Robert Weller
Updated Dec 14, 2013, 8:21 AM
Stories and images from covering news around the world for more than 40 years.
Use template

The Beginning

COLORADO



Orphan Trains

Lakewood, Colo. It is one of the least-remembered of America’s migrations to the West: as many as 350,000 orphan children shipped out of New York on “Orphan Trains” from the 1850s to 1929.

The trains stopped in rural areas so prospective parents could look over the youngsters and decide whether to take in any of them.

The process wasn’t always successful, recalled Dorothy Sharpley, 81, one of six Orphan Train “riders” who attended a reunion Saturday in Colorado. Sharpley said she was rejected by her first adoptive family, in Columbus, Neb.

“I was sent back to New York only to ride the train again and end up in St. Mary’s, Neb., only 20 miles from Columbus.”

 

Massacre site will become monument

To Nativa Americans, Sand Creek, where peaceful Cheyennes and Arapahos were massacred in 1864, is the My Lai of the 19th century. Most Americans never have heard of it. 

CHIVINGTON, Colo.--Tribal elders swear they can hear the murdered children crying.

No signs mark the U.S. cavalry massacre that took place here 136 years ago, on the banks of Sand Creek amid the gently rolling hills dotted with sagebrush and yucca. But some historians consider it a pivot point of Western history.




A SMILE AS WARM AS A CAMPFIRE ON A COLD WINTER NIGHT
    STARWOOD, Colo. _ John Denver could make himself understood with a smile, whether in the Soviet Union during the Cold War, Africa during a famine or with Kermit the Frog.

    Stuck in an African town on the other side of the world from his beloved Aspen he couldn't resist taking out a guitar and playing “Darcy Farrow” when this reporter mentioned how much he loved it.
    Our friendship didn't end in Africa.    I first met him again in Alaska and later several times in Colorado. I also covered his funeral and musical made as a tribute, "Almost Heaven."

             

Hunter Couldn't Take Getting Old



ASPEN, Colo. - Hunter S. Thompson, the hard-living writer who inserted himself into his accounts of America's underbelly and popularized a first-person form of journalism in books such as "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," has committed suicide.
    Thompson was found dead Sunday in his Aspen-area home of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, sheriff's officials said. He was 67. Thompson's wife, Anita, had gone out before the shooting and was not home at the time. His son, Juan, found the body.
    Thompson "took his life with a gunshot to the head," the wife and son said in a statement released to the Aspen Daily News. The statement asked for privacy for Thompson's family and, using the Latin term for Earth, added, "He stomped terra."
    Remember this: The only ones who know where the edge is are the ones who have gone over it. Miss you my Gonzo friend.



    






      





  






          


   





   




                                                                                                                                     








    



        




     








    



   



   


    


 


    MARROW RECIPIENT MICHELLE MAYKIN


    BONE MARROW CHARITIES FIND NEW WAY TO GET DONORS


    DENVER _ Significant progress has been made in the past two decades finding bone marrow donors for leukemia and other cancer sufferers, but on any given day 6,000 people need donations _  even though 11 million people are on a global donor registry.

     The Denver-based Love Hope Strength Foundation, founded by entertainment insurance executive James Chippendale and British musician Mike Peters, formerly of The Alarm, has a way to boost the numbers: Solicit donors at rock concerts. Both Chippendale and Peters are cancer survivors.
     On the weekend of July 19-20, the foundation advertised for donors at Denver-area concerts featuring Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, Steve Winwood and the Dave Matthews Band. It set a foundation record of 435 newly registered donors for a music event. In the past, getting 50 was a good result for a run-of-the-mill drive.

 





SAND CREEK MASSACRE, AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY


   CHIVINGTON, Colo. — Tribal elders swear they can still hear the murdered children crying. Until recently, no signs marked the killing fields where the Colorado militia massacred more than 150 Arapahos and Cheyennes during the Civil War on the banks of Sand Creek amid the gently rolling hills dotted with sagebrush and yucca. Some historians consider it a pivotal point of Western history.




    CONEJOS, Colorado - The snowmobilers looked more like winners of the Paris-Dakar than six people feared dead in a blizzard. They beamed amid cheers as they came down a snowy mountain where they had been stuck for three days.

    They had done the smart thing when they got lost Friday in Colorado's San Luis Valley: They broke into a cabin and stayed put.

     "We just stayed in the cabin. It was safe. We were aware there would be people looking out for us. We didn't want to split up and take unnecessary risks," said Jason Groen, one of those rescued Monday near the New Mexico border.

    The six were trapped by one in a series of storms that killed at least three people across the West, unloaded as much as 11 feet of snow in the Sierra Nevada range, flooded hundreds of homes in Nevada and knocked out power to a quarter-million Californians. At least three people — two skiers and a hiker — were missing in the snow-covered mountains of California and Colorado.  WACO


    DAVIDIANS SET UP IN CABIN IN REMOTE COLORADO WOODS

 

    BALDWIN, Colo. _ Three Branch Davidians are holed up in a remote log cabin with semi-automatic weapons, a police scanner and night vision equipment. Three-thousand rounds of ammunition are on order.

   But the local sheriff says he won't tolerate a repeat of the cult's bloody standoff in Texas. 

   "If they break the law I'm going to hammer them," says Sheriff Richard Murdie.

   Sheets of camouflaged cloth or black plastic cover some of the windows of the log house occupied by three Davidians looking for a new home base after last year's shootout and fire at their Mount Carmel compound near Waco, Texas.

   "We wanted to be able to look out without being seen. Some of the people killed at Mount Carmel were shot through windows," said Wally Kennett.


 A SUBDIVISION WITH A DIFFERENCE: ANASAZI RUINS


  CORTEZ, Colo. _ Views from Nancy Reynolds' log house high above this Four Corners town resemble scenes from a classic Western film.

  The deck offers a panorama of Shiprock, N.M., more than 40 miles away, Sleeping Ute Mountain, Mesa Verde National Park and the La Plata and San Juan Mountains.

  "There's different weather on each side," Reynolds says, adding the "sunsets, double rainbows and crackling lightning make this the best show in town."

  But it's the backyard that makes her Indian Camp home unique. It has its own Anasazi ruin, left by the prehistoric people who lived here for more than 1,000 years, departing about the year 1,300. 

  Anyone who buys one of the 31 sites among the junipers, pinons and sage at Indian Camp, 6 miles east of Mesa Verde, must agree to preserve the pueblos and semisubterranean ceremonial kivas of those the Navajos call the Ancient Ones.

NOT QUITE AS OLD AS DINOSAURS

                                  



    AIR FORCE FINDS AWOL PILOT'S REMAINS IN BOMBER'S WRECKAGE


    EAGLE, Colo. _ The Air Force said Friday it found body parts in the wreckage of an A-10 warplane on a lofty peak, indicating the Capt. Craig Button was in the cockpit when it crashed into a mountain.

  "What we found was fragmentary human remains," Maj. Gen. Nels Running said. "We are not positive whose human remains they are." 

   A military lab will conduct DNA and other tests to determine if the remains are those of Button, Running said.

   The announcement culminated a three-week search for Button's plane after he veered away during a training run on April 2.

      The Air Force took advantage of improved weather at the site on Friday and lowered three special operations sergeants by cable from a helicopter hovering at 13,000 feet to recover the remains. The procedure took about an hour.

   At one point observers in another helicopter were stunned when it appeared one of the PJs, as they are called, had fallen. But it turned out to be only a pack.


UNSINKABLE LEADVILLE FINDS A WAY TO SURVIVE WITHOUT MINES


    LEADVILLE, Colo. _ In 1882, Oscar Wilde visited this rough-and-tumble mining town high in the Rockies and read the works of Renaissance author Benvenuto Cellini to a group of townspeople.

    The crowd liked it so much they asked Wilde why he hadn't brought the writer along. Wilde explained that Cellini was dead.

    "Who shot him?" someone in the crowd asked. 

    As of Friday, the mines that made Leadville a tough and pitiless Wild West outpost are all gone. But while the place is a far cry from its heyday, when 40,000 people packed the city, Leadville is no ghost town.

    In fact, Leadville is booming again, a growing middle-class community of charming Victorian homes.

    "Leadville will never die because living here becomes the most important thing in your life," said Stephanie Olson, who gave up her law practice to care for her kids and run a small scenic railroad in Leadville, at 10,430 feet the nation's highest incorporated city.






    LEAD-CONTAMINATED TOYS FROM CHINA RECALLED BY U.S. LIBRARIES


    DENVER _ A Wisconsin company is recalling thousands of bendable cat and dog toys given out by libraries across the country to student readers because the toys were contaminated with more than four times the safe amount of lead.

The American Library Association's Web site calls it "a toxic toy alert" and it reached all the way to Alaska.

    The library in Pueblo, Colo., learned of the problem from ALA and contacted Highsmith of Fort Atkinson, Wis. "We contacted them earlier this week and they e-mailed us a release about the recall," said Jon Walker, district director of the Pueblo Library. 

     "We have been calling the families and encouraging them to bring the toys back and we will give them a replacement prize," said Walker. The toys were awarded for completing a student reading program.

     The American Library Association Web site said, "A serendipitous conversation during a summer-reading promotion between an Indiana children's librarian and a staff member of Bloomington Hospital has triggered the recall of thousands of toys containing hazardous lead levels that libraries nationwide were giving out to children as program incentives."


PSYCHIATRISTS REJECT 


TREATMENT FOR HOMOSEXUALITY, SAY IT IS NATURAL


    DENVER _ The American Psychiatric Association's board voted unanimously Friday to reject therapy aimed solely at turning gays into heterosexuals, saying it can cause depression.

    "All the evidence would indicate this is the way people are born. We treat disease, not the way people are," said Dr. Nada, Stotland, head of the association's join committee on public affairs.

    "The very existence of therapy that is supposed to change people's sexuality, even for people who don't take it, is harmful because it implies that they have a disease," said Stotland, of Rush Medical College in Chicago. "There is evidence that the belief itself can trigger depression and anxiety."

    The American Psychological Association made a similar decision last year, in 1997.


TOWN ON ROAD TO EXTINCTION

STE







      

GONORTHWESTERN COLORADO TOWN ON THE ROAD TO EXTINCTION

     Dinosaur, Colo. The paint is peeling off the city’s stegosaurus and the annual summer Bedrock Day festivities canceled. This northwestern Colorado town may be on the road to extinction.


Even the release of the film Jurassic park hasn’t revved up things, says Town Clerk Wilma Sims. The biggest commerce is still people from just across the line in Utah, buying booze and lottery tickets. An attempt to legalize gambling failed.




Recent Site Activity  |  Revision History  |  Terms  |  Report Abuse  |  Print page  |  Remove Access  |  Powered by Google Sites









Robert Weller

COLUMBINE MASSACRE, AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY
                                                          

    LITTLETON, Colo. _ Two young men in fatigues and black trench coats attacked fellow students with guns and explosives in a suicide mission at Columbine High School in Denver's suburbs, killing 12 students and one teacher.
   The gunmen were later found dead in the library.
   On that horrible day, tears often welling in my eyes, there was one spot of brightness. First a small batch, then another, followed by a cascade of flowers that buried a small tree in Clement Park. I felt like I was at Lourdes.

Washington Post

BULLETIN: Two suspects in Colorado school shooting dead, police say.
By Robert Weller                                                                                                     
Associated Press Writer
Tuesday, April 20, 1999; 6:03 p.m. EDT

LITTLETON, Colo. -- Two people whom witnesses described as young men dressed in long, black trench coats opened fire in a suburban Denver high school today, scattering students as gunshots ricocheted off lockers. At least 20 people were injured, including one girl shot nine times. Others wounded were trapped inside for hours.

Two suspects in Colorado school shooting dead, police say. 




          
 

    FROM SHANTI VANA TO ETERNITY 

   SHANTI VANA, India _ Rajiv Gandhi, dutiful son, circled his mother's body seven times and touched her face lightly with a burning piece of sandalwood. Then, as hundreds of thousands watched, he lighted the butter-soaked logs beneath her. The 40-year-old Gandhi, who had already taken over his mother's office as prime minister, was now fulfilling his role as sole, surviving son, consigning her to eternity in the ancient Indian rite of cremation.
   As the flames leaped higher, he and other mourners erected a pyramid of logs over her flower-covered red sari, and Hindu priests chanted mantras and prayers beseeching that her remains be scattered to the air and ground, the wind and water. White smoke curled into the air.
   The estimated 400,000 Indians swarming over the grassy flats beside the Yamuna River raised cry after cry of tribute to the assassinated government chief, the woman who had led the country for 15 years.

*The entire staff, the late Foreign Editor Nate Polowetzky and visiting writers, including  and legendary photographer Horst Faas helped.
_________________________________________________________________

  


   STORM KING FIRE KILLS 14 FIREFIGHTERS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. _ Flames trapped firefighters battling a fierce wildfire on Wednesday, killing at least 14.
   About 50 firefighters were trapped and overcome by flames as they fought the 500-acre (200-hectare) fire on Storm King Mountain west of here, said Garfield County Undersheriff Levy Burris.
   The Weather Service had warned deadly winds could cause the fire to erupt, but somehow the message didn't reach everyone. And some of the victims, from Oregon, were not familiar with the vegetation and how readily it burned.

ESKIMOS RISK LIVES IN HUNT FOR BOWHEAD WHALE
    "Robert Weller, Chief of the Associated Press bureaus in Alaska, had the rare experience of joining Eskimo whale hunters in 1978 their pursuit of the bowhead whale on the Bering Sea. Here is his account."
    Only walrus hide a quarter-inch thick separates the whaling crew from the icy Bering Sea. At times you can see the water through the skin of the boat.
    Leonard Apangalook, the captain works the sails skillfully to search in silence for the bowhead whale.
    Preston Apangalook - the crew is made up of the four Apangalook brothers - is ready to toss the harpoon if a whale draws near. Paul stands lookout.The other brother, Mike, helps Leonard monitor CB radio traffic in Eskimo dialect on whale sightings.
    As a long-time skier I had considerable experience with cold. And I wore a $500 Arctic World AP had bought for me in 1976. Still, sitting still, I felt like I would only be warm if I was cremated like Robert Service's Sam McGee.
    
 
  A SMILE AS WARM AS A CAMPFIRE ON A COLD WINTER NIGHT
   STARWOOD, Colo. _ John Denver could make himself understood with a smile, whether in the Soviet Union during the Cold War, Africa during a famine or with Kermit the Frog. Stuck in an African town on the other side of the world from his beloved Aspen he couldn't resist taking out a guitar and playing “Darcy Farrow” when this reporter mentioned how much he loved it.
   Our friendship didn't end in Africa. I met him again in Alaska and several times in Colorado. I also covered his funeral and musical made as a tribute, "Almost Heaven."

YouTube Video




   
        
    

YouTube Video



YouTube Video




   JUST A FRIEND FROM ANOTHER STAR
   VAIL, Colo. _ Christopher Reeve DIDN'T walk by the time he turned 50,  as he once vowed, but giving up wasn't in the vocabulary of the articulate former Juilliard student.
    Instead, he kept speaking around the country, finishing a second book, battling to lift
restrictions on research that could lead to a cure to his paralysis, and exercising almost daily. 
    "There will be a cure. It is very important for me to stay in the best possible condition
to be prepared," he said in an interview at a weekend fund-raising
event for the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation. 

   GADDAFI BLOWS UP FRENCH AIRLINER, SAHARAN TRAGEDY   

      
   IN THE TENERE REGION OF THE SAHARA (AP) First it appeared like confetti in the endless sand. Then big chunks of fuselate shattered in the crash that killed all 171 aboard, came
into view. It was hard to imagine in a low-level flight over the scene that the
pieces ever came together to form a jumbo jet.
   Investigators in the Tenere Desert, the heart of the Sahara, worked in 113-degree
heat Thursday to determine a cause for the crash of the Paris-bound DC-10
two days earlier. They recovered the flight and voice recorders from
the wreckage, a spokesman at the French Foreign Ministry in Paris
said Thursday night.
   Blackened bodies were scattered across the desert.
   The dead included seven Americans, among them Bonnie Pugh, wife
of the U.S. ambassador to Chad, Robert L. Pugh. Other victims
included a Chadian Cabinet minister, two Swiss priests and eight
children.
    More than 20 years later Gaddafi was paid back when he was killed by his own people, rebelling against his tyranny.

    

    ASHES OF DREAMS IN MOUNTAIN PINES
    PINE JUNCTION, Colo. _ Down the mountain road, freshly scrawled signs thank firefighters "for saving our dreams." Patsy and Steve Kruzek have only memories. "This place may be beautiful again, but not in my lifetime," said Patsy, standing outside the stone basement of what had been a three-story home. It was all that was left of a 35-acre holding probably worth $350,000.
    Smoke tufted up next to the statue of a howling coyote, who almost seemed to be feeling the couple's pain.

   

     DR. STRANGELOVE RUSSIANS IN WAR ROOM, SORT OF, BUT WORLD WAR III AVOIDED
     PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE _ American and Russian officers claimed success Friday in their joint effort to make certain their were no accidental nuclear missile launches because of the Y2K computer bug.
    There was a little rush of excitement when U.S. monitors detected a Russian missile being launched at Chechna.
    But we all went home early because once no missiles had been launched in the first hours of Russian time we knew the threat was over.


    SKYJACKINGS
    During a two-week period in November of 1971 two planes were hijacked over Montana, where I was working for United Press International. They were among the first of a wave of hijackings. The first skyjacker, Paul Cini, was overpowered by the crew. The second was by the legendary D.B. Cooper, who parachuted from the back of a jet and was never seen again.
   Ten years later, legendary mercenary Col. Mad Mike Hoare, traveling with 40 men disguised as a rugby team, attempted a coup in the Seychelles and when it failed hijacked an Air Indian jet and forced the pilot to fly it to South Africa, where he and his men were arrested. I flew to Durban on a small plane owned by a CBS cameraman and dear friend. When I phoned the desk in Johannesburg and told them there were 40 hijackers they inititally didn't want to believe me until I told them the source was a security policeman I knew from previous encounters.
   

    ENCOUNTER WITH LOWLAND GORILLA
    Although I had once covered a Hollywood gorilla, during the making of King Kong outside the World Trade Centers, later in Gabon I met the real thing. A primatologist accidentally let a lowland gorrilla out of its cage. It threw a forearm at me, cracking the lens case on my Nikon. Meanwhile, the primatologist slid under a baboon cage for shelter. She told me to close the gate and go get help. I was torn, could I leave her there within reach of the gorrilla? I certainly didn't think I could help. But I wasn't sure I could even close the gate and didn't want to be the next target of the gorrilla. So I ran up the hill screaming in French that the guerrilla had escaped. All ended well when the boss came down and tranquilized the 400-pound animal. This did not become a news story but made the AP Log, and I was reimbursed for the cracked lens filter. I later met apes on two different assignments, without getting smacked.


    UNSINKABLE LEADVILLE FINDS A WAY TO SURVIVE WITHOUT MINES
    LEADVILLE, Colo. _ In 1882, Oscar Wilde visited this rough-and-tumble mining town high in the Rockies and read the works of Renaissance author Benvenuto Cellini to a group of townspeople.

    The crowd liked it so much they asked Wilde why he hadn't brought the writer along. Wilde explained that Cellini was dead.

    "Who shot him?" someone in the crowd asked. 

    As of Friday, the mines that made Leadville a tough and pitiless Wild West outpost are all gone. But while the place is a far cry from its heyday, when 40,000 people packed the city, Leadville is no ghost town.

    In fact, Leadville is booming again, a growing middle-class community of charming Victorian homes.

    "Leadville will never die because living here becomes the most important thing in your life," said Stephanie Olson, who gave up her law practice to care for her kids and run a small scenic railroad in Leadville, at 10,430 feet the nation's highest incorporated city.



   ANC SAYS BOMBING OF AIR FORCE BUILDING DOESN'T MEAN CIVILIANS WILL BE HIT
   The guerrilla group blamed for South Africa's worst bombing is under pressure by younger members to wage all-out war against the white-minority regime. But veterans of the African National Congress say for now, they will limit attacks to military targets.
   On Friday, a car bomb exploded outside the air force headquarters in the capital city of Pretoria, killing 17 people and wounding 188 others, including many civilians. Officials blamed the attack on the ANC, which has been outlawed in South Africa.
   In an interview with The Associated Press in Lusaka in March, Mbeki said guerrilla attacks inevitably would injure and kill civilians, including blacks, but that was not the organization's aim.

BLACK SWAN EVENTS
   The Black Swan theory holds that rare events awake world consciousness
Hopefully, the BP oil spill will turn out to be what some call a “black swan event.”

   Latin poet and satirist Juvenal used the term 2,000 years ago. “A good person is as rare as a black swan,” he said.
   The idea is that sometimes things happen that are so bizarre and impossible to predict they are “black swan events,” and some in the oil industry would say the Deepwater Horizon is one of those.
 Rare it may be, unprecedented it's not on some occasions. Just unheard of.
   Also, Australia has black swans. And, according to author Nassim Nicholas Taleb, sometimes black swan events can help wake people up.
   While the 9/11 terrorist attacks qualify, so does the rise of the personal computer.
The Lebanese-born Taleb talked about them in his “The Black Swan Theory,” written in 2007. It is possible that it is an offshoot of "Chaos Theory."
These are what are called “outliers,” events outside normal experience.
For those appalled by the spill, it may be of some comfort to know that these rare events seem to have much more effect on the collective consciousness than day-to-day events.

BEFORE

YouTube Video


   AFTER

YouTube Video




Sheriff's Killers No Match For Rugged San Juans

LAKE CITY, Colo. _ The killers of Sheriff Roger Coursey were no match for the rugged San Juan Mountains in winter.

   A month after a sheriff was gunned down while pursuing two bank robbers, the suspects' frozen bodies were found under a spruce tree on a snowy 9,000-foot mountain. They apparently carried out a suicide pact less than two miles from where the sheriff was slain.

   "I yelled for joy and started crying," said former Undersheriff Ray Blaum, who witnessed the killing of Sheriff Roger Coursey and became Hinsdale County's top lawman afterward. 

   A nationwide manhunt and a segment on TV's "America's Most Wanted" led to scores of false sightings of the suspects in half a dozen states.

   Now authorities believe that a few hours after Coursey died, Mark Vredenburg and Ruth Slater lay down under a brown sleeping bag and carried out their suicide pact with the same .44-caliber gun used to kill the sheriff.


Ancient Subdivision

CORTEZ, Colo. — Views from Nancy Reynolds' log house high above this Four Corners town resemble scenes from a classic Western film.

The deck offers a panorama of Shiprock, N.M., more than 40 miles away, Sleeping Ute Mountain, Mesa Verde National Park and the La Plata and San Juan Mountains.

"There's different weather on each side," Reynolds said, adding that the "sunsets, double rainbows and crackling lightning make this the best show in town."

But it's the back yard that makes her Indian Camp home unique. It has its own Anasazi ruin, left by the prehistoric people who lived here for more than 1,000 years, mysteriously disappearing about the year 1300.

Anyone who buys one of the 31 sites among the junipers, pinons and sage at Indian Camp, six miles east of Mesa Verde, must agree to preserve the pueblos and semi-subterranean ceremonial kivas of those the Navajos call the "Ancient Ones."




UNSINKABLE LEADVILLE FINDS A WAY TO SURVIVE WITHOUT MINES
   LEADVILLE, Colo. _ In 1882, Oscar Wilde visited this rough-and-tumble mining town high in the Rockies and read the works of Renaissance author Benvenuto Cellini to a group of townspeople.
    The crowd liked it so much they asked Wilde why he hadn't brought the writer along. Wilde explained that Cellini was dead.
    "Who shot him?" someone in the crowd asked. 
    As of Friday, the mines that enriched Margaret Brown and her family made Leadville a tough and pitiless Wild West outpost are all gone. But while the place is a far cry from its heyday, when 40,000 people packed the city, Leadville is no ghost town.
    In fact, Leadville is booming again, a growing middle-class community of charming Victorian homes.

 

JONBENET RAMSEY

   BOULDER, Colo. _ A decade after the Christmastime slaying of JonBenet Ramsey, two aspects of the case endure: the public's fascination with the murder of the 6-year-old beauty contestant, and a sense for some that the notorious crime may never be solved. Former lead police investigator Steve Thomas, who has maintained from the start that suspicion points to the family, disputes that DNA will solve anything. He says the killer is dead.


PATSY RAMSEY DIES

Patsy Ramsey, who was thrust into the national spotlight by the unsolved 1996 slaying of her daughter, 6-year-old beauty pageant contestant JonBenet, died Saturday following a long battle with ovarian cancer, her lawyer said. She was 49.

Ramsey was diagnosed with the disease in 1993 and suffered a recurrence several years ago, attorney L. Lin Wood said. She died at her father's home in Roswell, Ga., a suburb of Atlanta, with her husband, John, at her bedside.

"It is not unexpected but it is a sad day," Wood told The Associated Press.

JonBenet was found beaten and strangled in the basement of the family's home in Boulder, Colo., on Dec. 26, 1996.  


Town On The Road To Extinction

Dinosaur, Colo. _The paint is peeling off the city’s stegosaurus and the annual summer Bedrock Day festivities had to be canceled. This northwestern Colorado town may be on the road to extinction.

Town Clerk Wilma Sims (who has heard all the jokes about Wilma Flintstone) said the phones have rung with calls from people intrigued about the town after seeing the film “Jurrasic Park.” But there isn’t much to see if they brave dilapidated U.S. Highway 40 to get here.

Mayor Dennis Sims, Wilma’s son, said the town had to call off Bedrock Day because of a lack of money and volunteers.



STORM KING FIRE KILLS 14 FIREFIGHTERS
    GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. _ Flames trapped firefighters battling a fierce wildfire on Wednesday, killing at least 14.
    About 50 firefighters were trapped and overcome by flames as they fought the 500-acre (200-hectare) fire on Storm King Mountain west of here, said Garfield County Undersheriff Levy Burris.
    The Weather Service had warned deadly winds could cause the fire to erupt, but somehow the message didn't reach everyone. And some of the victims, from Oregon, were not familiar with the vegetation and how readily it burned.





ASHES OF DREAMS IN MOUNTAIN PINES
    PINE JUNCTION, Colo. _ Down the mountain road, freshly scrawled signs thank firefighters "for saving our dreams." Patsy and Steve Kruzek have only memories.
    "This place may be beautiful again, but not in my lifetime," said Patsy, standing outside the stone basement of what had been a three-story home. 
    It was all that was left of a 35-acre holding probably worth $350,000.
    Smoke tufted up next to the statue of a howling coyote, who almost seemed to be feeling the couple's pain.
Comments