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Vellum and things that are called Vellum but aren't

Vellum was originally cow and calf skin that had been stretched, scraped and then dried under tension and scraped and pumiced some more.  Vellum is used to make books, manuscripts, scrolls and various works of calligraphy and/or illumination and can last over 1,000 years.  Today however the beginning scribe faces a world where many things are called vellum that aren't at all the animal skin kind and it can cause a lot of confusion.

The stuff used in drafting that is called vellum isn't the kind of vellum we use.  It is Drafting Vellum.  Great for various drafting purposes most likely but terrible for SCA Calligraphy and Illumination projects.

The stuff you get at the paper section of the art supply store, is great for tracing things but it isn't the kind of vellum we are looking for.  It is called tracing vellum.  It is perfect for use to trace things.  It is terrible for SCA Calligrpahy and Illumination projects.

The stuff you get in the fine paper section of some office supply stores that is paper isn't the kind of vellum we are looking for.  It is a Paper vellum that is excellent for many things.  It is terrible for SCA Calligraphy and Illumination projects.

There are various kinds of paper that we use in the SCA.  Some of them have a finish to them called vellum. Bristol Vellum is the most common kind.  This is a good paper to do court scrolls on but it is not animal skin vellum.

In short if it isn't cow skin then it isn't the kind of vellum that is being talked about being used by the scribes in the time period the SCA covers.
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