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Synthetic Marijuana

(Spice) (K2) (Blaze) (Red X Dawn) (Burning Man Potpourri)

Synthetic marijuana was created strictly for research at Clemson
February 9, 2012 [Kingsport Time News]


Outbreak of Kidney Failure in Wyoming Linked to "Spice"

Senators Introduce Bill to Ban the Chemicals in K2
Mar 24, 2011
The legislation, called the Dangerous Synthetic Drug Control Act of 2011 and the David Mitchell Rozga Act, is named for the 18-year-old from in Iowa who took his own life soon after using K2 purchased from his local shopping mall....Fifteen states have already acted to ban the sale and possession of the chemical compounds found in these products. Yesterday, Virginia’s governor signed into law a ban on the products as well as legislation criminalizing its sale and possession. Both measures take effect immediately.
Mar 1, 2011
DEA Extends Emergency Ban on Synthetic Drugs for Another Six Months
Mar 2, 2012
Unless legislation to increase the length of an emergency ban passes, synthetic marijuana will no longer be classified Schedule I by the end of August.
Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Five Synthetic Cannabinoids Into Schedule I
Mar 1, 2011

The DEA issued a final order to temporarily place five synthetic cannabinoids into the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions. As a result of this order, the full effect of the CSA and its implementing regulations including criminal, civil and administrative penalties, sanctions and regulatory controls of Schedule I substances will be imposed on the manufacture, distribution, possession, importation, and exportation of these synthetic cannabinoids.

The popularity of these THC-like synthetic cannabinoids has significantly increased throughout the United States, and they are being abused for their psychoactive properties as reported by law enforcement, the medical community, and through scientific literature. Some of the product names include, but are not limited to, ‘‘Spice,’’ ‘‘K2,’’ and many more. Due to sophisticated marketing, the products that contain these five THC-like synthetic cannabinoids are perceived as ‘‘legal’’ alternatives to marijuana despite the fact that they are typically advertised as
herbal incense or plant food (Bonsai-18) by Internet retailers, tobacco shops, head shops, and other domestic brick and mortar retail venues, and labeled ‘‘Not For Human Consumption.’’ Full ruling is attached below.

Virginia legislature looking to outlaw fake pot
Jan 14, 2011

Dec 02, 2010

The Drug Enforcement Agency has taken emergency action to outlaw five chemicals (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497, and cannabicyclohexanol) that are used to make synthetic marijuana, meaning it will be illegal to possess or sell them in the U.S. for at least one year.

The chemicals used to make "fake pot" products, known by a number of different names such as K2 and Spice, will be studied by the Department of Health and Human Services to determine whether the chemicals and the products should be permanently controlled, the DEA said in a statement.

After no fewer than 30 days, DEA will publish in the Federal Register a “Final Rule to Temporarily Control” these chemicals for at least 12 months with the possibility of a six-month extension. They will be designated as Schedule I substances, the most restrictive category, which is reserved for unsafe, highly abused substances with no medical usage.
[more....]

Synthetic marijuana available in stores

NOV 24 -- WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is using its emergency scheduling authority to temporarily control five chemicals (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497, and cannabicyclohexanol) used to make “fake pot” products. Except as authorized by law, this action will make possessing and selling these chemicals or the products that contain them illegal in the U.S. for at least one year while the DEA and the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) further study whether these chemicals and products should be permanently controlled.

DEA to Ban 'Synthetic Marijuana' 
December 2, 2010

News Summary 

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has enacted an emergency ban on five synthetic marijuana chemicals, The New York Times reported Nov. 24.

During the temporary ban, the DEA said they will research if the products should remain illegal, controlled substances permanently.

"Synthetic marijuana" -- which had been sold legally as incense under brand names such as "K2" and "Spice" -- is an herb-and-chemical compound that, when smoked, simulates the effects of the tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, in marijuana.

“Makers of these harmful products mislead their customers into thinking that 'fake pot' is a harmless alternative to illegal drugs, but that is not the case,” said Michele M. Leonhart, the acting administrator of the DEA. "Today’s action will call further attention to the risks of ingesting unknown compounds and will hopefully take away any incentive to try these products."

The DEA said they designated the chemicals as Schedule I substances in response to a rise in reports from hospitals, poison-control centers, and law enforcement agencies since 2009.

At least fifteen states, several localities, and parts of Europe, previously had banned or restricted the products.

The one-year ban (with a possible six-month extension) will go into effect in about 30 days.

News Release 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
November 24, 2010 
Contact: DEA Public Affairs 
Number: 202-307-7977

DEA Moves to Emergency Control Synthetic Marijuana 
Agency Will Study Whether To Permanently Control Five Substances 

NOV 24 -- WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is using its emergency scheduling authority to temporarily control five chemicals (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497, and cannabicyclohexanol) used to make “fake pot” products. Except as authorized by law, this action will make possessing and selling these chemicals or the products that contain them illegal in the U.S. for at least one year while the DEA and the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) further study whether these chemicals and products should be permanently controlled.

A Notice of Intent to Temporarily Control was published in the Federal Register today to alert the public to this action. After no fewer than 30 days, DEA will publish in theFederal Register a Final Rule to Temporarily Control these chemicals for at least 12 months with the possibility of a six-month extension. They will be designated as Schedule I substances, the most restrictive category, which is reserved for unsafe, highly abused substances with no medical usage.

Over the past year, smokable herbal blends marketed as being “legal” and providing a marijuana-like high, have become increasingly popular, particularly among teens and young adults. These products consist of plant material that has been coated with research chemicals that mimic THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, and are sold at a variety of retail outlets, in head shops and over the Internet. These chemicals, however, have not been approved by the FDA for human consumption and there is no oversight of the manufacturing process. Brands such as “Spice,” “K2,” “Blaze,” and “Red X Dawn” are labeled as incense to mask their intended purpose.

Since 2009, DEA has received an increasing number of reports from poison centers, hospitals and law enforcement regarding these products. Fifteen states have already taken action to control one or more of these chemicals. The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 amends the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) to allow the DEA Administrator to emergency schedule an abused, harmful, non-medical substance in order to avoid an imminent public health crisis while the formal rule-making procedures described in the CSA are being conducted.

“The American public looks to the DEA to protect its children and communities from those who would exploit them for their own gain,” said DEA Acting Administrator Michele M. Leonhart. “Makers of these harmful products mislead their customers into thinking that ‘fake pot’ is a harmless alternative to illegal drugs, but that is not the case. Today’s action will call further attention to the risks of ingesting unknown compounds and will hopefully take away any incentive to try these products.”
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Wednesday, November 24, 2010


CONTACT: ONDCP Public Affairs: 202-395-6618
MediaInquiry@ondcp.eop.gov


Statement from Director Kerlikowske Regarding DEA Emergency Scheduling Authority Action on "Synthetic Marijuana" (Spice)

"At a time when youth drug use in America is on the rise, it is critical that parents act today to talk to young people about the harms of drug use, including synthetic marijuana products like Spice and K2 that are marketed as "incense." I commend the DEA for using their emergency scheduling authority to protect public health by keeping these substances away from young people. Until the risks associated with ingesting these products and chemicals can be studied and understood, there is no place for them on the shelves of any legitimate business."

The Office of National Drug Control Policy seeks to foster healthy individuals and safe communities by effectively leading the Nation's effort to reduce drug use and its consequences.

For more information about the Office of National Drug Control Policy and it programs visit:
www.WhiteHouseDrugPolicy.gov ( http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/ )


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SCAD Coalition,
Mar 3, 2011, 6:41 AM
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SCAD Coalition,
Aug 20, 2012, 2:12 PM
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