Advantages & Drawbacks

All positive and negative modifiers to checks (such as using an appropriate tool, or conversely, suffering from a disadvantageous condition) are represented by the GM applying Advantages and Drawbacks to the check's 2d6 roll result. A check may have any number of Advantages and Drawbacks.

Advantages and Drawbacks first cancel each other out. For example, if a character has two Advantages and one Drawback on a particular check, they effectively have one Advantage (as one Advantage and one Drawback cancel each other out, leaving one Advantage remaining).

Advantages increase the 2d6 result by one step, up to the maximum possible 2d6 result (12).

Drawbacks decrease the result of the 2d6 result by one step, down to the minimum possible 2d6 result (2).

For example, if a character has a 2d6 roll of 10 with three Advantages, they can only increase the result by two, up to 12 (effectively 'wasting' the third Advantage; it would have increased the result to 13, which is above the highest possible 2d6 result, and is thus disregarded). By the same token, if a character has a 2d6 roll of 3 with two Drawbacks, they can only decrease the result by one, to 2 (effectively 'negating' the second Drawback; it would have decreased the result to 1, which is below the lowest possible 2d6 result, and is thus disregarded).

It is important to consider the approach characters take to each individual Scene, as past actions in a Scene can add Advantages and / or Drawbacks to future checks. In this way, the tactics and strategy employed by a group of characters can help or hinder them as a Scene progresses.