Albert J. Adams bibliography

Albert J. Adams (1845 – October 1, 1906) the The Policy King ran the numbers game in New York City from around 1890 to around 1905.

 

He was born in Massachusetts and moved to New York City. He was named by the Lexow Committee, and was replaced by Peter H. Matthews when he retired. The anonymous testifier at the Lexow Committe in 1894 said: "Al has the most ... sheets, and he is the biggest man, and has the most money, and has the biggest pile. ... He is called the king of the policy dealers. ... Al Adams has from Fourteenth street up on the west side mostly." After a 1901 raid on his gambling operation, the police estimated that he was making more than $1 million a year, and after his conviction in 1903 it was revealed that he had been released by the judge to stay at the Waldorf-Astoria until sentencing. He was sentenced to a year in prison, and he committed suicide at the Ansonia Hotel in 1906. The funeral was held at 471 West End, he was 61 years old.

  • New York Times; May 19, 1883, Wednesday; Policy-dealers Punished. Yesterday was a field day for Anthony Comstock. [Note: Policy Dealers]
  • New York Times; April 5, 1884, Wednesday; Police And Policy Mixed; Seeking Truth From Unwilling Witnesses.Dense Ignorance Regarding A Certain "Police Fund". Wonderful Growth Of Candidates For The Force. The entire Police Department seemed to have been transferred bodily to the Metropolitan Hotel, where the Roosevelt investigating committee was sitting, yesterday Commissioners French, Mason, Nichols, and Matthews, Inspectors Byrne and Murray, Chief Clerk Seth C. Hawley, and John J. O'Brien passed the greater part of the morning listening to the testimony of policy men and gamblers. [Note: Policy Dealers]
  • New York Times; October 12, 1894, Wednesday; Paid $500 To Schmittberger; Forget Says This Tribute Went To The Police Captain. The Agent Of The French Line Tells The Lexow Committee Of The Money Transaction. Complete Exposure Of The Policy Business In This City. A List Of 600 Places Where The Gambling Was Conducted. Only One Precinct Free From The Evil. "Al has the most ... sheets, and he is the biggest man, and has the most money, and has the biggest pile. ... He is called the king of the policy dealers. ... Al Adams has from Fourteenth Street up on the west side mostly."
  • New York Times; December 18, 1901; Policy Shop Protection; Frank Moss Believes Each Paid $20 a Month to the Police. Evidence Found in Papers Taken in Recent Raid. Believed to be in Albert J. Adams's Handwriting. Twenty dollars per month per policy shop is believed by ex-Police Commissioner Frank Moss to be the price paid the police for protection by the "Policy King," according to a statement made by him yesterday at the headquarters of the Society for the Prevention of Crime.
  • New York Times; October 8, 1905; "Al" Adams Has Quit. Says He's Dropped Policy Forever and Would Forget Past Troubles. By Albert J. Adams. My attention has been called to the fact that my name has been extensively coupled with the recent policy raids in Brooklyn. I wish to ask your indulgence in denying the truth of such allegations. Let me say once and for all time, I am absolutely and forever out of politics, gambling policy and all kinds of lotteries.
  • New York Times; December 18, 1901; Policy Shop Protection; Frank Moss Believes Each Paid $20 a Month to the Police. Evidence Found in Papers Taken in Recent Raid. Believed to be in Albert J. Adams's Handwriting. Twenty dollars per month per policy shop is believed by ex-Police Commissioner Frank Moss to be the price paid the police for protection by the "Policy King," according to a statement made by him yesterday at the headquarters of the Society for the Prevention of Crime.
  • New York Times; October 8, 1905; "Al" Adams Has Quit. Says He's Dropped Policy Forever and Would Forget Past Troubles. By Albert J. Adams. My attention has been called to the fact that my name has been extensively coupled with the recent policy raids in Brooklyn. I wish to ask your indulgence in denying the truth of such allegations. Let me say once and for all time, I am absolutely and forever out of politics, gambling policy and all kinds of lotteries.
  • New York Times; October 2, 1906, Tuesday; "Al" Adams a Suicide, Following Misfortunes; Broken By Ill-health and Money Losses, He Shoots Himself. Sage & Co. Sank $2,000,000. He Also Felt Deeply The Disgrace Of Prison Sentence. Great Fortune Made In Policy Swindle.
  • New York Times; October 5, 1906, Friday; A. J. Adams's Funeral; Tribute Paid by the Rector to the Suicide as a Soldier.
  • New York Times; November 28, 1906, Wednesday; Police Graft Letters Found In Jerome Raid; They Name A Police Inspector Who Got Hush Money. Hidden In The Allen's Desk. Jerome Now Fortified for a Big Crusade Against Gamblers and Police Grafters. Not since the office of "Al" Adams was entered and the evidence obtained which later sent the policy king to Sing Sing has such an attack been made upon a gambler as was the raid yesterday on The Allen's home, at 17 West Eighth Street.