Final course grades posted

posted Dec 20, 2019, 12:03 PM by Michael Gentile

Exam 3 has been graded (the average was 69%) and final course grades have been posted to the gradebook and uploaded to Rutgers. Have a wonderful winter break!

Exam 3 information

posted Dec 11, 2019, 6:18 AM by Michael Gentile   [ updated Dec 14, 2019, 1:04 PM ]

Here are all the important details about exam 3:
  • It will be held on Tuesday Dec. 17th 4:00pm-5:40pm in Hickman 138 (not our usual lecture location!)
  • It will have the same format as the first two exams: 5 questions, all open-ended. The exam will not be cumulative. It will only cover what we've done since exam 2 (see the calendar page for details). Lab-related skills are also fair game (the 3 types of experiments, experimental uncertainty, assumptions, etc.).
  • You can bring a calculator (must be stand-alone, can't be a mobile app) and a single 3"x5" index card with whatever you want written on both sides.
  • Practice problems along with solutions are up.
  • The study session for exam 3 is tentatively scheduled for Monday Dec. 16th 2pm-5pm in the lab room. UPDATE: CONFIRMED!

Physics 194 registration

posted Nov 25, 2019, 11:04 AM by Michael Gentile   [ updated Nov 25, 2019, 11:04 AM ]

I just got word from the physics dept. that about 40 of you are not registered for Physics 194 in the spring. It's important that you get registered before you go on Thanksgiving break. Special permission numbers will start getting distributed shortly and if you aren't registered your spot might be given to someone else. If you need special permission numbers yourself a web page has been set up to apply for one. Head over to:
and sign in with your NetID. Remember that you must register for both a lecture/recitation section (sections 01-10) and also a lab section (sections 20-30). If you have any further questions please contact Katherine Lam (klam@physics.rutgers.edu). She is the physics dept. program coordinator who handles special permission numbers for the course.

Lab practical 2

posted Nov 25, 2019, 10:15 AM by Michael Gentile

The second lab practical is the week after Thanksgiving break. I've just posted it, so please download the practical and begin preparing for it. Create a Google doc and share it with your group members and your lab TA. As long as you do that at least 48 hours before the start of your lab section your TA will give you some basic feedback about your ideas to make sure you are going in a productive direction. The first thing to do is read carefully through the practical and, based on the goal of each part, determine which of the three types of experiments (observation, testing, application) each part of the practical is. Then, make sure you include all of the appropriate steps for an experiment of that type. Look back to experiments in previous labs for examples of each experiment type. Use the scoring rubrics on the downloads page of the course website for even more guidance. During the practical your TA will help with any equipment related issues you may have, but for the most part you will be on your own.

Be sure you take the time to prepare ahead of time though. If you do the practical can go very smoothly. Don't expect to be able to just sit down in lab without preparing though... If you try that you could easily get stuck and not be able to finish.

Lab 11 information

posted Nov 16, 2019, 7:47 AM by Michael Gentile

Just a reminder that in this week's lab 11 you'll be performing an investigation of your own invention. If you haven't already done so please read through the lab 11 document (on the downloads page of the course website) carefully. Then, discuss it with your lab group and put together a Google doc with your ideas. Share the document with your lab TA (with full edit rights) so they can provide feedback. Also share the document with me (michaeljgentile@gmail.com, not my physics.rutgers.edu email) so I know what you are planning. You need to share the document with us at least 72 hours before the start of your lab so we have time to reply and so you have time to revise your plans if necessary.


A few useful comments:

- Be sure to look at the equipment you will have available. See the equipment list in part I of lab 11. It will also be available for you to examine during recitation this week. If you are looking for inspiration try to think about why I would include the equipment that I did and what it could be used to investigate. However, you can also use any additional equipment that we’ve used this semester in lab. Just be sure to let me know what you need so I can make sure it’s available. You also have the option of bringing your own equipment/supplies.

- You need to be investigating something new. That means the main focus of your investigation can’t be something we’ve already developed thoroughly in class.

- The investigation must be quantitative which means the goal is to come up with a mathematical relationship (an equation) that describes your findings.

- If your experiment requires bringing some of your own equipment/supplies be sure to let us know just to make sure there aren’t any safety concerns.


Good luck with your investigations!

Exam 2 results

posted Nov 13, 2019, 11:08 AM by Michael Gentile

Solutions to exam 2 have been posted. The average was 65%. You'll get your exams back in lab this week. Also, the projected grade shown on your grade report in the course gradebook now assumes your score on exam 3 will be the average of your exam 1 and 2 scores.

Exam 2 information

posted Nov 1, 2019, 5:26 AM by Michael Gentile   [ updated Nov 2, 2019, 6:47 AM ]

Exam 2 is this coming Wednesday (Nov. 6th). Here's what you need to know:
  • The exam takes the full 80 minute period rather than the usual 55 min lecture. You need to be at the lecture hall at 2:15pm, not the usual 2:30pm. The exam ends at 3:35pm.
  • Check the calendar/syllabus page for the list of topics/textbook sections that will be covered on the exam.
  • You can bring a single 3"x5" index card with whatever you want written on both sides.
  • You can bring a calculator, but it must be a dedicated calculator not an app on a mobile device. Graphing calculators are fine.
  • Practice problems along with solutions have been posted. The final page of the practice problems is a reference sheet with conversion factors and other information. You'll be provided this same sheet on the exam.
  • UPDATE! The study session will be Sunday Nov. 3rd 4pm-6pm in the lab room.

Exam 1 results

posted Oct 13, 2019, 3:07 PM by Michael Gentile

Exam 1 scores have been posted on the gradebook. The average was 73%. The gradebook will now show a projected grade for you. The projected grade assumes your exam 2 and 3 grades will be the same as exam 1, your practical 2 grade will be the same as practical 1, and your averages on all other assignments (labs, HW, etc.) will remain the same. Solutions have also been posted. You'll be getting your exams back in recitation this week.

Lab practical 1 information

posted Oct 2, 2019, 9:52 AM by Michael Gentile

The first lab practical is next week during your regular lab period. I've posted it one week in advance so you and your group will have plenty of time to prepare for it. It's a sequence of experiments much like you do in lab each week but with less guidance. Read carefully through the practical and discuss it with your lab group members. Be sure to prepare ahead of time. If you do the practical can go very smoothly. Don't expect to be able to just sit down in lab without preparing though... If you try that you could easily get stuck and not be able to finish in the 3 hours that you have.

Exam 1 information

posted Oct 1, 2019, 10:07 AM by Michael Gentile   [ updated Oct 3, 2019, 10:19 AM ]

Exam 1 is this coming Monday (Oct. 7th). Here's what you need to know:
  • The exam takes the full 80 minute period rather than our usual 55 min lecture. You need to be at the lecture hall at 2:15pm, not the usual 2:30pm. The exam ends at 3:35pm.
  • Check the calendar page for a list of sections covered on the exam.
  • You can bring a single 3"x5" index card with whatever you want written on both sides.
  • You can bring a calculator, but it must be a dedicated calculator not an app on a mobile device. Graphing calculators are fine.
  • Practice problems have been posted. These will give you a solid idea of the style of questions to expect on the exam. The exam questions will be different than the practice problems, but will involve similar physics. The exam will have 5 questions, usually with a few related parts each. The final page of the practice problems is a reference sheet with conversion factors and other information. You'll be provided this same sheet on the exam. Any other reference information you should include on your index card.
  • I am still working on making arrangements for a study session on Sunday. Check this post for updates. UPDATE: CONFIRMED, the study session will be 2-5pm Sunday Oct. 6th in the lab room.

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