Walter Richard Brookins bibliography

Walter Richard Brookins (July 11, 1889 – April 29, 1953), was the first pilot trained by the Wright brothers.
  • New York Times; February 18, 1910; Walter Brookins Will Test Device Similar to That Used on Automobiles. Palm Beach, Florida; February 17, 1910. Experimental work with the aeroplane will be undertaken for the first time in Florida this week, when Walter Brookins, the American aviator, tries out on his flying machine a self-starting device similar to that used on automobiles. Aviators the world over have long been anxious to see this improvement made on flying machines so as to be able to ...
  • New York Times; June 18, 1910; Brookins in Airship Soars 4,503 Feet; He Breaks World's Record for Altitude at Indianapolis in Flight of 1 1/2 Hours. Indianapolis, Indiana; June 17, 1910. Walter Brookins, in a Wright biplane, broke the world's aeroplane record for altitude today, when he soared to a height of 4,503 feet, according to the measurement of the altimeter. His motor stopped as he was descending, and he made a cross-country glide of two miles, landing easily in a wheat field.
  • Washington Post; June 18, 1910; Motor Clogs Far Aloft, but Brookins Descends Safely. Breaks Altitude Record. Daring Aviator, in Wright Biplane, Reaches Height of 4,503 Feet Over the Indianapolis Speedway. Lands After Accident in Wheat Field, Where Farmer With Shotgun Awaits Tresspassers. Indianapolis, Indiana, June 17, 1910. Walter Brookins, in a Wright biplane, broke the world's aeroplane record for altitude today, when he soared to a height of 4,603 feet, according to the measurement of the altimeter. His motor stopped as he was descending, and he made a glide of 2 miles, landing easily in a wheat field.
  • New York Times; August 23, 1910; Aviator Brookins in Surprising Feats; Airmen, Viewing His Exhibition at Asbury Park, Say It Opens- a New Era. "Corkscrew Twists" and "Nose-On Dives". New Evolutions Never Attempted Before from Any Field. Aviation Field, Asbury Park, New Jersey, August 22, 1910. Walter Brookins got out of the new Wright biplane this afternoon more twists and turns and high and low dives than any one here except the masters themselves, had thought possible. In one flight his machine came down for 1,000 feet as if it were twisting about a corkscrew, and then Brookins sent it on a ...
  • Washington Post; September 25, 1910; Brookins To Fly 190 Miles. Aviator Will Attempt to Reach Spring- field, Ill., From Chicago. Chicago, September 24, 1910. Walter R. Brookins, aviator, will attempt a flight with a Wright brothers' aeroplane from Chicago to Springfield, Illinois, Thursday in an effort to win a $10,000 purse. He will make preliminary trials on the lake front Tuesday and Wednesday, when he will attempt flights across the downtown district and also out some distance above Lake Michigan.
  • New York Times; September 30, 1910; Springfield, Illinois. Longest American Flight by Brookins; With Two Stops He Goes in Wright Biplane from Chicago to Springfield, 187 Miles. Loses Wheel, But Goes On. Declares It Was a Trying Experience. Believes Chicago to New York Race Is Practicable.
  • Washington Post; February 6, 1911; Brooks Sued by Wife. Asking Divorce, She Seeks to Restrain Payment of Airman's Prizes. Cincinnati, Ohio, February 5, 1911. Walter Brookins, the famous aviator, and member of the Wright team, has been sued for divorce by his wife, Mrs. Miriam Brookins, who charges desertion.
  • New York Times; December 11, 1911; Aviator Predicts 100-mile Airships; Walter Brookins Thinks We Shall Soon Have Aeroplanes Crossing the Seven Seas. Aeroplanes for next season, according to Walter Brookins, will be able to make from 90 to 100 miles an hour, where they now make from 50 to 60 miles. He predicts that they will be able to make long voyages over seas, to alight in the ocean, start again from the water, and "trim sail" afloat in the air.
  • New York Times; April 30, 1953; Obituary.