Workshops&Sessions

Scaling in Global Change Studies: Representation in Multiple Dimensions

Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Thursday, August 8, 2013: 1:30 PM-3:30 PM
101E, Minneapolis Convention Center
Organizer:
Stan D. Wullschleger
Co-organizer:
Xiaofeng Xu
Moderator:
Santonu Goswami
Scaling is a fundamental issue in ecology; it requires understanding and representing ecological properties and processes at different scales and integrating this information across space, time and organizational levels. Over the past decades, scaling has become a critical research endeavor when evaluating a variety of threats to ecological systems across the planet. Global change involves a complex set of processes and mechanisms occurring at different spatial, temporal, biological and ecological scales. Integrating the information obtained at these different scales to achieve comprehensive understanding of the impacts of global change on systems is a key if we are to develop mitigation and adaptation strategies for sustainable development. Many studies have adopted scaling approaches, either up-scaling or down-scaling, to better monitor and understand mechanisms of global change across multiple scales. We propose to host a dynamic and engaging communication of ideas among researchers working at different spatial and temporal scales and on different global change topics. The session will be aimed at advancing a systems understanding of scaling, in multiple dimensions, and will be a timely effort to advance the endeavor of mitigating the adapting to global environmental change.
 Zooming out from small patches and watersheds to regions: what are missing out in the modeling world?
Mingliang LiuWashington State UniversityJennifer C. AdamWashington State UniversityChristina L. TagueUniversity of Calfornia, Santa Barbara
 The balance of greenhouse gases in the terrestrial biosphere: can we predict large-scale and long-term patterns from short-term plot level observations?
Hanqin TianAuburn UniversityChaoqun LuAuburn UniversityWei RenAuburn UniversityBo TaoAuburn UniversityJia YangAuburn UniversityKamaljit BangerAuburn UniversityShufen PanAuburn UniversityBowen ZhangAuburn UniversityQichun YangAuburn UniversityGuangsheng ChenOak Ridge National LaboratoryXiaofeng XuOak Ridge National Laboratory
 Put down that ANOVA! Using regression-based designs to deal with spatial heterogeneity
Caitlin E. Hicks PriesLawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryMargaret S. TornLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
 People, pavement and trees: Challenges in urban forests
Heather R. McCarthyUniversity of Oklahoma
 Arctic landscapes in a warming climate – Witnessing the big thaw
Stan D. WullschlegerOak Ridge National Laboratory
 ‘From near to far, from here to there, funny things are everywhere’
Colleen M. IversenOak Ridge National LaboratoryAnthony P. WalkerOak Ridge National LaboratoryJoanne ChildsOak Ridge National LaboratoryRichard J. NorbyOak Ridge National Laboratory





AGU Fall Meeting 2013:

Remote Sensing of Northern High-Latitude Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems I

Details

Meeting2013 Fall Meeting
SectionBiogeosciences
IdentifierB41G
ConvenersS Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 
D J Hayes, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 
B M Jones, U.S. Geological Survey, Anchorage 
G Grosse, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks

Abstracts

  1. [B41G-01] Cloud climatology and challenges for optical remote sensing over High Northern Latitudes of the globe (Invited)
  2. [B41G-02] Vegetation productivity patterns at high northern latitudes: do different satellite data sets agree? (Invited)
  3. [B41G-03] Observing dynamic Arctic surface optical properties with an optical sensor network
  4. [B41G-04] Spatio-temporal analysis of surface temperature and water level variability of thermokarst lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska using multiscale satellite thermal images and ICESat laser altimetry
  5. [B41G-05] Remote Sensing, Modeling, and In-situ Data Fusion for Ecohydrology and Cryospheric Studies in the Far North (Invited)
  6. [B41G-06] Extensive mapping of coastal change in Alaska by Landsat time-series analysis, 1972-2013 (Invited)
  7. [B41G-07] Landscape Temperature and Frozen/Thawed Condition over Alaska with Infrared and Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing: Determination of Thermal Controls on Land-Atmosphere Carbon Flux in Support of CARVE
  8. [B41G-08] Remotely Sensing Tundra Fire Impacts Using InSAR
Link to online archive at AGU: abstractsearch.agu.org/meetings/2013/FM/B41G.html


Remote Sensing of Northern High-Latitude Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems II Posters

Details

Meeting2013 Fall Meeting
SectionBiogeosciences
IdentifierB51H
ConvenersS Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 
D J Hayes, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 
B M Jones, U.S. Geological Survey, Anchorage 
G Grosse, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks

Abstracts

  1. [B51H-0387] Observing lake ice phenology across Alaska using in situ sensors, aircraft, and satellites
  2. [B51H-0388] Contrasting Historical and Recent Breakup Styles on the Meade River of Arctic Alaska in the Context of a Warming Climate
  3. [B51H-0389] Spatial and temporal variability in the onset of the growing season (phenology) on Svalbard, Arctic Norway - measured by MODIS satellite data
  4. [B51H-0390] Determining the extent and dynamics of surface water for the ABoVE field campaign
  5. [B51H-0391] Ground Reference and Ancillary Data Validation of Freeze-Thaw State Products of Alaska
  6. [B51H-0392] Remote identification of potential polar bear maternal denning habitat in northern Alaska using airborne LiDAR
  7. [B51H-0393] DUE PERMAFROST: A Circumpolar Remote Sensing Service for Permafrost - Evaluation Case Studies and Intercomparison with Regional Climate Model Simulations
  8. [B51H-0394] Spatial distribution of thermokarst landforms across Arctic Alaska
  9. [B51H-0395] Green up onset in the northern high latitude as observed from satellite data and the ground-based camera networks
  10. [B51H-0396] Quantitative interpretation of spectral characteristics of terrestrial vegetation for habitat characterization and mapping on the North Slope of Alaska
  11. [B51H-0397] Tundra Fire Effects Mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Data
  12. [B51H-0398] Variability and Biophysical Mechanisms of Landsat-Observed Tundra Vegetation Trends in Low Arctic Tundra: Comparisons and Contrasts in Alaska and Siberia
  13. [B51H-0399] Remote sensing of Alaskan boreal forest fires at the pixel and sub-pixel level: multi-sensor approaches and sensitivity analysis
  14. [B51H-0400] Thermokarst Lake Size-Distribution Across Time in Northwestern Siberia
  15. [B51H-0401] Identifying uncertainties for quantifying shrub encroachment in Northern Alaska using LiDAR
  16. [B51H-0402] Spatial and Spectral Characterization, Mapping, and 3D Reconstructing of Ice-wedge Polygons Using High Resolution LiDAR Data
  17. [B51H-0403] Characterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska
  18. [B51H-0404] Wetlands Maps of Central Canada based on L-band SAR Imagery
  19. [B51H-0405] Alaska vegetated land cover change detection and classification from 2001 and 2011
  20. [B51H-0406] Remote Sensing of the Arctic Coast of Alaska Using Airborne Lidar Data
  21. [B51H-0407] SHRUB ABUNDANCE MAPPING IN ARCTIC TUNDRA WITH MISR
Link to online archive at:http://abstractsearch.agu.org/meetings/2013/FM/B51H.html




Observations and Model Requirements for Understanding Drivers of Disturbance Processes in Arctic and Boreal Terrestrial Ecosystems I

Details

Meeting2013 Fall Meeting
SectionBiogeosciences
IdentifierB31H
ConvenersL K Jenkins, , Ann Arbor 
S Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 
N H French, Michigan Tech Research Institute, Ann Arbor 
E S Kasischke, Univ Maryland, College Park

Abstracts

  1. [B31H-01] Challenges in Modeling Disturbance Regimes and Their Impacts in Arctic and Boreal Ecosystems (Invited)
  2. [B31H-02] Boreal forest fires impacts on atmospheric methane, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide during the 2013 NASA CARVE campaign
  3. [B31H-03] Rapid disturbances in Arctic permafrost regions (Invited)
  4. [B31H-04] Examining boreal peatland vulnerability to wildfire: a cross-scale perspective (Invited)
  5. [B31H-05] A multi-scale approach to representing tundra permafrost dynamics in a coupled climate system model (Invited)
  6. [B31H-06] Last Decade of Changes in Ground Temperature and Active Layer Thickness in the High Canadian Arctic and in Barrow
  7. [B31H-07] Vulnerability of North American Boreal Peatlands to Interactions between Climate, Hydrology, and Wildland Fires
  8. [B31H-08] CO2, CH4, and DOC Flux During Long Term Thaw of High Arctic Tundra
Link to online archive: http://abstractsearch.agu.org/meetings/2013/FM/B31H.html



Observations and Model Requirements for Understanding Drivers of Disturbance Processes in Arctic and Boreal Terrestrial Ecosystems II Posters

Details

Meeting2013 Fall Meeting
SectionBiogeosciences
IdentifierB33I
ConvenersL K Jenkins, , Ann Arbor 
S Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge 
N H French, Michigan Tech Research Institute, Ann Arbor 
E S Kasischke, Univ Maryland, College Park

Abstracts

  1. [B33I-0577] Impacts of topography on aspen and black spruce successional dynamics in the boreal forest
  2. [B33I-0578] Optimizing burn severity assessments in Alaskan tussock tundra from optical imagery
  3. [B33I-0579] Potentiality of Ozone production over sub-Arctic Boreal forest in Alaska during thawing Period
  4. [B33I-0580] Recovery and archiving key Arctic Alaska vegetation map and plot data for the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Field Experiment (ABoVE)
  5. [B33I-0581] Analysis of Abrupt Changes in Heat, Water, and Carbon Fluxes over a Larch Forest in Eastern Siberia, After a Period of Wet Damage Due to Increased Precipitation
  6. [B33I-0582] Assessing Land Cover Heterogeneity in the Boreal Forest of North America by Integrating Remote Sensing and GIS Data
  7. [B33I-0583] The role of organic soil layer on the fate of Siberian larch forest and near-surface permafrost under changing climate: A simulation study
  8. [B33I-0584] Establishment of a Meso-network of Eddy Covariance Towers to Quantify Carbon, Water and Heat Fluxes Along a Permafrost and Climate Gradient in the Taiga Plains, Northwest Territories, Canada
  9. [B33I-0585] Modeling post-fire vegetation succession and its effect on permafrost vulnerability and carbon balance
  10. [B33I-0586] Gaps in Data and Modeling Tools for Understanding Fire and Fire Effects in Tundra Ecosystems
  11. [B33I-0587] Quantifying the physiology of structurally complex arctic vegetation and implications for carbon cycling in a shrubbier tundra
  12. [B33I-0588] A comparison in postfire ecosystem structure between two Alaska Arctic regions
  13. [B33I-0589] The Role Of Disturbance In Driving Carbon Dynamics Across The North American Boreal Forest In Recent Decades
  14. [B33I-0590] Variability in leaf morphology and photosynthetic responses of arctic woody shrubs to warming and shifts in snow induced thermal insulation
  15. [B33I-0591] Development and evaluation of ice phenology algorithm from space-borne active and passive microwave measurements
  16. [B33I-0592] Tundra fire and vegetation dynamics: simulating the effect of climate change on fire regimes in Arctic ecosystems
  17. [B33I-0593] Enabling multi-disciplinary climate science through the application of GIS and high-resolution spatial data
Link to online archive: http://abstractsearch.agu.org/meetings/2013/FM/B33I.html





Workshop in Ecological Society of America meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Next Generation Ecologists in Global Change Research: Current Status and Future Directions

Sunday, August 4, 2013: 12:00 PM-5:00 PM
Board Rm 3, Hilton Minneapolis
Organizer:
Santonu Goswami
Co-organizers:
Xiaofeng Xu and Daniel J. Hayes
Speakers:
Richard J. Norby , C. Susan Weiler , Hanqin Tian , Stan D. Wullschleger , Daniel J. Hayes , Nathan G. McDowell , Rodrigo Vargas , Xuefa Wen , Chonggang Xu , Nicole Davi , Santonu Goswami and Xiaofeng Xu
Global change is considered as one of the most serious threats to the sustainability of the human society in recent decades. Developing an improved understanding of the global change effects on different ecosystem goods and services—and being able to better predict these effects—will help society to develop better strategies to adapt to future global change. Global change research drives an important component of research directions among ecologists around the world, and the next generation of ecologists plays an important role at present and in the future. By “next-generation” we refer here to researchers in their early career stage, i.e. new faculty, postdocs and senior graduate students. Many of them are also involved in building extensive national and international research networks for fruitful collaborations to advance global change research by sharing advice, data, and methods, etc. The direction and future success of global change research depends to a significant amount on the work of these young scientists. Our workshop proposes to bring a representative group of next generation ecologists involved in global change research together with established ecologists to stimulate discussions about the current state and future trends in global change research. The panel will help continue the dialogue of research priorities and directions beyond this ESA workshop through discussions on a regular basis via future workshops. The panel discussion of the workshop will be summarized and submitted for publication in Frontier in Ecology and the Environment.

Registration Fee: $25





Workshop in Ecological Society of America meeting in Sacramento, California, USA

Next Generation of Methods and Techniques to Address Global Change Problems

Sunday, August 10, 2014: 8:00 AM-11:30 AM
McGinnis, Sheraton Hotel
Organizer:
Santonu Goswami
Co-organizers:
Xiaofeng Xu and Daniel J. Hayes
As humankind faces an uncertain future associated with global environmental change, it must prepare for unprecedented socio-environmental challenges with complex causes and indeterminate solutions. To provide the accurate and reliable information needed address these complex problems, we must develop new scientific approaches or improve and combine existing methods from multiple disciplines. Over the past decades, new and improved techniques have been adopted to address ecological problems due to global change, e.g. field experiments, numerical models, data assimilation, isotopic tracer methods, molecular approaches, minirhizotrons, etc. Reviewing the current methods and envisioning the emerging novel approaches for global change research will be critically important for us to move forward to tackle the problems arising due to global environmental change. Our workshop proposes to bring a representative group of scientists to stimulate discussions about current and cutting-edge techniques and methods used in global change research. The workshop will have two outputs: 1) the panel discussion of the workshop will be summarized and submitted for publication in EOS Trans. AGU as meeting report, and 2) participants will be invited to contribute to a review paper on the topic to be submitted for publication in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

 

The Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is sponsoring two awards to graduate and undergraduate students from US universities to attend this workshop. The link to the description, eligibility and application form for the awards can be found in the  CCSI website:

http://climatechangescience.ornl.gov/content/climate-change-science-institute-early-career-award-2014

Registration Fee: $25

8:20 AM
 Earth System Modeling
Peter E. ThorntonOak Ridge National Laboratory
8:35 AM
8:50 AM
 A Data Management Vision for Global Environmental Change
Robert CookOak Ridge National Laboratory
10:00 AM
 Mathematical methods for global change ecology
Xiaofeng XuAuburn University, AL
10:15 AM
 Role of remote sensing in global change studies
Santonu GoswamiOak Ridge National Laboratory
10:30 AM



B41I: Remote Sensing of Northern High-Latitude Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems I Posters

AGU Fall Meeting 15 - 19 December, 2014 

Thursday, 18 December 2014: 8:00 AM-12:20 PM
Chairs:  Santonu Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States and Daniel J Hayes, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States
Primary Conveners:  Santonu Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States
Co-conveners:  Daniel J Hayes, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States, Guido Grosse, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany and Benjamin M Jones, U.S. Geological Survey, Anchorage, AK, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Santonu Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States


Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Andrew Balser1, Jeremy Jones1 and Rudiger Gens1,2, (1)University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States, (2)University of Alaska Fairbanks, Anchorage, AK, United States


















 
A Comparison of Satellite and Aircraft-Mounted Thermal Observations of Freeze/Thaw Cycling of the Alaska Tundra and Boreal Forests during the Carbon in the Arctic Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) 
Nicholas Steiner1, Kyle C McDonald1,2, Charles E Miller2 and Steven J Dinardo2, (1)CUNY City College, Earth and Atmospheric Science, New York, NY, United States, (2)Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
 
Thermokarst Lake Gyre Flow Speed and Direction Derivation Using Image Matching from Sequential Satellite Images 
Shengan Zhan, Shujie Wang, Richard A Beck, Hongxing Liu and Kenneth M Hinkel, University of Cincinnati Main Campus, Cincinnati, OH, United States
 
Using Discriminant Analysis to Examine Spectral Differences Among Four Tundra Vegetation Communities at Ivotuk, Alaska 
Sara Bratsch, University of Virginia Main Campus, Charlottesville, VA, United States and Howard E Epstein, University of Virginia Main Campus, Environmental Sciences, Charlottesville, VA, United States
 
Mapping plant functional type distributions in Arctic ecosystems using WorldView-2 satellite imagery and unsupervised clustering 
Zachary Langford1, Jitendra Kumar1, Forrest M Hoffman2, Victoria L Sloan3, Richard J Norby4 and Stan D Wullschleger1, (1)Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States, (2)University of California Irvine, Department of Earth System Science, Irvine, CA, United States, (3)ORNL, Bristol, United Kingdom, (4)Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, TN, United States
 
Using geomorphology to map plant community distribution in complex polygonal tundra landscapes 
Victoria L Sloan1, Chandana Gangodagamage2, Colleen M. Iversen3, Richard J Norby3 and Stan D Wullschleger3, (1)University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom, (2)Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, United States, (3)Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States
 
Estimating aboveground biomass of low-stature Arctic shrubs with terrestrial LiDAR 
Heather Greaves1, Lee Alexander Vierling1, Jan Eitel2, Natalie Boelman3, Kevin L Griffin3 and Troy Sehlin Magney1, (1)University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, United States, (2)University of Idaho, McCall, ID, United States, (3)Lamont-Doherty Earth Observ., Palisades, NY, United States
 
Wetland Maps of Central Canada based on L-band SAR Imagery 
Jane Whitcomb1, Daniel Clewley1, Mahta Moghaddam1 and Kyle C McDonald2,3, (1)University of Southern California, Electrical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)CCNY-Earth & Atmos Sciences, New York, NY, United States, (3)Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
 
Retrieval of Understory NDVI in Sparse Boreal Forests By MODIS Brdf Data 
Wei Yang1, Hideki Koayashi1, Rikie Suzuki1 and Kenlo Nishida Nasahara2, (1)JAMSTEC Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Kanagawa, Japan, (2)University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
 
Forest patch height uncertainty from spaceborne data in the taiga-tundra ecotone 
Paul M Montesano1,2, Guoqing Sun1, Jon Ranson3 and Ralph Dubayah2, (1)NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States, (2)Univ Maryland, College Park, MD, United States, (3)NASA Goddard SFC, Greenbelt, MD, United States
 
Using Image Segmentation to Identify Tundra Vegetation Variability in High Resolution Satellite Images 
Zachary Lazow, Lauren Roemke and Michael M Loranty, Colgate University, Geography, Hamilton, NY, United States
 
Systematic High-Resolution (30 meter) Inventory of Global Lakes: Pan-Arctic and Beyond 
Yongwei Sheng1, Jida Wang2, Laurence C Smith1, Evan A Lyons1, Gary Te1, Jordan Woods1, Dorian Garibay1 and Benjamin Knox1, (1)University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, (2)Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, United States
 
Assessing Rates of Biological and Morphological Change in Northern Ecosystems Using Remote Sensing Time Series Data, LiDAR, and Gridded Climate Records 
Laura Chasmer1, Chris Hopkinson1 and Richard M Petrone2, (1)University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada, (2)University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
 
Quantitative Interpretation of Arctic Tundra Attributes Using Remote Sensing: Leveraging Field Data, Modern- and Legacy Landsat Data, and Commercial Imagery in Northern Alaska 
Gerald V Frost Jr, Matthew J Macander and Peter R Nelson, Alaska Biological Research, Inc., Fairbanks, AK, United States
 
Calibration, Compositing, and Classification of Landsat Datasets and High-Resolution Imagery in Arctic Alaska 
Matthew J Macander and Gerald V Frost Jr, Alaska Biological Research, Inc., Fairbanks, AK, United States





B54F: Remote Sensing of Northern High-Latitude Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems II
AGU Fall Meeting 15 - 19 December, 2014 

Friday, 19 December 2014: 4:00 PM-6:00 PM
Chairs:  Santonu Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States and Daniel J Hayes, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States
Primary Conveners:  Santonu Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States
Co-conveners:  Daniel J Hayes, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States, Guido Grosse, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany and Benjamin M Jones, U.S. Geological Survey, Anchorage, AK, United States
OSPA Liaisons:  Santonu Goswami, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

4:00 PM
 
Challenges and Achievements in Circumpolar Monitoring of Land Surface Hydrology with Satellite Data 
Annett Bartsch1,2, Anna Maria Trofaier3, Barbara Widhalm2,3, Elin Högström2,3, Marina O Leibman4 and Yuri Dvornikov5, (1)University of Salzburg, Geoinformatics and Z_GIS, Salzburg, Austria, (2)Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, (3)Austrian Polar Research Institute, Vienna, Austria, (4)Russian Academy of Sciences, Earth Cryosphere Institute, Siberian Branch,, Moscow, Russia, (5)Russian Academy of Sciences, Earth Cryosphere Institute Tyumen, Moscow, Russia
4:15 PM
 
Distribution of Near-Surface Permafrost in Alaska: Estimates of Present and Future Conditions 
Neal Pastick, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Department of Forest Resources, Minneapolis, MN, United States; Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies Sioux Falls, Sioux Falls, SD, United States, Torre Jorgenson, Alaska Ecoscience, Fairbanks, AK, United States, Bruce K Wylie, USGS EROS, Sioux Falls, SD, United States, Shawn Nield, Natural Resource Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Palmer, AK, United States, Kristofer D Johnson, U.S. Forest Service, Newtown Square, PA, United States and Andrew Finley, Michigan State University, Department of Forestry and Geography, East Lansing, MI, United States
4:30 PM
 
Satellite Microwave Detection of Boreal-Arctic Wetland Inundation Changes and Their Impact on Regional Methane Emission Estimates 
Jennifer D Watts, NTSG, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States, John S Kimball, The University of Montana, Flathead Lake Biological Station, Polson, MT, United States and Annett Bartsch, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria
4:45 PM
 
Is the Arctic really greening? 
John Arthur Gamon, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
5:00 PM
 
The High-Resolution Arctic; The Ubiquity of Sub-Meter Imagery in American Science 
Paul J Morin, Polar Geospatial Center, St Paul, MN, United States
5:15 PM
 
Quantifying change in North American Arctic lakes between 1990 and present. 
Mark Carroll1, Margaret Wooten1, Charlene DiMiceli2, Robert Allen Sohlberg3 and John R Townshend4, (1)NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States, (2)University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD, United States, (3)University of Maryland, College Park, MD, United States, (4)University of Maryalnd- College Park, College Park, MD, United States
5:30 PM
 
Identifying multiscale zonation and assessing the relative importance of polygon geomorphology and polygon types on carbon fluxes in an Arctic Tundra Ecosystem 
Haruko Murakami Wainwright1, Baptiste Dafflon1, Lydia J Smith2, Melanie S Hahn2, Craig Ulrich1, Yuxin Wu3, John Peterson1, John Bryan Curtis1, Margaret S Torn4 and Susan S. Hubbard1, (1)Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, United States, (2)University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States, (3)Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA, United States, (4)Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States
5:45 PM
 
Temporal and Spatial Trends in Soil Moisture in Arctic Alaska 1992-2010 
Liza K. Jenkins1,2, Laura L Bourgeau-Chavez2, Nancy H F French3 and Maria C. Chavez2, (1)University of Michigan Ann Arbor, School of Natural Resources and Environment, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, (2)Michigan Technological University, Michigan Tech Research Institute, Ann Arbor, MI, United States, (3)Michigan Technological University, Michigan Tech Research Institute, Houghton, MI, United States



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