Optical Transmission of the Internet:

Lasers

Invisibilily is possible using frequencies of transmission that are just below or just above the human optical spectrum.

 

Privacy Advantages are temporary, however, due to the general tenacity of inspired human ingenuity

 

Free Space Optics (FSO) communications, also called Free Space Photonics (FSP) or Optical Wireless, refers to the transmission of modulated visible or infrared (IR) beams through the atmosphere to obtain optical communications. Like fiber, Free Space Optics (FSO) uses lasers to transmit data, but instead of enclosing the data stream in a glass fiber, it is transmitted through the air. Free Space Optics (FSO) works on the same basic principle as Infrared television remote controls, wireless keyboards or wireless Palm® devices.

In the deeper future, when humanity decides not to create all children just to kill them like it does now, the virtuebios will be ready to guide the collective human intention into an efficient immortalising system. Universal Intentioneering Systems will provide evolvably accurate feedback for the intention-perception-response-suggestion technology. Real time interneted graphs will show progress being made in all known sectors of human vulnerability. Participation will be mandatory and administered compassionately.
THIS IS A ROBERT RAY HEDGES IS TAKING OVER THE INTERNET PHENOMENON PRODUCTION
truth love clarity future immortality psychic
Window into the world of light emitting diode physics


Window into the world of led perfomance improvements plotted in time 1960-2000


Window into the world of satellite commumications options
Physical Immortality is the Darwin Point
Link to valuable groundwork relevant to Optical Communication courtesy of Steve J. Noll, WA6EJO
Internet Transmission Using

Optical Lasers and Telescopes

Internet Transmission via Optical Lasers and Telescopes

Lasers and Telescopes used for wifi, laser modulated wifi, internet transmitted by way of light modulation, optically coupled internet
Quote: "Similarly, a 125mW HeNe laser, together with a receiver constructed from a 12 inch telescope and Photo-Multiplier-Tube, has been used in a one waycontact over 110 miles."

http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/pdf/9009019.pdf

http://www.free-space-optics.org

How Free Space Optics (FSO) Works Free Space Optics (FSO) transmits invisible, eye-safe light beams from one "telescope" to another using low power infrared lasers in the teraHertz spectrum. The beams of light in Free Space Optics (FSO) systems are transmitted by laser light focused on highly sensitive photon detector receivers. These receivers are telescopic lenses able to collect the photon stream and transmit digital data containing a mix of Internet messages, video images, radio signals or computer files.Commercially available systems offer capacities in the range of 100 Mbps to 2.5 Gbps, and demonstration systems report data rates as high as 160 Gbps. Free Space Optics (FSO) communications, also called Free Space Photonics (FSP) or Optical Wireless, refers to the transmission of modulated visible or infrared (IR) beams through the atmosphere to obtain optical communications. Like fiber, Free Space Optics (FSO) uses lasers to transmit data, but instead of enclosing the data stream in a glass fiber, it is transmitted through the air. Free Space Optics (FSO) works on the same basic principle as Infrared television remote controls, wireless keyboards or wireless Palm® devices. History of Free Space Optics (FSO) The engineering maturity of Free Space Optics (FSO) is often underestimated, due to a misunderstanding of how long Free Space Optics (FSO) systems have been under development. Historically, Free Space Optics (FSO) or optical wireless communications was first demonstrated by Alexander Graham Bell in the late nineteenth century (prior to his demonstration of the telephone!). Bell’s Free Space Optics (FSO) experiment converted voice sounds into telephone signals and transmitted them between receivers through free air space along a beam of light for a distance of some 600 feet. Calling his experimental device the “photophone,” Bell considered this optical technology – and not the telephone – his preeminent invention because it did not require wires for transmission. Although Bell’s photophone never became a commercial reality, it demonstrated the basic principle of optical communications. Essentially all of the engineering of today’s Free Space Optics (FSO) or free space optical communications systems was done over the past 40 years or so, mostly for defense applications. By addressing the principal engineering challenges of Free Space Optics (FSO), this aerospace/defense activity established a strong foundation upon which today’s commercial laser-based Free Space Optics (FSO) systems are based. How Free Space Optics (FSO) Works Free Space Optics (FSO) transmits invisible, eye-safe light beams from one "telescope" to another using low power infrared lasers in the teraHertz spectrum. The beams of light in Free Space Optics (FSO) systems are transmitted by laser light focused on highly sensitive photon detector receivers. These receivers are telescopic lenses able to collect the photon stream and transmit digital data containing a mix of Internet messages, video images, radio signals or computer files.Commercially available systems offer capacities in the range of 100 Mbps to 2.5 Gbps, and demonstration systems report data rates as high as 160 Gbps. Free Space Optics (FSO) systems can function over distances of several kilometers. As long as there is a clear line of sight between the source and the destination, and enough transmitter power, Free Space Optics (FSO) communication is possible. FSO: Wireless, at the Speed of Light Unlike radio and microwave systems, Free Space Optics (FSO) is an optical technology and no spectrum licensing or frequency coordination with other users is required, interference from or to other systems or equipment is not a concern, and the point-to-point laser signal is extremely difficult to intercept, and therefore secure. Data rates comparable to optical fiber transmission can be carried by Free Space Optics (FSO) systems with very low error rates, while the extremely narrow laser beam widths ensure that there is almost no practical limit to the number of separate Free Space Optics (FSO) links that can be installed in a given location. How Free Space Optics (FSO) can help you FSO’s freedom from licensing and regulation translates into ease, speed and low cost of deployment. Since Free Space Optics (FSO) transceivers can transmit and receive through windows, it is possible to mount Free Space Optics (FSO) systems inside buildings, reducing the need to compete for roof space, simplifying wiring and cabling, and permitting Free Space Optics (FSO) equipment to operate in a very favorable environment. The only essential requirement for Free Space Optics (FSO) or optical wireless transmission is line of sight between the two ends of the link. For Metro Area Network (MAN) providers the last mile or even feet can be the most daunting. Free Space Optics (FSO) networks can close this gap and allow new customers access to high-speed MAN’s. Providers also can take advantage of the reduced risk of installing an Free Space Optics (FSO) network which can later be redeployed. The Market. Why FSO? Breaking the Bandwidth Bottleneck Why FSO? The global telecommunications network has seen massive expansion over the last few years. First came the tremendous growth of the optical fiber long-haul, wide-area network (WAN), followed by a more recent emphasis on metropolitan area networks (MANs). Meanwhile, local area networks (LANs) and gigabit ethernet ports are being deployed with a comparable growth rate. In order for this tremendous network capacity to be exploited, and for the users to be able to utilize the broad array of new services becoming available, network designers must provide a flexible and cost-effective means for the users to access the telecommunications network. Presently, however, most local loop network connections are limited to 1.5 Mbps (a T1 line). As a consequence, there is a strong need for a high-bandwidth bridge (the “last mile” or “first mile”) between the LANs and the MANs or WANs. A recent New York Times article reported that more than 100 million miles of optical fiber was laid around the world in the last two years, as carriers reacted to the Internet phenomenon and end users’ insatiable demand for bandwidth. The sheer scale of connecting whole communities, cities and regions to that fiber optic cable or “backbone” is something not many players understood well. Despite the huge investment in trenching and optical cable, most of the fiber remains unlit, 80 to 90% of office, commercial and industrial buildings are not connected to fiber, and transport prices are dropping dramatically. Free Space Optics (FSO) systems represent one of the most promising approaches for addressing the emerging broadband access market and its “last mile” bottleneck. Free Space Optics (FSO) systems offer many features, principal among them being low start-up and operational costs, rapid deployment, and high fiber-like bandwidths due to the optical nature of the technology. Broadband Bandwidth Alternatives Access technologies in general use today include telco-provisioned copper wire, wireless Internet access, broadband RF/microwave, coaxial cable and direct optical fiber connections (fiber to the building; fiber to the home). Telco/PTT telephone networks are still trapped in the old Time Division Multiplex (TDM) based network infrastructure that rations bandwidth to the customer in increments of 1.5 Mbps (T-1) or 2.024 Mbps (E-1). DSL penetration rates have been throttled by slow deployment and the pricing strategies of the PTTs. Cable modem access has had more success in residential markets, but suffers from security and capacity problems, and is generally conditional on the user subscribing to a package of cable TV channels. Wireless Internet access is still slow, and the tiny screen renders it of little appeal for web browsing. Broadband RF/microwave systems have severe limitations and are losing favor. The radio spectrum is a scarce and expensive licensed commodity, sold or leased to the highest bidder, or on a first-come first-served basis, and all too often, simply unavailable due to congestion. As building owners have realized the value of their roof space, the price of roof rights has risen sharply. Furthermore, radio equipment is not inexpensive, the maximum data rates achievable with RF systems are low compared to optical fiber, and communications channels are insecure and subject to interference from and to other systems (a major constraint on the use of radio systems). Free Space Optics (FSO) Advantages Free space optical (FSO) systems offers a flexible networking solution that delivers on the promise of broadband. Only free space optics or Free Space Optics (FSO) provides the essential combination of qualities required to bring the traffic to the optical fiber backbone – virtually unlimited bandwidth, low cost, ease and speed of deployment. Freedom from licensing and regulation translates into ease, speed and low cost of deployment. Since Free Space Optics (FSO) optical wireless transceivers can transmit and receive through windows, it is possible to mount Free Space Optics (FSO) systems inside buildings, reducing the need to compete for roof space, simplifying wiring and cabling, and permitting the equipment to operate in a very favorable environment. The only essential for Free Space Optics (FSO) is line of sight between the two ends of the link. Free Space Optics (FSO) Security The common perception of wireless is that it offers less security than wireline connections. In fact, Free Space Optics (FSO) is far more secure than RF or other wireless-based transmission technologies for several reasons: Free Space Optics (FSO) laser beams cannot be detected with spectrum analyzers or RF meters Free Space Optics (FSO) laser transmissions are optical and travel along a line of sight path that cannot be intercepted easily. It requires a matching Free Space Optics (FSO) transceiver carefully aligned to complete the transmission. Interception is very difficult and extremely unlikely The laser beams generated by Free Space Optics (FSO) systems are narrow and invisible, making them harder to find and even harder to intercept and crack Data can be transmitted over an encrypted connection adding to the degree of security available in Free Space Optics (FSO) network transmissions. Free Space Optics (FSO) Challenges The advantages of free space optical wireless or Free Space Optics (FSO) do not come without some cost. When light is transmitted through optical fiber, transmission integrity is quite predictable – barring unforseen events such as backhoes or animal interference. When light is transmitted through the air, as with Free Space Optics (FSO) optical wireless systems, it must contend with a a complex and not always quantifiable subject - the atmosphere. Fog and Free Space Optics (FSO) Fog substantially attenuates visible radiation, and it has a similar affect on the near-infrared wavelengths that are employed in Free Space Optics (FSO) systems. Note that the effect of fog on Free Space Optics (FSO) optical wireless radiation is entirely analogous to the attenuation – and fades – suffered by RF wireless systems due to rainfall. Similar to the case of rain attenuation with RF wireless, fog attenuation is not a “show-stopper” for Free Space Optics (FSO) optical wireless, because the optical link can be engineered such that, for a large fraction of the time, an acceptable power will be received even in the presence of heavy fog. Free Space Optics (FSO) optical wireless-based communication systems can be enhanced to yield even greater availabilities. Physical Obstructions and Free Space Optics (FSO) Free Space Optics (FSO) products which have widely spaced redundant transmitters and large receive optics will all but eliminate interference concerns from objects such as birds. On a typical day, an object covering 98% of the receive aperture and all but 1 transmitter; will not cause an Free Space Optics (FSO) link to drop out. Thus birds are unlikely to have any impact on Free Space Optics (FSO) transmission. Free Space Optics (FSO) Pointing Stability – Building Sway, Tower Movement Fixed pointed Free Space Optics (FSO) systems are designed to be capable of handling the vast majority of movement found in deployments on buildings. The combination of effective beam divergence and a well matched receive Field-of-View (FOV) provide for an extremely robust fixed pointed Free Space Optics (FSO) system suitable for most deployments. Fixed-pointed Free Space Optics (FSO) systems are generally preferred over actively-tracked Free Space Optics (FSO) systems due to their lower cost. Scintillation and Free Space Optics (FSO) Performance of many Free Space Optics (FSO) optical wireless systems is adversely affected by scintillation on bright sunny days; the effects of which are typically reflected in BER statistics. Some optical wireless products have a unique combination of large aperture receiver, widely spaced transmitters, finely tuned receive filtering, and automatic gain control characteristics. In addition, certain optical wireless systems also apply a clock recovery phase-lock-loop time constant that all but eliminate the affects of atmospheric scintillation and jitter transference. Solar Interference and Free Space Optics (FSO) Solar interference in Free Space Optics (FSO) free space optical systems operating at 1550 nm can be combatted in two ways. The first is a long-pass optical filter window used to block all optical wavelengths below 850 nm from entering the system; the second is an optical narrowband filter proceeding the receive detector used to filter all but the wavelength actually used for intersystem communications. To handle off-axis solar energy, two spatial filters have been implemented in SONAbeam systems, allowing them to operate unaffected by solar interference that is more than 1.5 degrees off-axis. Free Space Optics (FSO) Reliability Employing an adaptive laser power (Adaptive Power Control or APC) scheme to dynamically adjust the laser power in response to weather conditions will improve the reliability of Free Space Optics (FSO) optical wireless systems. In clear weather the transmit power is greatly reduced, enhancing the laser lifetime by operating the laser at very low-stress conditions. In severe weather, the laser power is increased as needed to maintain the optical link - then decreased again as the weather clears. A TEC controller that maintains the temperature of the laser transmitter diodes in the optimum region will maximize reliability and lifetime, consistent with power output allowing the FSO optical wireless system to operate more efficiently and reliably at higher power levels. SONAbeam™ systems are designed, engineered and tested to ensure exceptional reliability. Building on their extensive experience in laser communications systems for military and space applications, our design engineers have ensured that critical sub-systems are manufactured using high-reliability components. Component reliability is further ensured by rigorous vendor qualification and incoming inspection procedures. Our equipment reliability analysis is performed using the stringent Bellcore/Telcordia guidelines applicable to carrier equipment. This is further backed up by exhaustive qualification testing in our in-house test facilities, where subsystems are severely stressed and operational performance is validated at extremes ranging from -50°C to 75°C. The combination of active laser cooling, high-reliability components, sealed housings and rugged mechanical design enables us to offer carriers superior products with outstanding communications performance and a rated service life of 15 years. Built for Dependability and Longevity Depending on their bandwidth and operating range, SONAbeam™ systems are designed with two-, four- or eight-fold redundancy of lasers, laser drivers, laser coolers and cooler controllers. SONAbeam's™ environmentally sealed cast-aluminum exterior housings, unique in the market, are impervious to water, sun and other environmental hazards. fSONA's rugged transceiver mounting structures maintain pointing accuracy through Class 1 hurricanes of 120 km/hr, and survive Class 2 hurricanes of 160 km/hr. Unrivaled Link Availability: From the Arctic to the Sahara SONAbeam's™ higher-powered, redundant laser transmitters provide the best link availability in the business. Link availability refers to amount time a link is useable in specific weather encountered in various climates. Availability is typically quoted in nines. For example, 99.9%, or three-nines (3-9's) availability, means, on average, the link is expected to not be available 0.1% of the time, or an average of 43 minutes per month. Four-nines (4-9's) availability translates into only four minutes per month of down time and five-nines averages just 30 seconds of downtime per month. The distance over which a successful transmission can take place depends upon the design of the system, the weather in a given microclimate, the distance between the transceivers and the desired availability. The assessment of these variables leads to a "Link Budget" for each deployment. The Link Budget refers to the amount of output power necessary for "clear air" transmission plus the amount of extra power necessary to overcome inclement weather such as rain, snow, or scintillation as well as severe weather such as fog. The outcome of the Link Budget analysis will be unique to each deployment and dependent on the microclimate for that area. With more weather-penetrating power than competing products, SONAbeam™ is capable of providing fiber-like availability of up to 99.999%. Its high-powered laser transmitters are able to penetrate heavy rain, snow and fog more effectively and consistently than any other available FSO technology. In areas subject to extreme weather conditions, longer-range SONAbeam™ systems, deployed across a shorter distance, provide carrier-grade availability figures. Locations having frequent and heavy fog will have shorter allowable links for a given availability, whereas, relatively fog-free sites might be able to accommodate link lengths of several kilometers, using identical optical wireless equipment. fSONA's global network of service partners will conduct a thorough assessment of your installation climate and recommend an appropriate SONAbeam™ solution that delivers the availability your network requires. People fSONA's Engineering and Advanced Development staff includes many of the world's leading laser communications professionals. Our design team's extensive experience in military and space communications systems and hardware is evident in the highly-innovative SONAbeam™ product family. Eye-Safety and Increased Power Margin Most FSO systems on the market today use lasers in the near-visible infrared region around 800 nm. Laser "energy" at these wavelengths passes through the human cornea and lens, and is concentrated by a factor of 100,000 times when it is focused on the retina. If the power level is too high, permanent eye damage can be caused before the victim is aware of the hazard. As a result, 800 nm systems generally have low power transmitters, and correspondingly low fog penetration margins. fSONA's systems use infrared lasers operating in the 1550 nm region. At these wavelengths, the laser energy is absorbed by the cornea and lens, and does not focus onto the retina. As a result, the allowable eye-safe laser power is up to fifty times higher than at 800 nm. This ability to use fifty times more power allows fSONA's systems to operate over longer distances and/or through heavier fog attenuation, and to support higher data rates. fSONA's systems are completely "eye-safe", even directly in front of the laser transmitter windows. Leveraging the Fiber Optics Infrastructure Every year, the fiber optics industry invests billions of dollars developing new components and subsystems operating in the 1550 nm region. The ability to exploit the resulting vast array of competitively-priced components gives fSONA numerous advantages over competitors dependent on 800 nm lasers, and ensures that the capabilities of our 1550 nm-based optical wireless systems will always be able to grow along with the fiber-based networks. 1550 nm diode lasers that can operate at 2.5 Gbps are already widely available, with devices capable of 10 Gbps operation also beginning to appear. In contrast, the highest data rate possible with commercial 785 nm diode lasers is about 622 Mbps. Moreover, the wide availability of WDM (wavelength-division multiplexing) components for 1550 nm systems opens up a straightforward approach for scaling fSONA's products to higher data rates. Carrier-Class Reliability and Quality By incorporating advanced design features and proprietary technologies, we have developed a family of FSO products uniquely well-suited to the highly demanding carrier market. Our equipment reliability analysis is performed using the stringent Bellcore/Telcordia guidelines applicable to carrier equipment. This is further backed up by exhaustive testing in our in-house test facilities, where subsystems are severely stressed and operational performance is validated at extremes ranging from -50°C to 75°C. The combination of active laser cooling, high-reliability components, sealed housings and rugged mechanical design enables us to offer carriers superior products with outstanding communications performance and a rated service life of 15 years. Carrier-Class Availability The SONAbeam™ product family is engineered to meet carrier and user requirements for link availabilities of up to 99.999% over link ranges from 50 m to 4000 m. We are collecting and analyzing weather data and link performance for SONAbeam™ installations around the globe, in order to provide carriers and operators with the guidance and design tools needed to design and deploy metropolitan data networks and cellular/PCS backhaul with FSO links. For less critical applications that can tolerate occasional (rare) severe-weather outages, systems can be deployed at longer ranges, or lower-cost products can be used. Manufacturing The SONAbeam™ products are designed for volume manufacturing. fSONA's factory can produce 20 links per day with a single shift at 50% capacity. Production can be scaled easily to meet increasing demand. In-house production, strict manufacturing discipline and rigorous component vendor qualification ensure that the highest quality standards will be met and maintained. Key SONAbeam Differentiators Cost competitive, carrier-class products suitable for high-performance, high-reliability worldwide deployment. A modular design philosophy that provides cost effective solutions. First-to-market, high performance, patented 1550 nm transceiver system provides the best cost per bit in the industry. World-class active beam steering capabilities integrated with existing product architectures compensate for building motion and provide both longer range performance and higher bandwidth. Protocol-independent interfaces for both enterprise and carrier class service providers (SONET/SDH, IP, ATM, IEEE 802.34, and 802.3Z, FC).