“Green” Language Resources
A collection of books for the study of Biblical Languages, whose author's last name happens to be my favorite color. Each of these books was published before 1923 and has therefore fallen into the public domain in the United States, allowing me to scan them and "republish" them in digital form (.pdf, printable B/W, 600 dpi). Enjoy!
 


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A Handbook to Old Testament Hebrew by Samuel G. Green D.D

This book was published before 1923, and therefore has fallen into the Public Domain in the USA. In my opinion, this is an excellent study resource. I found this book in an old library during the Summer of 2007, and began studying out of it. It is probably not the easiest tool out there, but it is high quality. I bought a copy of my own and digitized it so that now anyone can download it and use it for their own study. Find out how by clicking here.

Please note that this resource is for the study of Old Testament Hebrew Language - which does vary from the Modern Hebrew Language in some respects.




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Handbook to the Grammar of the Greek Testament by Samuel G. Green D.D.

Here is another public domain book by the same author. This book is significantly larger because it includes a complete Greek Vocabulary at the end, which was later published as a separate reference tool. As with its Hebrew counterpart, I will tell you up front that this is not the easiest

and fastest tool out there for learning New Testament Greek – but I believe it is high quality. The digitized version of this book comes in three parts – Introduction, Main Text, and Vocabulary/Indexes.

 

Please note that this resource is for the study of New Testament Greek Language – which is not the same thing as Classical Greek or (of course) Modern Greek. (It's all Greek to me, but the experts tell me there is a difference.)


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A Brief Introduction to New Testament Greek by Samuel G. Green D.D.,

with Key by Samuel W. Green M.A.

This book is also in the public domain. It was originally published as two separate works, and was later bound into one. (It actually contains two separate title pages, with two different years of publication printed: 1913 and 1912.) It is a brief introduction to Greek, but that is in comparison to the work from which it was derived. There is still a good deal to it. One really nice thing about this book is that it comes with an answer key, something the larger works are noticeably lacking.


In case you were wondering, Samuel W. Green is the son of Samuel Gosnell Green (1822-1905).

 

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A Grammar of the Hebrew Language by William Henry Green

This book from 1872 is absolutely fascinating - with inconsistent page formatting, a Table of Contents with section numbers instead of page numbers, and book divisions marked as "Part First", "Part Second", and "Part Third".

 

I was first drawn to this book by the fact that it gave the Hebrew spellings for Hebrew letters and grammatical terms, not just their English equivalents.

 

It should be noted that William Henry Green takes a different approach to the language from Samuel Green, particularly (I have noticed) in his treatment of English equivalents for consonants, and the classification of Vowels. Therefore, this book is not redundant - but is a nice compliment to Samuel Green's work, offering a fresh and interesting perspective (though in fact it is the older of the two).

 

Please note (again) that this resource is for the study of Old Testament Hebrew Language - which does vary from the Modern Hebrew Language in some respects.