television screens and newspapers are full of stories of politicians mingling with constituents, slinging muck at one another and playing games of one-up-manship to win over voters. Sarah, over at the Brain Bank, has looked at what politicians could learn from scientists to improve public perception. Meanwhile, here, I’ve pondered what it is that politicians actually do better than scientists and that researchers could learn from. 1. Public speaking and community engagement David Cameron meeting members of the public. Photo source: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills via Flickr. Licence ...
    Posted Apr 27, 2015, 5:48 AM by Al Liance
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 5. View more »