Upcoming Performances

18 March 2018  @ 3:00 PM   J.S. Bach  Johannes Passion (St. John Passion - Evangelist) with The Washington Bach Consort
National Presbyterian Church  4101 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 2001
        Matthew Dirst, conductor

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29 April 2018  @ 3:00 PM     J.S. Bach Mass in B Minor  with The Washington Bach Consort
National Presbyterian Church  4101 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 2001
Gwendolyn Toth, conductor

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30 April 2018 @ 12:15 PM    J.S. Bach Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott (BWV 129) with The Washington Bach Consort
St. Peter Roman Catholic Church 313 2nd St SE, Washington, DC 20003   on Capitol Hill
Prelude and Fugue in B minor, BWV 544
Gwendolyn Toth, organist & conductor

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1 May 2018  @ 12:10 PM     J.S. Bach Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott (BWV 129) with The Washington Bach Consort
Church of the Epiphany 1317 G St NW, Washington, DC 20005
Prelude and Fugue in B minor, BWV 544
Gwendolyn Toth, organist & conductor

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Wednesday, May 2, 2018    7:30 PM   Opera Lafayette and the National Gallery Singers  led by Ryan Brown
Terrace Theater, John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (map)
 Our final program is a musical journey through the reigns of Louis XIV, XV, and XVI, 
featuring music from Lully’s Acis et Galatée to Grétry’s Richard, Cœur de Lion, 
inspired by The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition Visitors to Versailles (1682 – 1789).

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Thursday, May 3, 2018     7:00 PM   Opera Lafayette and the National Gallery Singers led by Ryan Brown
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium, The Metropolitan Museum of Art NY, NY (map)
 Our final program is a musical journey through the reigns of Louis XIV, XV, and XVI, 
featuring music from Lully’s Acis et Galatée to Grétry’s Richard, Cœur de Lion, 
inspired by The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition Visitors to Versailles (1682 – 1789).

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Tenor Robert Petillo is one of the enduring joys of the local early music scene.  --The Washington Post


Robert Petillo was fluid and authoritative in the Evangelist’s Gospel recitatives. His high range, precise and floating in quality, was well suited to the arias, too, as in “Frohe Hirten, eilt,” where he was supported by the extraordinary obbligato of traverso soloist Colin St-Martin. 
--Charles Downey 10 December 2017, reviewing the Washington Bach Consort's Christmas Oratorio in Washington Classical Review 

As the Evangelist, tenor Robert Petillo conveyed the sense of the Christmas story with  fervor.  With a delivery that ranged from sweet and dulcet to declamatory, Petillo was always consistent and thematically threaded together the age old Christmas story seamlessly.
--Patrick D. McCoy, 11 December 2017

Marsh also drew fine performances from his soloists, especially tenor Robert Petillo, whose Evangelist was artfully communicative....
--Patrick Rucker, 10 December 2017  reviewing the Bach Consort's Christmas Oratorio in The Washington Post

After the well-known opening chorus is framed by kettle drums and trumpets, the Evangelist starts singing the Christmas story.  Consort veteran Robert Petillo impressed with his laser-focused voice and heart-felt interpretation throughout.  He combined the right amount of phrasing and expression with an appropriate amount of vibrato.    
-- Roger Custer,  10 December 2017  on his musical blog BWV 1129 "Concert Review: Christmas Oratorio Features Vocal Fireworks"

The Ascension Oratorio: Lobet Gott in Seinem Reichen, BWV 11 seemed to be a concerted effort to summon the angels of God...Tenor Robert Petillo shined throughout the work.  Not only did he sing with a lovely tone, but brought an emotional bearing to each phrase."   
-- Patrick McCoy, The Examiner  April 30, 2012  
( complete review : Examiner review of WBC 4/30/12 )

Often, composers use musical material from previously composed works in the context of a new one.  Bach's Missa Brevis in G minor is a prime example of this common practice...  As Maestro Lewis explained to the audience before taking the podium, this particular choral work has quotes from the towering Mass on B minor.  That was especially evident in the solo aria for tenor, 'Qui Tollis' which seemed to be a more expansive take on a previously musical theme from the larger work. Here, tenor Robert Petillo gave a sterling performance with elegant phrasing that was the perfect vehicle for the clarion brilliance of his voice.  
--The Washington Post, 29 April 2012   reviewing the "Heaven On Earth" concert by the Washington Bach Consort


Listen:  Rob's Playlist 

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