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Teaching

As engineers and scientists, we learn about the world apply what we have learned to improve it.  My job as an educator is to guide students in such learning.  I foster thorough understanding of fundamental concepts students can use to solve real world problems.  Specifically, I offer students terminologies, methods, and learning resources and guide them as they satiate their own curiosities about fundamental scientific and engineering concepts.  My aspiration is always to guide each student to mastery of the relevant fundamentals.  I know mastery has been achieved when students can successfully apply these concepts to solving challenging problems.

Two of my teaching experiences stand out from the others:
    • The first year engineering course is intended to generally introduce first year students interested in engineering to the various disciplines of engineering, such as computer programming, forces, electrical circuits, mechanical gears, and the balance equation.  Students meet in lecture h all twice per week and in learning center once per week.  In learning center, students work in teams of five to complete two hands-on projects per semester.  The final learning center project is a team-directed design.  Teams demonstrate a scientific property of choice using a model that they design and build themselves.
I was a learning center instructor for this course, responsible for leading learning center sections, helping students troubleshoot their designs, teaching about effective technical communication, and grading technical reports and presentations.  Additionally, I helped create exams and engineering demonstrations for the lecture part of the course.
  • Graduate student instructor for an undergraduate/graduate level elective course in Computational Chemistry (Unive rsity of Notre Dame, Fall 2007)
    • This course was intended to teach students how to use quantum chemical and classical methods to simulate thermody n amics an d k inetics of chemical processes.  Students met in a small lecture (~20 students) for three hours a week.  Two classes were held in the comput er lab to give hands-on instruction to computational methods.  Course evaluations consisted of four computational homework sets and an individual research investigation.
My responsibilities for this course were intermittent between those of a teaching assistant and a course instructor.  I was responsible for grading homeworks and answering ques tions as well as developing the list of course topics and giving class and lab lectures.

Click here to view: Teaching philosophy, Future Goals





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Rachel Getman,
Aug 31, 2010, 2:00 PM
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Rachel Getman,
Aug 31, 2010, 2:00 PM
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