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Royal Papua and New Guinea Constabulary










 






 

   
The Coronation Contingent

















The men of the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabulary in England for the Coronation
as they arrive at Southampton aboard the liner New Australia. In the Coronation procession
 the unit, which consists of three European officers and 25 native other ranks,
will march between the R.A.A.F. and Australian Army units. The men wear skirts which
 are held up by a 6-foot-long red sash.


 

A circular, silver medal, 1.25 inches in diameter.

The obverse features a crowned effigy of Queen Elizabeth II, in a high-collared ermine cloak and wearing the collar of the Garter and Badge of the Bath, and facing right. There is no raised rim and no legend.The reverse shows the Royal Cypher EIIR surmounted by a large crown. The legend around the edge reads: QUEEN ELIZABETH II CROWNED 2nd JUNE 1953.A ring attached to a double-toe claw on the upper edge of the medal.The dark red ribbon is 1.25 inches wide, with two narrow dark blue stripes (0.09375 inches {3/32"} wide) in the centre (0.0625" apart) and narrow white stripes (0.0625") at each edge. Ladies awarded the medal can wear it on their left shoulder with the ribbon tied in the form of a bow.

The medals were presented following the coronation on 02 June 1953.







The coronation of Queen Elizabeth II as monarch of the United Kingdom,Canada,
Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Ceylon, and Pakistan took place on 2 June 1953.
Elizabeth, then aged 25, ascended the thrones of these countries upon the death of her
 father, George VI, on 6 February 1952, and was proclaimed queen by her various privy
and executive councils shortly afterwards. The coronation was delayed for more than
a year because of the tradition that such a festival was inappropriate during the
period of mourning that followed the death of the preceding sovereign. In the ceremoy
itself, Elizabeth swore an oath to uphold the laws of her nations and to govern the
Church of England. Celebrations took place and a commemorative medal was issued
throughout the Commonwealth realms.   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia        



 
 


New Guinea's Claim

To Royal Visit

Sir,-The "Herald's" report of the return of the Coronation contingent of Papua New Guinea should remind us that it was the loyalty and courage of the people of that territory which largely enabled Australian troops to stem the tide of invasion in 1942.But it should also remind us, before it is too late, of an unfortunate omission from the projected Royal Tour in 1954-a visit to Papua New Guinea. A day's visit by air to Port Moresby could probably only be managed at the expense of one day of the Royal tour of Queensland, but as the initiative of the Colony of Queensland secured the annexation of Papua* in 1883, the loss of one day by Queenslanders  should not be begrudged.






c c. m: USHER. Potts Point:







Royal Papua and New Guinea Constabulary, coronation contingent 1953  Christian Arek wearing medals and belt, with rifle 1953






 

   
 

 
ELA BEACH, PORT MORESBY, PAPUA, 1953.
NATIVE POLICE MEMBERS OF
THE ROYAL PAPUA AND NEW GUINEA CONSTABULARY
CORONATION CONTINGENT BEING INSPECTED
BY THE ADMINISTRATOR SIR DONALD CLELAND.

LONDON, ENGLAND, 1953.
NATIVE POLICE MEMBERS OF
THE ROYAL PAPUA AND NEW GUINEA CONSTABULARY
CORONATION CONTINGENT LINE UP IN BIRDCAGE
WALK AWAITING THE START OF THE CORONATION PARADE.
THEY ARE LED BY, FROM LEFT: SENIOR INSPECTOR ALEXANDER
SINCLAIR; SUB-INSPECTOR P. BROMAN; INSPECTOR W. BURNS.


LAMBETH PALACE, ENGLAND, 1953-06.
NATIVE POLICE MEMBERS OF
THE ROYAL PAPUA AND NEW GUINEA CONSTABULARY
CORONATION CONTINGENT PICTURED WITH ARCHBISHOP WARD.
TO THE RIGHT OF THE ARCHBISHOP IS SERGEANT MAJOR J. GUISE,

 












Members of the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabulary contingent which took part in the Coronation celebrations at Kingsford Smith Airport, Sydney











Members of the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabulary
 in the aircraft which brought them back to Australia after attending
 Coronation functions in England





 



The names of the The Coronation Contingent




 PAPUAN'S FOR  CORONATION Recorder Port Pirie, SA  Friday 6 February 1953, page 1

CANBERRA, Thursday.

A SPECIAL contingent of

Royal Papua New Guinea

Constabulary will   take an active part in celebrations surrounding the Coronations,   Mr. P. M. C. Hashick( sic) (Minister of Territories)  announced today. He said the contingent would comprise two or three European officers and 25 native members. The contingent's appearance at the Coronation would bring great credit to Australian administration of her mandated territories   and demonstrate the part Australia is taking in colonial affairs.  

 The Governor General of NSW, Sir John Northcott, chatting with members of the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabulary contingent which attended the Coronation celebrations


The Governor General of NSW, Sir John Northcott, inspecting  at Government House, Sydney, after its arrival back in Australian after Coronation celebrations

The Governor General of NSW, Sir John Northcott,
 inspecting the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabulary





LANCE-CORPORAL GANKI, of the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabulary, has a good head
 of hair and fuzzes it out with his bamboo comb which he made him self.




Arrival in Perth of the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabulary Coronation Contingent. Marching in St George's Terrace, principal thoroughfare of Perth. They are lead by their European officers, 


 


Coronation Contingent. Members of the Constabulary during an inspection by the Governor of Western Australia Sir Charles Gardner who is attended by Colonel E G Clements, commanding officer of the 17th National Services Training Battalion.

 

 

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SOUVENIRS of the Coronation which the hoys are taking back home include glasses, mugs, and mirrors with portraits of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh. Here,Sergeant-Majors Ligo Pala, William George, and Sairere compare their treasures.

##########

Papua and New Guinea war veterans who formed the Coronation contingent will be pleased to get home to their sunshine, but returned with glowing tales of English hospitality.

##########


GOOD MATES on sentry duty are Private "DOG"
and Sergeant Major Sairere,who like all his countrymen,
loves animals.


 

Royal Papua and New Guinea Constabulary arrive in England disemdarked from the New Australian The transport arranged , The RAN could not see fit to transport the small Contegent on the HMAS Sydney


Prince Phillip with Inspector Sinclair inspects at Pirbright Camp England 2nd June 1953

Royal Papua and New Guinea Constabulary in England

for the coronation Queen Elizabeth II





 




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Papuan-New Guinea Constabulary in England

Included among the Commonwealth Coronation Contingent, which was trained as a complete unit at the Commonwealth Coronation Camp at Pirbright in Surrey, was a contingent of the Royal Papua-New Guinea Constabulary. Here they are seen marching in full dress during their training.

                                             ########      


              PAPUANS PAY VISIT TO GOVERNMENT HOUSE


PAPUANS PAY VISIT TO GOVERNMENT HOUSE

Members of the Papuan Coronation contingent (above) giving the Royal salute at Government Houser yesterday.Papuans Proud Of Coronation Trip "We are very proud of the chance to represent our countrymen at the Coronation celebrations," Sgt. Major John Guise, of the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Constabularly, said at Fremantle yesterday.

 

SGT.-MAJOR GUISE  

Papuan At Coronation

Prefers "Simple Life"

A native N.C.O., who, with 24 other men, repre- sented Papua and New Guinea at the Coronation, said in Sydney last night:

"Modern civilisation isn't everything. We in Papua lead a simple life and our simple civilisation has many virtues."

The native, Papuan Ser- geant-Major John Guise, was senior N.C.O. in the Royal Papuan and New Guinea Con- stabulary contingent to the Coronation.The contingent reached Sydney yesterday on the way home.

Sergeant-Major Guise said: "We all very much enjoyed the trip although it was very cold at times."I will tell my people to   forget the 'cargo cult' (the native belief that big ships  from overseas will arrive one

day bringing wealth and goods fr natives only and that white men will eventually become the natives' servants).

"I will tell our people that white men work harder in their own country than the Papuan natives.


"We are dependent on the   white man working.While the   white man works we can ex- pect a good life.

"As natives we are unable to control our own affairs. If th.ewhite man does not work   that's the end of us."    

Of the Coronation, Ser- geant Major Guise said "One of the many things that im- pressed us was the genuine loyalty we saw everywhere to- ward the Queen."She has completely won the confidence of the people's hearts."That particular thing we will take back to our territory and tell all our people about it. All our people are very loyal to the Crown.

"We left Sydney on April 10 by ship, and we were very pleased when we were told we were coming back by plane."We had a rather rude shock when we ran into air pockets, and we thought we would never see our country again."Every time we hit an air pocket, some of us would shut our eyes and wish for the best."Yesterday afternoon the Minisier for territories. Mr Paul Hasluck. welcomed the contingent back at South Head Anny barracks. He paid tribute to their creditable   showing at the Coronation.

To-morrow, the Governor, Lieutenant-Genceal Sir John Northcott, will review the con- tingent at Government House.

It will leave Sydney for Port Moresby on June 26 in the Shansi.

 

The Return Home

 
 
 
 




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