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        Reno Gazette-Journal: Chess Academy grooms future area's champions         


Written by
Lenita Powers
lpowers@rgj.com

Reno Chess Academy

For more information, contact the academy by emailing go@renochessacademy.info or nathaniel garingo@chess.com, or calling 775-378-8622.

Nathaniel "Nate" Garingo, Nevada's reigning state chess champion, wants to help the Silver State produce a future world champion of the game.

Toward that end, Garingo's opening gambit was to create the Reno Chess Academy.

"The purpose of the Reno Chess Academy is to teach kids and, eventually, to find out who is the best in Northern Nevada," said Garingo, a 26-year-old sushi chef.

"If they go on to represent the state in the national youth championship, they would have a chance to represent the United States in the World Youth Chess Championship," he said.

Last year, it was Steven Zierk, a 17-year-old from Los Gatos, Calif., who won the 2010 World Youth Chess Championship.

The Reno Chess Academy, which Garingo registered in January as a nonprofit corporation with the Secretary of State's Office, will offer chess lessons to people of all ages, but its focus will be on younger players.

"It's very important because it helps young minds develop skills -- analytical thinking, problem-solving and self-discipline," Garingo said.

The chess academy charges $40 for one-and-a-half hours of private tutoring. Its members also will offer eight-week, after-school courses for groups of students for $120.

To promote an interest in chess, Garingo said the academy wants to put on chess exhibitions at schools in Washoe and nearby counties.

He also is working with faculty at Reno's Davidson Academy for extremely gifted students to hold chess workshops.

"We are trying to distract kids from playing computer games and get them to play chess instead because a lot of universities in the United States offer scholarships to chess players," Garingo said. "The University of Texas, Dallas, offers a full scholarship."

He said the academy will put on semi-annual and annual tournaments.

By charging students for chess lessons and accepting outside donations, Garingo plans to establish a scholarship fund through a local bank.

He said the money will provide students with college scholarships based on both their chess skills and academic achievements.

"This program is designed to make better young Nevadans with a bright future, and we believe geniuses are not born, but they are made," he said.[click here]


Does the next Robert James “Bobby” Fischer attend the Davidson Academy?           

The Davidson Academy of University of Nevada, Reno, decided to work with the Reno Chess Academy to develop and search for the most talented kids around Northern Nevada. Mr. Scooby Meredeth Students Activities Coordinator believes that Chess is the best way to stimulate and challenge young geniuses minds while allowing them to enjoy themselves at the same time.

Classes will be held at the Davidson Academy from 3:30pm to 5:00pm Thursdays on the following dates together with the curriculum below:

First Week March 24, 2011

Introduction to Chess

Students will learn about chess history, notable players, chess as a profession, notations, chess clocks, how chess affects one's individual lifestyle, and chess as a body of science.


Second Week March 28, 2011

Notations

Chess Notations serve as language in the chess world, players communicate, share ideas, and even play blindfolded chess using chess notations. It's imperative for a player to learn how to write, read, and communicate using chess notations. This section teaches students how to read, write, and communicate using the chess language known as notations.


Third Week April 7, 2011

Chess clock

Timers or chess clocks are one of the most important factors in chess. They measure accuracy, efficiency, and consistency of chess players based on the given time period. In this part of the curriculum students will learn hands on while exploring the chess clock’s mechanics, which includes: blitz, bullets, rapid, and standard G30/90 and G40/90.


Fourth Week April 14, 2011

The black pieces and the white pieces

Players tend to favor the white pieces simply because white moves first! This topic explains and tackles the mystery of the color of chess pieces and also points out why a player shouldn’t avoid playing black.


Fifth Week April 21, 2011

Chess Fundamental Theories and Principles

We will cover chess theories and principles because they are the body of scientific chess and also serve as the backbone of proper chess. In chess history around the year 1900 GM Jose Raul Capablanca dominated the world of chess by using his skill to understand the middle and endgame by creating his own principles and theories with great result.


Sixth Week April 28, 2011

Repertoire

Repertoire has a very important role in chess, it bonds everything from the chess clocks, strategy of play, theories, comfort zone, territorial advantage, and even a player’s confidence. In high-level tournaments repertoire is a critical weapons because one’s masterful performance depends upon repertoire, just like a military top secret, your repertoire has to remain secret from everyone.

Please contact Scooby (smeredith@davidsonacademy.unr.edu) no later than Monday, March 21st if you are interested. 

Cute Kid Becomes Grandmaster

Three players made GM norms in this event: Daan Brandenburg and Robin van Kampen each completed their second norm, while Ukrainian prodigy Illya Nyzhnyk, who is now the youngest grandmaster in the world.


GM title at 14 years 3 months: Illya Nyzhnyk of Ukraine

Illya was born September 27, 1996 in Vinnytsia, Ukraine. He gained international attention when he won the B Group of the 2007 Moscow Open at the age of ten, with a nearly flawless score of 8.5/9 and a 2633 performance. In April 2008 Nyzhnyk won the Nabokov Memorial in Kiev, Ukraine, with 8½/11, and scored his first GM norm. In December 2009 he won the Schaakfestival Groningen iwith a 2741 performance. Now with a third GM norm under his belt he will receive the title from FIDE, making him the 11th youngest GM in history, and the youngest today.


Illya Nyzhnyk playing in the Boy's Under 10 at the European Youth Chess Championships in Herceg Novi, Serbia and Montenegro in September 2005. Here's a video showing the 10-year-old Illya in action.

 
Knee-high to a grasshopper and giving simuls: Illya Nyzhnyk


The twelve-year-old playing for “PVK Kievchess” at the Ukrainian Team Championship in 2009

Youngest grandmasters in history

No.
 Player
Nat.
years
months
days
year
 Sergey Karjakin
UKR
12
7
0
2002
 Parimarjan Negi
IND
13
3
22
2006
 Magnus Carlsen
NOR
13
3
27
2004
 Bu Xiangzhi
CHN
13
10
13
1999
 Richard Rapport
HUN
13
11
15
2010
 Teimour Radjabov
AZE
14
0
14
2001
 Ruslan Ponomaryov 
UKR
14
0
17
1997
 Wesley So
PHI
14
1
28
2007
 Etienne Bacrot
FRA
14
2
0
1997
10 
 Jorge Cori
PER
14
2
0
2009
11 
 Illya Nyzhnyk
UKR
14
3
2
2010
12 
 Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
FRA
14
4
0
2005
13 
 Peter Leko
HUN
14
4
22
1994
14 
 Hou Yifan
CHN
14
6
2
2008
15 
 Anish Giri
RUS
14
7
2
2009
16 
 Yuri Kuzubov
UKR
14
7
12
2004
17 
 Dariusz Swiercz
POL
14
7
29
2009
18
 Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son 
VIE
14
10
0
2004
19
 Ray Robson
USA
14
11
16
2009
20
 Fabiano Caruana
ITA
14
11
20
2007
21
 Koneru Humpy
IND
15
1
27
2002
22
 Hikaru Nakamura
USA
15
2
19
2003
23
 Pentala Harikrishna
IND
15
3
5
2001
24
 Judit Polgar
HUN
15
4
28
1991
25
 Alejandro Ramirez
CRI
15
5
14
2003
26
 Bobby Fischer
USA
15
6
1
1958

Source: ChessBase

Posted by Nate on November 1, 2010 at 11:53 PM
 
In my opinion,chess is an extreme science, a mystery that even Super Grandmasters can't solve. Every thing is just theory and there are no certain laws. For instance, is center control or development more important? The answer is? It all depends! Center control and development are just inputs given to solve the problem. YOU are the examiner, the judge and the solver.

Examination
 

As the examiner, you want to come up with the most rational understanding of the position. This separates the amateurs from the masters. The deeper your understanding, the better.

 

Basic things to consider while examining the position:

1.) Character of the position - You should ask yourself, “Is the position closed or open?” It's as easy as that. If your answer is incorrect, your analysis will be doomed for sure!

2.) Game pacing - This sometimes can be determined by looking at the character of the position. If the position is closed, the chances of a positional game are high and positional games mean slow pacing. On the other hand, if the position is open and sharp, you should think about wild and rapid movement of the pieces.

 

3.) Prioritizing pieces - It is very important for a chess player to know which piece is the best piece in any given position. For instance, in a closed position, a knight is more likely preferable. Knowing this will help you decide which pieces to exchange and which to keep on the board.

4.) Coordination - This is very essential for every aspiring chess player to improve his or her game to its potential. Imagine that chess pieces are real armies or elite forces like the SAS, Green Berets or Commandos. If you send them into battle without "briefing" or "coordination" from their commanding officer, they might inflict casualties on each other. You are the General of your pieces and your job is to put them in good harmony.

Judgment
 
- After learning the position by examining it, you must make decisions. You can't just sit in your chair and let your opponent beat you on time. Their have been players who couldn't make a decision because they were scared or mistrustful of their own brains. If you have that kind of indecision, you must stop that now! Otherwise, you cannot enjoy the real beauty of chess. Instead, you will probably suffer the misery of obsession and insomnia in which case, I would recommend you to play Monopoly instead of chess.

Things to consider when rendering judgments:

1.) Opponent's last move - Your opponent's move is often the best source of your plan, making your plan formation easier. Ask yourself, "Why did he play that?" Again, you must understand the real idea behind it or else you may find youself right where your opponent wants you. Actually this part just needs common sense. Your opponent is not your friend over the board. He is sitting in front of you to destroy you. If you could read his mind, you can thwart his plan. Always think about the idea of your opponent’s move.

2.) The first order of business is survival - By examining your position, you should know which of your pieces is most threatened. The saying, the closest threat is the most dangerous threat, applies to chess. You should be able to distinguish which threats are serious and you should know how to deal with them. If you think his threat is only a bluff or if your threat is stronger, then go!


Solution
 
Solving problems is the most stressful part of chess. It commonly happens when the opponent makes a surprising move or offers some material for the "initiative". This is known as "imbalance". Lots of study, pattern recognition, and experience can save your day, but your talent, intuition, and instinct are the most valuable!

One of the most brilliant examples of solving problems over the board happened between Vishwanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik in the 2008 World Championship, when Anand just needed a draw to win the match or else Kramnik would win. Anand played 1. e4!! which was a brilliant move at the right time and against the right person. I will tell you why. Kramnik played 1.... e5 2. Nf3 Nf6!? (punctuation mark is just for this topic). Anand knew that Kramnik's "pet line" was the Petroff Defense which is a notoriously drawish opening. Since Anand just needed a draw, this was perfect for him (That is why I put 1. e4!!) and Kramnik knew that playing the Petroff wouldn’t be a good idea for him.

Next posting will be my games against Bill Case and Daniil Fedunov.

Stay tuned! – Nate Garingo
Ċ
Ernest Hong,
Feb 14, 2011, 11:43 PM
Ċ
Ernest Hong,
Dec 4, 2010, 3:24 PM
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