4th Grade

Math
(4.1) Mathematical process standards. The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student will be expected to:
(A) apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution;
(C) select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;
(D) communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate;
(E) create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas;
(F) analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas; and
(G) display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
Interactive Student
(A) Word Problem Baseball
(A) Word Problems
(C,D) Grand Slam Math
(C) Estimate
(C) Be a Scientist-Estimating
(D) Rounding
Interactive Classroom
(C,D) Missing Operation Study Jam
(D) Multimedia Math Glossary
(4.2) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to represent, compare, and order whole numbers and decimals and understand relationships related to place value. The student will be expected to:
(A) interpret the value of each place-value position as 10 times the position to the right and as one-tenth of the value of the place to its left;
(B) represent the value of the digit in whole numbers through 1,000,000,000 and decimals to the hundredths using expanded notation and numerals;
(C) compare and order whole numbers to 1,000,000,000 and represent comparisons using the symbols >, <, or =;
(D) round whole numbers to a given place value through the hundred thousands place;
(E) represent decimals, including tenths and hundredths, using concrete and visual models and money;
(F) compare and order decimals using concrete and visual models to the hundredths;
(G) relate decimals to fractions that name tenths and hundredths; and
(H) determine the corresponding decimal to the tenths or hundredths place of a specified point on a number line.
Interactive Student
(B)Comparing Big Numbers
(B) Builder Ted
Interactive Classroom
(B, C) Place Values to Millions
(B, C) Comparing Numbers to Millions Place
(4.3) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to represent and generate fractions to solve problems. The student will be expected to:
(A) represent a fraction a/b as a sum of fractions 1/b, where a and b are whole numbers and b > 0, including when a > b;
(B) decompose a fraction in more than one way into a sum of fractions with the same denominator using concrete and pictorial models and recording results with symbolic representations;
(C) determine if two given fractions are equivalent using a variety of methods;
(D) compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators and represent the comparison using the symbols >, =, or <;
(E) represent and solve addition and subtraction of fractions with equal denominators using objects and pictorial models that build to the number line and properties of operations;
(F) evaluate the reasonableness of sums and differences of fractions using benchmark fractions 0, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and 1, referring to the same whole; and
(G) represent fractions and decimals to the tenths or hundredths as distances from zero on a number line.
Interactive Student
(A) Fresh Baked Fractions
(A) Fraction Frenzy
(A) Fractions
(C) Fraction Matcher
(C,D) Fractions of Something
(C,D) Fractions Side by Side
Interactive Classroom
(C) Identify Fractions
(C, D) Comparing and Ordering Fractions
(G) Decimals to Fractions
(4.4) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies and methods for whole number computations and decimal sums and differences in order to solve problems with efficiency and accuracy. The student will be expected to:
(A) add and subtract whole numbers and decimals to the hundredths place using the standard algorithm;
(B) determine products of a number and 10 or 100 using properties of operations and place value understandings;
(C) represent the product of 2 two-digit numbers using arrays, area models, or equations, including perfect squares through 15 by 15;
(D) use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to multiply up to a four-digit number by a one-digit number and to multiply a two-digit number by a two-digit number. Strategies may include mental math, partial products, and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties;
(E) represent the quotient of up to a four-digit whole number divided by a one-digit whole number using arrays, area models, or equations;
(F) use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to divide up to a four-digit dividend by a one-digit divisor;
(G) round to the nearest 10, 100, or 1,000 or use compatible numbers to estimate solutions involving whole numbers; and
(H) solve with fluency one- and two-step problems involving multiplication and division, including interpreting remainders.
Interactive Student
(A) Numbers up to one million
Interactive Classroom
(4.5) Algebraic reasoning. The student applies mathematical process standards to develop concepts of expressions and equations. The student will be expected to:
(A) represent multi-step problems involving the four operations with whole numbers using strip diagrams and equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity;
(B) represent problems using an input-output table and numerical expressions to generate a number pattern that follows a given rule representing the relationship of the values in the resulting sequence and their position in the sequence;
(C) use models to determine the formulas for the perimeter of a rectangle (l + w + l + w or 2l + 2w), including the special form for perimeter of a square (4s) and the area of a rectangle (l xw); and
(D) solve problems related to perimeter and area of rectangles where dimensions are whole numbers.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(4.6) Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to analyze geometric attributes in order to develop generalizations about their properties. The student will be expected to:
(A) identify points, lines, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines;
(B) identify and draw one or more lines of symmetry, if they exist, for a two-dimensional figure;
(C) apply knowledge of right angles to identify acute, right, and obtuse triangles; and
(D) classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size.
Interactive Student
(B) Tic-Tac-Toe Classifying Angles
Interactive Classroom
(C) Geometry Toolbox
(C) Angles Jeopardy Game
(4.7) Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to solve problems involving angles less than or equal to 180 degrees. The student will be expected to:
(A) illustrate the measure of an angle as the part of a circle whose center is at the vertex of the angle that is "cut out" by the rays of the angle. Angle measures are limited to whole numbers;
(B) illustrate degrees as the units used to measure an angle, where 1/360 of any circle is one degree and an angle that "cuts" n/360 out of any circle whose center is at the angle's vertex has a measure of n degrees. Angle measures are limited to whole numbers;
(C) determine the approximate measures of angles in degrees to the nearest whole number using a protractor;
(D) draw an angle with a given measure; and
(E) determine the measure of an unknown angle formed by two non-overlapping adjacent angles given one or both angle measures.
Interactive Student
(A,B,C,D) Geometry Tool Box
(A,B,C,D) Guess the Random Angle
(A,B,C,D) Estimating Angles
(A,B,C,D) Measuring Angles1 [mathplayground]
(A,B,C,D) Measuring Angles2 [teacherled]
(A,B,C,D) Protractor Tool
(A,B,C,D) Basic Angles
(B) Shoot the Shape - Symmetry 1
(B) Shoot the Shape - Symmetry 2
(D) Space Angles
Interactive Classroom
(4.8) Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to select appropriate customary and metric units, strategies, and tools to solve problems involving measurement. The student will be expected to:
(A) identify relative sizes of measurement units within the customary and metric systems;
(B) convert measurements within the same measurement system, customary or metric, from a smaller unit into a larger unit or a larger unit into a smaller unit when given other equivalent measures represented in a table; and
(C) solve problems that deal with measurements of length, intervals of time, liquid volumes, mass, and money using addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division as appropriate.
Interactive Student
(B) Horrendous Soup - Converting Measurements
(B) Measurement Conversions 
(B) Build a Shed Conversion Game
Interactive Classroom
(4.9) Data analysis. The student applies mathematical process standards to solve problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting data. The student will be expected to:
(A) represent data on a frequency table, dot plot, or stem-and-leaf plot marked with whole numbers and fractions; and
(B) solve one- and two-step problems using data in whole number, decimal, and fraction form in a frequency table, dot plot, or stem-and-leaf plot.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(4.10) Personal financial literacy. The student applies mathematical process standards to manage one's financial resources effectively for lifetime financial security. The student will be expected to:
(A) distinguish between fixed and variable expenses;
(B) calculate profit in a given situation;
(C) compare the advantages and disadvantages of various savings options;
(D) describe how to allocate a weekly allowance among spending; saving, including for college; and sharing; and
(E) describe the basic purpose of financial institutions, including keeping money safe, borrowing money, and lending.
Interactive Student
(E) Hands on Banking
(D) Mad Money
Interactive Classroom
(E) Hands on Banking
Science

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(1) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student conducts classroom and outdoor investigations, following home and school safety procedures and environmentally appropriate and ethical practices. The student will be expected to: 
(A) demonstrate safe practices and the use of safety equipment as described in the Texas Safety Standards during classroom and outdoor investigations; and
(B) make informed choices in the use and conservation of natural resources and reusing and recycling of materials such as paper, aluminum, glass, cans, and plastic.
Interactive Student
(B) Gabriella Cleans Up
(B) Recycle Fun
(B) Recyling Game
Interactive Classroom
(B) What's wrong with this picture
(2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and outdoor investigations. The student will be expected to: 
(A) plan and implement descriptive investigations, including asking well-defined questions, making inferences, and selecting and using appropriate equipment or technology to answer his/her questions;
(B) collect and record data by observing and measuring, using the metric system, and using descriptive words and numerals such as labeled drawings, writing, and concept maps;
(C) construct simple tables, charts, bar graphs, and maps using tools and current technology to organize, examine, and evaluate data;
(D) analyze data and interpret patterns to construct reasonable explanations from data that can be observed and measured;
(E) perform repeated investigations to increase the reliability of results; and
(F) communicate valid, oral, and written results supported by data.
Interactive Student
(C) Ice Cream Graphing
(D, F) Temperature and Bar Graphs
Interactive Classroom
(3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses critical thinking and scientific problem solving to make informed decisions. The student will be expected to: 
(A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B) draw inferences and evaluate accuracy of services and product claims found in advertisements and labels such as for toys, food, and sunscreen;
(C) represent the natural world using models such as rivers, stream tables, or fossils and identify their limitations, including accuracy and size; and
(D) connect grade-level appropriate science concepts with the history of science, science careers, and contributions of scientists.
Interactive Student
(B) Fossil Fun
(D) Famous Scientist
Interactive Classroom
(4) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools, materials, equipment, and models to conduct science inquiry. The student will be expected to: 
(A) collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including calculators, microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, mirrors, spring scales, pan balances, triple beam balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, hot plates, meter sticks, compasses, magnets, collecting nets, and notebooks; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and
(B) use safety equipment as appropriate, including safety goggles and gloves.
Interactive Classroom
(5) Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student will be expected to: 
(A) measure, compare, and contrast physical properties of matter, including size, mass, volume, states (solid, liquid, gas), temperature, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;
(B) predict the changes caused by heating and cooling such as ice becoming liquid water and condensation forming on the outside of a glass of ice water; and
(C) compare and contrast a variety of mixtures and solutions such as rocks in sand, sand in water, or sugar in water.
Interactive Student
(A) Density Lab
(B) Phases of Matter
(B) Changing State
Interactive Classroom
(A) States of Matter
(B) Infrared
(6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that energy exists in many forms and can be observed in cycles, patterns, and systems. The student will be expected to: 
(A) differentiate among forms of energy, including mechanical, sound, electrical, light, and heat/thermal;
(B) differentiate between conductors and insulators;
(C) demonstrate that electricity travels in a closed path, creating an electrical circuit, and explore an electromagnetic field; and
(D) design an experiment to test the effect of force on an object such as a push or a pull, gravity, friction, or magnetism.
Interactive Student
(A) Energy Quest Room
(C) Fidget Factory
(D) Magic Pen
Interactive Classroom
(7) Earth and space. The students know that Earth consists of useful resources and its surface is constantly changing. The student will be expected to: 
(A) examine properties of soils, including color and texture, capacity to retain water, and ability to support the growth of plants;
(B) observe and identify slow changes to Earth's surface caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition from water, wind, and ice; and
(C) identify and classify Earth's renewable resources, including air, plants, water, and animals; and nonrenewable resources, including coal, oil, and natural gas; and the importance of conservation
Interactive Student
(A) Rocks and Soils
(A) Soil Safari
Interactive Classroom
(B) US Erosion
(8) Earth and space. The student knows that there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among the Sun, Earth, and Moon system. The student will be expected to: 
(A) measure and record changes in weather and make predictions using weather maps, weather symbols, and a map key;
(B) describe and illustrate the continuous movement of water above and on the surface of Earth through the water cycle and explain the role of the Sun as a major source of energy in this process; and
(C) collect and analyze data to identify sequences and predict patterns of change in shadows, tides, seasons, and the observable appearance of the Moon over time.
Interactive Student

(A) Edheads Weather

(A) Weather Maker
(C) Seasonal Cycles

(C) The night sky

(C) Turtle Diary Seasons

(C) Seasons

(C) Why Do We Have Seasons?

Interactive Classroom

(A) Forecasting Weather

(A) El Nino

(A) Moisture in the Air (Humidity)

(A) Applying Barometric Pressure

(A) Temperature

(A) Weather in a Picture

(A) About Air Pressure
(C) Phases of the Moon
(9) Organisms and environments. The student knows and understands that living organisms within an ecosystem interact 
Language Arts
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(1) Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level stories with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.
Interactive Student
Reading Comprehension
Interactive Classroom
(2) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing.  Students are expected to:
(A) determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes;
(B)  use the context of the sentence (e.g., in-sentence example or definition) to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple meaning words;
(C)  complete analogies using knowledge of antonyms and synonyms (e.g., boy:girl as male:____ or girl:woman as boy:_____);
(D)  identify the meaning of common idioms; and
(E)  use a dictionary or glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words.
Interactive Student
(C) Word Frog
(C) Furious Frogs (multi-player)
(C) Synonym Sam's Lab
(E) VisuWords
Interactive Classroom
(3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.  Students are expected to:
(A) summarize and explain the lesson or message of a work of fiction as its theme; and
(B) compare and contrast the adventures or exploits of characters (e.g., the trickster) in traditional and classical literature.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
Flocabulary: Plot, Character, Conflict, Theme
(4) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain how the structural elements of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, stanzas, line breaks) relate to form (e.g., lyrical poetry, free verse).
Interactive Student
Elements of Poetry Quiz Elements of Poetry Elements of Poetry Interactive Lesson
Interactive Classroom
Elements of Poetry
(5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the structural elements particular to dramatic literature.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
Elements of Drama
(6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.  Students are expected to:
(A) sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events;
(B) describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and
(C) identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.
Interactive Student
Making Inferences
(A) Summarizing
 


Interactive Classroom
Making Inferences with BrainPopJr (C) 1st, 2nd, or 3rd Person (C) Flocabulary: Point of View
(7) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify similarities and differences between the events and characters' experiences in a fictional work and the actual events and experiences described in an author's biography or autobiography.
Interactive Student
Reading Comprehension

Interactive Classroom
(8) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the author's use of similes and metaphors to produce imagery..
Interactive Student
Author's Purpose Interactive Lesson Author's Purpose Battleship Game Author's Purpose Game Author's Purpose Lesson
Interactive Classroom
Flocabulary: Authors Purpose
Author's Purpose
(9) Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).
Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom
(10) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference between a stated and an implied purpose for an expository text.
Interactive Student
Think Bio Cube
Interactive Classroom
(11) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.  Students are expected to:
(A) summarize the main idea and supporting details in text in ways that maintain meaning;
(B) distinguish fact from opinion in a text and explain how to verify what is a fact;
(C) describe explicit and implicit relationships among ideas in texts organized by cause-and-effect, sequence, or comparison; and
(D) use multiple text features (e.g., guide words, topic and concluding sentences) to gain an overview of the contents of text and to locate information.
Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom
(12) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to explain how an author uses language to present information to influence what the reader thinks or does.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(13) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents.  Students are expected to:
(A) determine the sequence of activities needed to carry out a procedure (e.g., following a recipe); and
(B) explain factual information presented graphically (e.g., charts, diagrams, graphs, illustrations).
Interactive Student
(B) It's a matter of time
Interactive Classroom
(14) Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts.  Students are expected to:
(A) explain the positive and negative impacts of advertisement techniques used in various genres of media to impact consumer behavior;
(B) explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., pacing, close-ups, sound effects); and
(C) compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g. language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article).
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(15) Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text.  Students are expected to:
(A) plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals);
(B) develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;
(C) revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;
(D) edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and
(E) revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for a specific audience.
Interactive Student
(C) Making Compound Sentences
Interactive Classroom
(16) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas.  Students are expected to:
(A) write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting; and
(B) write poems that convey sensory details using the conventions of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, patterns of verse).
Interactive Student
(A) Story Creator
(A) Story Scramble
Interactive Classroom
(17) Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that conveys thoughts and feelings about an experience.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(18) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes.  Students are expected to:
(A) create brief compositions that:
(i) establish a central idea in a topic sentence;
(ii) include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and
(iii) contain a concluding statement;
(B) write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and
(C) write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.
Interactive Student
(Aiv) What is a Sentence?
Interactive Classroom
(19) Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and use supporting details.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(20) Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity.  Students are expected to:
(A) use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i) verbs (irregular verbs);
(ii) nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);
(iii) adjectives (e.g., descriptive, including purpose: sleeping bag, frying pan) and their comparative and superlative forms (e.g., fast, faster, fastest);
(iv) adverbs (e.g., frequency: usually, sometimes; intensity: almost, a lot);
(v) prepositions and prepositional phrases to convey location, time, direction, or to provide details;
(vi) reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves);
(vii) correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor); and
(viii) use time-order transition words and transitions that indicate a conclusion;
(B) use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence; and
(C) use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.
Interactive Student
(C) Blown Away game
(A) Wacky Web Tales 
(A) Grammar Gorilla
(A) Word Clues   
(A.i.) Monster Truck Verbs
(A.i.) 2 Bee or Nottoobee 
(A.i.) Verb Viper
(B) Sentence Sort 
(B) Make a Sentence
(B, C) Subject-Verb Mixup 
(A) Word Invasion
(B) Make a Sentence
(B) Title Ball
(A,B,C) Extreme Sentence Surgeons
Interactive Classroom
(21) Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions.  Students are expected to:
(A) write legibly by selecting cursive script or manuscript printing as appropriate;
(B) use capitalization for:
(i) historical events and documents;
(ii) titles of books, stories, and essays; and
(iii) languages, races, and nationalities; and
(C) recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i) commas in compound sentences; and
(ii) quotation marks.
Interactive Student
(i) Comma Practice
(A,B,C) Extreme Sentence Surgeons
(A) Wacky Web Tales 
(A) Grammar Gorilla
(A) Word Clues   
(A.i.) Monster Truck Verbs
(A.i.) 2 Bee or Nottoobee 
(A.i.) Verb Viper
(B) Sentence Sort 
(B) Make a Sentence
(B, C) Subject-Verb Mixup 
(A) Word Invasion
Interactive Classroom
(22) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly.  Students are expected to:
(A) spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(i) plural rules (e.g., words ending in f as in leaf, leaves; adding -es);
(ii) irregular plurals (e.g., man/men, foot/feet, child/children);
(iii) double consonants in middle of words;
(iv) other ways to spell sh (e.g., -sion, -tion, -cian); and
(v) silent letters (e.g., knee, wring);
(B) spell base words and roots with affixes (e.g., -ion, -ment, -ly, dis-, pre-);
(C) spell commonly used homophones (e.g., there, they're, their; two, too, to); and
(D) use spelling patterns and rules and print and electronic resources to determine and check correct spellings.
Interactive Student
(A) Everglades Spelling
(A) See 'N Spell: Blends 
(A) Waiter There's a Fly in my Alphabet Soup
(A) Scramble-Saurus
(A) Spell Check 
(A, B) Blender Game
(A) Everglades Spelling
(B) Turtle Dash
(Bi, Bii) Coconut Vowels         
(C) Spelling Bees
(C) Contractions 
(C) Contractions 
(C) Contractions
(D) The Plural Girls 
(D) See 'N Spell: Plurals 
(E) Student Dictionary
(D) The sounds of English
(B) Student Dictionary
(C) Word Confusion - Homophones  
(C)Thesaurus 
(C) Thesaurus.net
(C) FreeThesarus
(C) Word Frog
(C) Furious Frogs
(C)  Pair Words Game
(D) Wacky Tales 
(D) Build Your Own Dictionary
Interactive Classroom
(E) OneLook Dictionary
(E) Reference Desk 
(E) Thesaurus 
(23) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them.  Students are expected to:
(A) generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic; and
(B) generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(B) Reference Desk
Life as an Elk
(24) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather.  Students are expected to:
(A) follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information both oral and written, including:
(i) student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;
(ii) data from experts, reference texts, and online searches; and
(iii) visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;
(B) use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, italics);
(C) take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;
(D) identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources; and
(E) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.
Interactive Student
(A) Bio Cube
(A, B) Ask Jeeves Kids 
(B) Google 
(C) RainForest Identification 
(C) Data Grapher
Interactive Classroom
(A)  Lesson Plan for Bio Cube
(25) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information.  Students are expected to:
(A) refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; and
(B) evaluate the relevance, validity, and reliability of sources for the research.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(26) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience.  Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:
(A) compiles important information from multiple sources;
(B) develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;
(C) presents the findings in a consistent format; and
(D) uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
(27) Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity.  Students are expected to:
(A) listen to and interpret a speaker's messages (both verbal and nonverbal) and ask questions to clarify the speaker's purpose or perspective;
(B) follow, restate, and give oral instructions that include multiple action steps; and
(C) determine both main and supporting ideas in the speaker's message.
Interactive Student
Fact or Opinion Game #2
Interactive Classroom
(28) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to give organized presentations employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.
Interactive Student
Storytelling Workshop
Interactive Classroom
(29) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in student-led discussions by eliciting and considering suggestions from other group members and by identifying points of agreement and disagreement.
Interactive Student
Wacky Tales
Storyteller - You Are The Author
www.storybird.com
Interactive Classroom
Social Studies
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(1)  History. The student understands the origins, similarities, and differences of American Indian groups in Texas and North America before European exploration. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) explain the possible origins of American Indian groups in Texas and North America;
(B) identify American Indian groups in Texas and North America before European exploration such as the Lipan Apache, Karankawa, Caddo, and Jumano;
(C) describe the regions in which American Indians lived and identify American Indian groups remaining in Texas such as the Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo, Alabama-Coushatta, and Kickapoo; and
(D) compare the ways of life of American Indian groups in Texas and North America before European exploration.
Interactive Student
(B) Clovis Time Machine
(A,B) Beyond Texas History Adventures
(A) World of the Caddo (will need to turn off pop-up blockers)
(A)(B) Texas Ranch House
(C)(D) Build a Longhouse
Interactive Classroom
(A)(B) New Words
(A)(B) Texas Independence

(2)  History. The student understands the causes and effects of European exploration and colonization of Texas and North America. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) summarize motivations for European exploration and settlement of Texas, including economic opportunity, competition, and the desire for expansion;
(B) identify the accomplishments and explain the impact of significant explorers, including Cabeza de Vaca; Francisco Coronado; and René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle, on the settlement of Texas;
(C) explain when, where, and why the Spanish established settlements and Catholic missions in Texas as well as important individuals such as José de Escandón;
(D) identify Texas' role in the Mexican War of Independence and the war's impact on the development of Texas; and
(E) identify the accomplishments and explain the economic motivations and impact of significant empresarios, including Stephen F. Austin and Martín de León, on the settlement of Texas.
Interactive Student
(A-E) Spanish Explorers
Interactive Classroom

(3)  History. The student understands the causes and effects of the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and the annexation of Texas to the United States. 


The student will be expected to: 
(A) analyze the causes, major events, and effects of the Texas Revolution, including the Battle of the Alamo, the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Runaway Scrape, and the Battle of San Jacinto;
(B) summarize the significant contributions of individuals such as Texians William B. Travis, James Bowie, David Crockett, George Childress, and Sidney Sherman; Tejanos Juan Antonio Padilla, Carlos Espalier, Juan N. Seguín, Plácido Benavides, and José Francisco Ruiz; Mexicans Antonio López de Santa Anna and Vicente Filisola; and non-combatants Susanna Dickinson and Enrique Esparza;
(C) identify leaders important to the founding of Texas as a republic and state, including José Antonio Navarro, Sam Houston, Mirabeau Lamar, and Anson Jones;
(D) describe the successes, problems, and organizations of the Republic of Texas such as the establishment of a constitution, economic struggles, relations with American Indians, and the Texas Rangers; and
(E) explain the events that led to the annexation of Texas to the United States, including the impact of the U.S.-Mexican War.
Interactive Student
(A) The Road to Independence

(A) In Washington Town

Interactive Classroom
Mapmaker

(4)  History. The student understands the political, economic, and social changes in Texas during the last half of the 19th century.

The student will be expected to: 
(A) describe the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on Texas;
(B) explain the growth, development, and impact of the cattle industry, including contributions made by Charles Goodnight, Richard King, and Lizzie Johnson;
(C) identify the impact of railroads on life in Texas, including changes to cities and major industries; and
(D) examine the effects upon American Indian life resulting from changes in Texas, including the Red River War, building of U.S. forts and railroads, and loss of buffalo.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(5)  History. The student understands important issues, events, and individuals of the 20th century in Texas. 

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify the impact of various issues and events on life in Texas such as urbanization, increased use of oil and gas, the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, and World War II;
(B) explain the development and impact of the oil and gas industry upon industrialization and urbanization in Texas, including important places and people such as Spindletop and Pattillo Higgins; and
(C) identify the accomplishments of notable individuals such as John Tower, Scott Joplin, Audie Murphy, Cleto Rodríguez, Stanley Marcus, Bessie Coleman, Raul A. Gonzalez Jr., and other local notable individuals.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(6)  Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. 

The student will be expected to: 

(A) apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps; and
(B) translate geographic data, population distribution, and natural resources into a variety of formats such as graphs and maps.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom
(A, B) Maps of Familar Places

(7)  Geography. The student understands the concept of regions.

The student will be expected to: 
(A) describe a variety of regions in Texas and the United States such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity;
(B) identify, locate, and compare the geographic regions of Texas (Mountains and Basins, Great Plains, North Central Plains, Coastal Plains), including their landforms, climate, and vegetation; and
(C) compare the geographic regions of Texas (Mountains and Basins, Great Plains, North Central Plains, Coastal Plains) with regions of the United States and other parts of the world.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(8)  Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify and explain clusters and patterns of settlement in Texas at different time periods such as prior to the Texas Revolution, after the building of the railroads, and following World War II;
(B) describe and explain the location and distribution of various towns and cities in Texas, past and present; and
(C) explain the geographic factors such as landforms and climate that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in Texas, past and present.
Interactive Student
(C) Meet the people of Ft. Griffin
Interactive Classroom

(9)  Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. 

The student will be expected to: 
(A) describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as timber clearing, agricultural production, wetlands drainage, energy production, and construction of dams;
(B) identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as the use of natural resources to meet basic needs, facilitate transportation, and enhance recreational activities; and
(C) compare the positive and negative consequences of human modification of the environment in Texas, past and present, both governmental and private, such as economic development and the impact on habitats and wildlife as well as air and water quality.
Interactive Student
(A,B) How Many Ways Can You Use a Buffalo?
Interactive Classroom

(10)  Economics. The student understands the basic economic activities of early societies in Texas and North America. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) explain the economic activities various early American Indian groups in Texas and North America used to meet their needs and wants such as farming, trading, and hunting; and
(B) explain the economic activities early immigrants to Texas used to meet their needs and wants.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(11)  Economics. The student understands the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in Texas. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) describe the development of the free enterprise system in Texas;
(B) describe how the free enterprise system works, including supply and demand; and
(C) give examples of the benefits of the free enterprise system such as choice and opportunity.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(12)  Economics. The student understands patterns of work and economic activities in Texas. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) explain how people in different regions of Texas earn their living, past and present, through a subsistence economy and providing goods and services;
(B) explain how geographic factors such as climate, transportation, and natural resources have influenced the location of economic activities in Texas;
(C) analyze the effects of exploration, immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of Texas;
(D) describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of Texas;
(E) explain how developments in transportation and communication have influenced economic activities in Texas; and
(F) explain the impact of American ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of Texas.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(13)  Economics. The student understands how Texas, the United States, and other parts of the world are economically interdependent. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify ways in which technological changes in areas such as transportation and communication have resulted in increased interdependence among Texas, the United States, and the world;
(B) identify oil and gas, agricultural, and technological products of Texas that are purchased to meet needs in the United States and around the world; and
(C) explain how Texans meet some of their needs through the purchase of products from the United States and the rest of the world.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(14)  Economics. The student understands how people organized governments in different ways during the early development of Texas. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) compare how various American Indian groups such as the Caddo and the Comanche governed themselves; and
(B) identify and compare characteristics of the Spanish colonial government and the early Mexican governments and their influence on inhabitants of Texas.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(15)  Government.  The student understands important ideas in historical documents of Texas and the United States. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify the purposes and explain the importance of the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Texas Constitution, and other documents such as the Meusebach-Comanche Treaty;
(B) identify and explain the basic functions of the three branches of government according to the Texas Constitution; and
(C) identify the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Bill of Rights (Celebrate Freedom Week).
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(16)  Government. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations of Texas. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) explain the meaning of various patriotic symbols and landmarks of Texas, including the six flags that flew over Texas, the San Jacinto Monument, the Alamo, and various missions;
(B) sing or recite "Texas, Our Texas";
(C) recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge to the Texas Flag; and
(D) describe the origins and significance of state celebrations such as Texas Independence Day and Juneteenth.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(17)  Citizenship. The student understands the importance of active individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify important individuals who have participated voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels such as Adina de Zavala and Clara Driscoll;
(B) explain how individuals can participate voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels through activities such as holding public officials to their word, writing letters, and participating in historic preservation and service projects;
(C) explain the duty of the individual in state and local elections such as being informed and voting;
(D) identify the importance of historical figures and important individuals who modeled active participation in the democratic process such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, Lorenzo de Zavala, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. González, James A. Baker III, Wallace Jefferson, and other local individuals; and
(E) explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in state and local governments.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(18)  Citizenship. The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a constitutional republic. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify leaders in state, local, and national governments, including the governor, local members of the Texas Legislature, the local mayor, U.S. senators, local U.S. representatives, and Texans who have been president of the United States; and
(B) identify leadership qualities of state and local leaders, past and present.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(19)  Citizenship. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to Texas. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify the similarities and differences among various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Texas;
(B) identify customs, celebrations, and traditions of various cultural, regional, and local groups in Texas such as Cinco de Mayo, Oktoberfest, the Strawberry Festival, and Fiesta San Antonio; and
(C) summarize the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the development of Texas such as Lydia Mendoza, Chelo Silva, and Julius Lorenzo Cobb Bledsoe.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(20) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science and technology on life in Texas. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) identify famous inventors and scientists such as Gail Borden, Joseph Glidden, Michael DeBakey, and Millie Hughes-Fulford and their contributions;
(B) describe how scientific discoveries and innovations such as in aerospace, agriculture, energy, and technology have benefited individuals, businesses, and society in Texas; and
(C) predict how future scientific discoveries and technological innovations might affect life in Texas.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom

(21)  Science, technology, and society. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas;
(B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;
(C) organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;
(D) identify different points of view about an issue, topic, historical event, or current event; and
(E) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.
Interactive Student
(D) Convention Comic Maker
Interactive Classroom

(22)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;
(C) express ideas orally based on research and experiences;
(D) create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and
(E) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.
Interactive Student
(C) Create a Timeline
(C) It's a matter of time
Interactive Classroom

(23)  Social studies skills.The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

The student will be expected to: 
(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.
Interactive Student
Interactive Classroom
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