Download

Download instructions last updated November 2016.

[Note for Windows users:  With version 1.2.00 and above, I build the zip damon1 file on my Mac.  If you run into hassles trying to open the zip file, please let me know.  Thanks, Mark]

Updating Your Version of Damon
If you already have Python, Numpy, (assuming Python version 2.7) and an earlier version of Damon:
  1. Go to site-packages.  Find and open the site-packages directory within your version of Python.  You may have multiple Pythons on your system.  Make sure you're in the right one, the one you actually want to use when you open IDLE.  
    • Windows.  C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages
    • Mac Lion.  /Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/site-packages
    • Mac Lion Enthought distribution.  /Library/Frameworks/EPD64.framework/Versions/7.2/lib/python2.7/site-packages
    • Other versions of Windows, Mac, Linux.  Not sure.
  2. Delete Old damon.  Find the damon1 (or damon) directory inside site-packages ('.../site-packages/damon1') and delete it.  You may see the tarball or zip file of the previous version in site-packages.  You can keep it or not, as you wish. 
  3. Copy Latest Version to site-packages.  Download the Damon "tarball" or "zip" file appearing below.  A "tarball" (.tgz extension) is like a compressed zip file and should be downloaded if you are using a Mac or Linux system.  Download the zip file (.zip extension) if you are using Windows.  In your download folder, double-click to open it.  On Mac it just opens cleanly.  On Windows, using Winzip or the built-in zip utility, right-click and use the "Extract to here" option.  You should end up with a folder called damon1.  Copy the damon1 folder into the site-packages directory identified above.  The goal is to end up with an unzipped folder called damon1 in site-packages.  Inside damon you should see folders called test and doc and some python files, such as core.py.  Damon is now installed and ready to go.  Python will look in this location whenever it tries to import damon.  

Installing Python, Numpy, and Damon the First Time Using the Enthought or Anaconda Distributions
To use Damon, you first need to install Python and its numerical package Numpy.  The most hassle-free way to do this is by getting either Enthought's free Canopy-express distribution or Continuum Analytics Anaconda Distribution or one of the other numerical packages.  Besides simplifying installation of a lot of stuff, you get a treasure trove of Python tools for scientific computing, including iPython (a powerful interactive Python interpreter) and matplotlib (for publication-quality graphing).  The Anaconda distribution is what I now use.

If you go this route (which I recommend), you need to manually download and copy Damon into the site-packages folder of the Enthought or Anaconda directory, whichever you're using. You may have to hunt around for the site-packages directory, as it will be usually be several layers down, possibly in hidden directories.  In Windows, the Canopy address looks like this:  C:\Users\Mark Moulton\AppData\Local\Enthought\Canopy\User\Lib\site-packages.    On my Mac, the Anaconda address looks like this:  /Users/markhmoulton/anaconda/lib/python2.7/site-packages/.  If you don't have Canopy or Anaconda, you can also copy Damon into the regular Python site-packages directory, wherever that is.  Python will look for Damon in a variety of places, returning an ImportError exception when you type >>>  import damon1 in IDLE, if it can't find it .  Confusion sometimes arises when you have multiple versions of Python on your system and you open a version that does not contain Damon (or Numpy) in its site-packages directory.  The header of the IDLE window will tell you which version of Python you opened.

Once you have copied the Damon tar file (OS X or Linux) or zip file (Windows) into the appropriate site-packages directory, just extract it (see directions above).  You should end up with a folder called damon1 in site-packages.  

Working with Python
Now you just need to figure out how to open up and run Python.  There are several options here, depending on the distribution.  
  1. Canopy.  Canopy provides its own IDE, or Python working environment.  Just find the program and open it.  You can also go to the Start menu and search for and open IDLE, the regular Python shell.

  2. Anaconda.  This is a little more geeky.  In the Anaconda folder, look for a folder called bin (short for "binaries", which are programs that can be run from the command console).  In there you should see a binary called idle.  The address on my Mac is /Users/markhmoulton/anaconda/bin/idle.  If you click on this, a console window will pop up followed by the regular Python IDLE shell.  (Make an alias of the binary and copy it to your toolbar to save having to dig around whenever you want to open Python.)
So far, I have only described how to open IDLE, the IDE (Integrated Development Environment) that comes bundled with Python.  I happen to like IDLE, but there are other environments that are nicer in a lot of ways.  For doing interactive sessions (as opposed to writing programs) IPython and especially IPython Notebook are wonderful.  IPython is run from the console, IPython Notebook from your web browser.  IPython Notebook is visually appealing and keeps a nice written record of all your work, including charts and graphics.  You can even write articles with it.  For a more full-featured IDE, for heavy-duty programming, I recommend Spyderlib.  For a more light-weight guerrilla style of writing code, get a text editor like Sublime Text 2 and use it in conjunction with Python run from the console.  The way this works is that you open a console in one window and type python (or better, type ipython if you have it).  The Python >>> prompt will pop up and you can import Python packages and enter Python commands, just like IDLE.  In a separate window you have your text editor with the Python script you are working on.  You work on the script.  Then you go over to the console to run it.

Each of these approaches has its own learning curve, especially for newbies (like me).  I mention them so you know you're not stuck with IDLE and that there are other Python working environments out there.

Getting the Free Online Versions of Python and Numpy
If you opt not to download the Enthought or Anaconda distributions, the following steps are for installing the free stand-alone versions of Python and Numpy, plus Damon.  It looks like a lot, but it's actually pretty simple.  The versions in the links below should work, though they may not be the latest and greatest.
  1. Download Python.  Visit http://www.python.org/getit/releases/2.7.2/ .  Here are different installers for each operating system.  What follows are download links to the most common ones for Mac and Windows.  They worked for me.  Click on the links below and they will download Python to your Downloads folder.
  2. Install Python.  Open your Downloads folder and double-click the installer.  A wizard will lead the rest of the way.
  3. Check that Python works.
    • Windows (Vista).  In Start, click on All Programs, then Python 2.7, then IDLE (Python GUI).
    • Mac (Snow Leopard, Lion).  In Finder, click on Applications.  In the Python 2.7 folder, double-click on IDLE
    • A white Python shell should pop up with Python 2.7.2 and version information across the top, with a >>>  prompt at the bottom.  Success.
  4. Download Numpy.  Visit the Numpy and Scipy SourceForge site http://sourceforge.net/projects/numpy/files/NumPy/1.6.1/ .  This contains all the available versions for each operating system.  It's easy to pick the wrong one (I did, twice).  Here's what will work with the version of Python you just installed.
  5. Install Numpy.  Open your Downloads folder and double-click the installer.  A wizard will lead the rest of the way.
  6. Check that Numpy works.
    • Open IDLE.  (See Step 3)
    • Try to import Numpy.  At the prompt, type  >>>  import numpy 
    • A new >>>  prompt should appear without an error message.  Success.
  7. Download Damon.  Download the Damon "tarball" (e.g., damon1_x.xx.xx.tgz) or "zip" file (e.g., damon1_x.xx.xx.zipappearing below -- the "Current Version".  Download the tarball if you are on a Mac or Linux system.  Download the zip file if you are on Windows.  Damon doesn't have an installer yet, just this compressed folder of Damon scripts -- very low-tech and simple.
  8. Open Damon tarball.  In your Downloads folder, double click or otherwise open damon1_x.xx.xx.tgz.  
    • Windows.  Right-click and use the Extract to here option.  Hopefully, the damon1 folder will appear.  Otherwise, it may be nested in another folder.
    • Mac. Just double-clicking should create the damon1 folder normally.
    • Copy damon1.  Copy the damon1 folder in preparation for pasting.
  9. Go to site-packages.  Find and open the site-packages directory within your version of Python.  You may have multiple Pythons on your system.  Make sure you're in the right one, the one you actually use when you open IDLE.  
    • Windows.  C:\Python27\Lib\site-packages
    • Mac Lion.  /Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/site-packages
    • Mac Lion Enthought distribution.  /Library/Frameworks/EPD64.framework/Versions/7.2/lib/python2.7/site-packages
    • Other versions of Windows, Mac, Linux.  Not sure.
  10. Paste damon1 to site-packages.  Paste damon1 inside the site-packages folder.  You should also see the numpy folder in there.
  11. Check that damon1 works.
    • Open IDLE.  (See Step 3)
    • Try to import damon1.  At the prompt, type  >>>  import damon1 
    • A new >>>  prompt should appear without an error message.  Success.  You are good to go!
  12. Do the Tutorial.  You are ready to learn Damon.  Go straight to the tutorial and start typing.

SelectionFile type iconFile nameDescriptionSizeRevisionTimeUser
SelectionFile type iconFile nameDescriptionSizeRevisionTimeUser
ċ

Download
Skips from version 1.2.02 to 1.2.05 (others were private versions). Lots of changes -- standard errors, rescaling, irt_tools, etc.  5950k v. 2 Jun 8, 2017, 10:50 AM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
  6006k v. 2 Jun 8, 2017, 10:48 AM Mark Moulton
SelectionFile type iconFile nameDescriptionSizeRevisionTimeUser
ċ

Download
In tools.dif_stats() fixed DIF flag formula.  4101k v. 3 Aug 8, 2014, 4:57 PM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
  4268k v. 3 Aug 8, 2014, 4:57 PM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
Years of accumulated changes, extra IRT functionality, bug fixes, refinement of standard errors, focus on getting the equating process to work right. Also redid the unit testing framework (the comparison test outputs are why the package is so much bigger).  5009k v. 3 Mar 21, 2017, 4:24 AM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
Windows users. Let me know if this Mac produced zip file gives you trouble.  5111k v. 3 Mar 21, 2017, 4:24 AM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
Improved the estimation of standard errors, with lots of other changes.  5937k v. 3 Apr 5, 2017, 12:53 PM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
  6007k v. 3 Apr 5, 2017, 12:53 PM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
Fixed bug in equate() that hampered rescaling.  5942k v. 3 Jun 8, 2017, 10:46 AM Mark Moulton
ċ

Download
  5998k v. 3 Jun 8, 2017, 10:46 AM Mark Moulton