Lincoln J. Beachey bibliography

Lincoln J. Beachey (March 3, 1887 – March 14, 1915), was a pioneer American aviator and early star performer. He was known as The Man Who Owns the Sky, and the Master Birdman
  • Oakland Tribune; Oakland, California; March 6, 1905;  ... demonstrations yesterday were made by two young men, Lincoln Beachey and David Wilkie, both members of the Pacific Motor Cycle Club, who volunteered ... 
  • New York Times; June 4, 1906; page 1; Falls With his Airship. Propeller Cuts the Gas Bag. Aeronaut Narrowly Escapes Death. Cleveland, Ohio; June 3, 1906. Lincoln J. Beachey, a Toledo aeronaut, lost control of his airship to-day while 1,000 feet from the ground, and when the disabled machine fell heavily he was under it. He was unconscious when dragged out, but revived soon and was found to be uninjured.
  • New York Times; June 5, 1906; Lincoln J. Beachey, the Toledo aeronaut who had a particularly exciting experience with a Knabenshue airship at Cleveland on Sunday, is evidently a man with the qualities that are needed for solving the problem of aerial navigation -- and other difficult problems as well, if he happens to turn his attention to them.
  • New York Times; June 15, 1906; White House And Capital Upset By An Airship; Executive Mansion Staff And Congressmen Run To The Show. Loeb Sternly Calls Police But Aeronaut Calmly Makes Repairs On White Lot And Resumes Flight, While All Washington Stares. Washington, June 14, 1906. Executive and legislative Washington abandoned business for an hour or more this morning and gave itself up to joyous, neckcraning contemplation of a young man sailing around in an airship and making passing inspections of the top of the monument and the tip of the Capitol dome.
  • New York Times; September 24, 1906; Man In Blazing Airship. Aeronaut's Presence Of Mind At Baltimore Saved His Life. Baltimore, September 23, 1906. Lincoln Beachey, the aeronaut, had a narrow escape from death this afternoon while suspended on his airship several hundred feet above Electric Park. The gasoline tank, which supplies the motor of the ship, sprang a leak, and the fluid catching fire enveloped the tank and motor in blue flame and made the explosion of the tank imminent.
  • New York Times; June 26, 1907; Flies To Manhattan, Drops In The River; Aeronaut Beachey Clings To A Buoy Near Hell Gate Till Rescuers Come. Had A Broken Propeller Crowd Smashed It In Battery Park When He Traveled By Air Line From Richmond. Flies To Manhattan, Drops In The River.
  • Washington Post; June 26, 1907; New York, Wreck In Mid Air. Aeronaut Clings To Spar Far Above East River. Rowboat Goes To Rescue Disaster Follows Successful Trip, Which Amazes New Yorkers. Lincoln Beachey, Starting From South Beach In Dirigible Balloon, Drops Paper Bombs Upon Forts Hamilton And Wadsworth, And Lands Gracefully In Battery Park. Return Trip Cuts Figure Eight Over Lower Manhattan. June 25, 1907. Lincoln Beachey, of Toledo, Ohio, threw his arms around the tall steel spar of Spindle Light in the East River this afternoon, clung to it lovingly and yelled for help. The punctured gas bag of Beachey's air ship hung from the top of the thirty-foot spar and flapped about his ears.
  • Washington Post; July 7, 1907; Beachey's Air Ship at Luna Park. So unlocked for and incredibly daring are the flights that are being made by Lincoln Beachey and his most practical of all air ships, that last season's ascensions are dwarfed to a point of inconsequentialness. Fancy Beachey passing over nine States in less than six hours and finding time in the interim to make a few social calls, and you can form some idea of the rapid and kaleidoscopic gait and itinerant temperament of this most notable of all aerial navigators.
  • New York Times; October 12, 1907; Perilous Ride In Airship. Young Aeronaut, Whirled By Gale, Finally Lands In Safety. Clowry To Resign? Denial And Alleged Confirmation Of A Report He Will Not Discuss. York, Pennsylvania, October 11, 1907. While trying to make a flight in his airship to-day, while a brisk gale was blowing, Lincoln Beachey, a young aeronaut, almost lost his life. Beachey made his ascent from the oval inside the race course, and soon after he arose it was seen that he was having difficulty.
  • New York Times; October 20, 1907; Aeronauts Ready For The Big Race; Will Start At St. Louis To-Morrow In Contest For The Bennett Cup. Balloons Are Guarded Record Of 475 Miles Made By Chandler And Mccoy Takes The Lahm Cup. St. Louis, October 19, 1907. Every detail of the arrangements for Monday's international balloon race and the remainder of the week's aeronautic programme is now complete. Severe weather is the only thing that can prevent the St. Louis Aero Club from carrying through the greatest air-flying tournament in the history of the sport in this country.  
  • New York Times; June 3, 1908; Aeronaut In Peril In Broken Airship; Beachey's Wife Saw Him Fall In His Balloon And Thought He Had Been Killed. The Motor Broke Down When He Was Making A Trial Trip At Jamaica. Landed In A Blackberry Patch Practically Unhurt. High up in the air over the town of Jamaica an aeronaut lost control of his dirigible balloon at dusk last night, and, while his wife on a hilltop far below breathlessly watched him through a pair of night glasses, soared downward and fell into a brier patch with the big balloon on top of him.
  • New York Times; July 24, 1908; page 2; Airship Beats Auto. Lincoln Beachey Claims New Record, Flying 14 Miles In 33 Minutes. White House and Capitol upset by an airship; Executive mansion staff and Congressmen run to the show. Loeb sternly calls police but aeronaut calmly makes repairs on White lot and resumes flight, while all Washington stares. Washington, District of Columbia; June 14, 1906. Executive and legislative Washington abandoned business for an hour or more this morning and gave itself up to joyous, neckcraning contemplation of a young man sailing around in an airship and making passing inspections of the top of the monument and the tip of the Capitol dome.
  • New York Times; July 24, 1908; Baltimore, Maryland; July 23, 1908; Lincoln Beachey, who is making daily and nightly flights in his airship from a suburban amusement resort, asserts that he made new records both for distance and speed in a flight this morning from Arlington to and around the City Hall. The distance, fourteen miles, was made without a stop in 33 minutes.
  • New York Times; March 7, 1909; Airships in Mexico. Beachey Gave Natives Their First View of Flying Machine.Airships In Mexico.; Beachey Gave Natives Their First View Of Flying Machine. Lincoln Beachey visited the rooms of the Aero Club of America last week and related some interesting stories of his recent flights at Mexico City with his sixty-five-foot airship. Mr. Beachey's dirigible was the first big flying machine ever seen in Mexico, and he made thirty-seven flights there during the last two months.
  • New York Times; May 6, 1911; Washington, May 5, 1911. Circles Capitol Dome. Lincoln Beachey Inaugurates Washington Meet With Long Flight. Ascending at Benning race track this afternoon Lincoln Beachey, the aviator, flew over the eastern section of Washington and circled the Capitol building high above the dome. This feat inaugurated Washington's three days' aviation meet. It is the first time that an aviator has circled the Capitol building in a heavier-than-air machine.
  • New York Times; June 28, 1911; Beachey In Biplane Skims Niagara River; Flies Through Mist Of Horseshoe Falls And Dives Under Upper Steel Bridge. Buffalo, New York, June 27, 1911. Sweeping down from an immense height in a shower of rain, Lincoln Beachey, an aeronaut in a biplane, to-day passed, over the Horseshoe Falls, under the steel arch bridge, on down the Gorge almost to the Whirlpool Rapids, then rose, mounted again, and, shaving the wooded cliff, landed safely aand unconcerned on the Canadian side.
  • New York Times; October 5, 1911; Beachey's Brother Hurt. Flier Falls Fifty Feet at St. Louis and Wrecks His Aeroplane. St. Louis, Missouri, October 4, 1911. Twenty-five thousand spectators saw Hillary Beachey, brother of Lincoln Beachey, the aviator pilot, fall fifty feet from an aeroplane today at Fair Ground. It is the second serious fall he has had in a month.
  • New York Times; October 18, 1912;  Aeroplane Duck Shooting.; Beachey And Brereton Bag Four While Flying Over The Potomac. Washington, October 17, 1912. Duck shooting was added to the list of aviation sports to-day. Lincoln Beachey, the airman, and Lieut. L.H. Brereton of the army had the experience, and they declared tonight, as they picked the bones to toothsome redheads, that the thing was easy and exhilarating.
  • New York Times; May 13, 1913; page 6; Beachey will fly no more. Aviator Feels That He Has Led Others to Death and So He Quits. San Francisco, California; May 12, 1913. Lincoln Beachey the aviator, will never fly again, according to what he himself said last night at the Olympic Club.
  • Washington Post; October 8, 1913; Girl Killed By Aero. Her Sister Badly Hurt When Machine Strikes Spectators. Two Naval Officers Injured. Miss Ruth Hildreth, Of New York, Perishes When Lincoln Beachey Loses Control Of His Car, Which Sweeps Sightseers From Roof At Hammondsport, New York. Dorothy Hildreth Also Hurt.Rochester, New York, October 7, 1913; Miss Ruth Hildreth, daughter of W.E. Hildreth, of New York city, was killed and her sister, Dorothy Hildreth, was perhaps fatally injured this afternoon, in Hammondsport when Lincoln Beachey lost control of a 100-horsepower aeroplane and it swept a number of spectators off a roof from which they were watching the exhibition.
  • New York Times; October 13, 1913; page 3; Not Attempting a Feat When Young Woman Was Killed, He Says. Hammondsport, New York; October 12, 1913. Lincoln Beachey, the aeroplanist, whose aeroplane in a flight last Tuesday caught several persons, killing one, a young woman, was able to get up today. He has been confined to his bed since the accident, recovering slowly from the nervous shock and from the bruises and strains sustained in his fall.
  • New York Times; November 19, 1913; page 1; San Diego, California. Beachey Loops the Loop.
  • NewYork Times; February 6, 1914; Possible, Says Beachey.; But He Says There Should Be A Sufficient Ocean Patrol. Los Angeles February 5, 1914. "With the progress aviation has made during the past few years, anything is possible," stated Lincoln Beachey to-night. "It certainly will be possible for an aeroboat such as the Wanamaker craft to cross the ocean, provided there is enough outside assistance.
  • New York Times; May 23, 1914; Daring Stunts At Brighton; Beachey And Oldfield Provide Thrillers In Monoplane And Auto. Lincoln Beachey, aviator, and Barney Oldfield, automobile driver, gave an enthusiastic lot of spectators an afternoon of thrills at the Brighton Beach race track yesterday afternoon. The track was a bit too soggy in spots for Oldfield to do his best, but with a light breeze and clear sky Beachey was more fortunate.
  • Washington Post; July 13, 1914; Oversea Flight To End In Tragedy Or Fiasco, Says Lincoln Beachey. By Lincoln Beachey. I hope they get across. For their own sakes, as well as for the sake of aviation in general, I hope that Lieut. Porte and his aid are successful in crossing the Atlantic in the aeroplane flight scheduled for the near future -- but I don't believe they will be. I can see no termination to the announced attempt but fiasco or tragedy.
  • Washington Post; September 28, 1914; To Soar Over Capitol. Lincoln Beachey Will Fly Today For Congressmen. Flight At White House Also Aviator's Visit To Washington Is Avowedly For The Purpose Of Interesting Congress In The Development Of The Aviation Branches Of Army And Navy. Performances Promoted By Capt. Bristol. Lincoln Beachey, aviator, will fly over the White House and Capitol this morning between 11 and 12 o'clock in order to arouse interest of congressmen in the development of the aviation branches of the United States army and navy.
  • New York Times; September 29, 1914; Wilson Sees Beachey Fly. Aviator Loops the Loop and Circles Capitol Dome. Washington, September 28, 1914. President Wilson and many Senators and Representatives today saw Lincoln Beachey loop the loop and do other daring air feats in a biplane of his own manufacture. Beachey sailed past the Washington Monument and made circles around the dome of the Capitol, while members of Congress and a large proportion of the population of Washington craned their necks and wondered.
  • New York Times; March 15, 1915; page 1; Beachey killed in a TaubeI drop; Air Pressure Crumples Monoplane's Wings as Airman Tries to Resume Glide. Crowd of 50,000 horrified. Machine and Aeroplanist Fall Into San Francisco Bay. Recovered by Navy Diver. Brother saw his plunge. Fatal Perpendicular Drop from 3,000 Feet Like Feat Beachey Often Had Executed in Biplane. San Francisco, California; March 14, 1915. Lincoln Beachey, noted as an aviator the world over and perhaps the greatest rival of the Frenchman, Pegoud, in the execution of hair-raising aerial feats, fell to his death here today in the new German Taube monoplane in which he had been attempting to duplicate the spectacular performances of which, in the biplane, he was the acknowledged master.
  • Oakland Tribune; Oakland, California; March 10, 2005; The San Francisco man who was first to fly upside down, master the loop, fly inside a building and pick up a handkerchief on the ground with his plane's wingtip will be commemorated this weekend at the Hiller Aviation Museum. The museum is observing the 90th anniversary of the death of Lincoln Beachey, the man many call the "Father of Aerobatics," with a Saturday lecture by author Frank Marrero. Marrero brought together 30 years of