RACE, RACISM & THE ENVIRONMENT

    CANCELED EVENT:

 March 29th, 2011. 12:30 – 2:30pm HNES140

Tourism, International Development and the Intersections of Race, Class and Gender







About The Seminar Series:
   2010-2011 Academic Year 
HNES 140

Organized by Accessibility Community Equity Committee (ACE), a group of racialized students, alumni, community workers and academics from the Masters in Environmental Studies program at York University, this seminar series brings together activists, academics, community workers, students and researchers to explore race, racism and the environment.  It addresses these issues across a range of sites such as education, tourism, food, migration and sexual health.   The goal of the series is to confront the contemporary issues that racialized communities face in relation to different aspects of natural, social and organizational environments. This seminar series encompasses a wealth of topics for rich discussions that draw from pedagogies such as anti-oppression, anti-racism, afro-centrism and eco-feminism.



September 28th, 2010. 12:30 – 2:30pm HNES 140

Racism in Environmentalism Part 1: Racialization, Invisibility and Alienation in Rural Ontario: Envisioning Justice for Migrant Farm Workers

 October 26th, 2010. 12:30-2:30 pm

Nomanzland Performace

 November 29-December 02, 2010. 12:30 – 2:30pm HNES 140

Sexual Health Education and HIV/AIDS Prevention in Racialized Communities

 January 25th, 2011. 12:30-2:30pm HNES140

Racism in Environmentalism Part 2

 February 22nd, 2011. 12:30 – 2:30pm HNES140

Race, Environmentalism and Education: Afro-centrism, Anti-racist Praxis and Urban Education

 March 29th, 2011. 12:30 – 2:30pm HNES140

Tourism, International Development and the Intersections of Race, Class and Gender



OBJECTIVES:

The goal of the series is to confront the contemporary issues that racialized communities face in relation to different aspects of natural, social and organizational environments in a contemporary, western context. This seminar series encompasses a wealth of topics for rich discussions that draw from pedagogies such as anti-oppression, anti-racism, afro-centrism and eco-feminism. The events, lectures and panels are organized under varying themes, addressing a host of broad questions which include the following:

  1. How is space racialized locally and transnationally?
  2. Do laws and policy give rise to new forms of racism through their effects on mobility, migration, food production and distribution?
  3. How do race class and gender intersect in particular ways through transnational tourism?
  4. What are examples of effective educational interventions on sexual health and HIV prevention in racialized communities and how do these interventions both challenge and/or build on existing ideas of race, sex and the environment?
  5. How and why is the enviromental movement racialized?
  6. Why is the global environmental movement dominated and led by white bodies and white voices? What are the consequences of this?
  7. How are racialized communities mobilizing around environmental issues: e.g community gardens?


AN OVERVIEW OF THE ISSUES

 Canada’s racial hierarchy begins with the near extermination of its Indigenous peoples and the dispossession of their lands. The mythologies of a white settler society like Canada is based on the premise that white or European people were the principal developers of a land that was previously occupied by uncivilized, heathen inhabitants and as such is most entitled to place and space.  These mythologies create the basis of citizenship, allowing citizens to think of themselves as belonging to community and nation, ultimately defining who belong and do not belong. As Indigenous populations are consigned to a precivilized space, the existence of peoples of color have been relegated to Canada’s post-development period and just as easily erased from a history of European enterprising and thus, citizenship and belonging. Canada’s white settler history often negates the ways in which spaces are constituted to reproduce racial and social hierarchies, legitimized by unequal spacial and legal practices in order to maintain an ongoing white settler societal project.   

 In 21st century academia the effects of spacial and racial inequality endures against a facade of multicultural policies and legislative ‘equality’. The study of environmentalism and the Environmental movement itself is no exception. Environmental racism in Canada is often neglected in the mainstream environmental movement discourse, primarily because it is dominated by wealthy, predominantly white communities whose interests are protected by the state and who control the environmental movement’s neoliberal, capitalist agenda. First Nations, people of color, immigrants and low-income communities disproportionately bear environmental burdens and risks as a result of institutionalized racism, unresponsive, unaccountable government policies and lack of political and economic power and resources. The environmental movement in Canada however, continues to organize around “green” politics failing to critically examine issues of race and racism as it affects marginalized communities. Given Canada’s multicultural composition and its enduring history of colonialism and institutionalized racism, there is an urgent need for an evolution in the environmental movement; and evolution that will more closely examine environmentalism in relation to space, race and racism in Canada.

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