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1: The Basic STRUIX Multiprocessor Stack

This simple assembly is designed to get you started with using the TWI (I2C) buss to allow multiple STRUIX CPU's to operate together.  You don't need much.

Download the example code.  UNZip and drop the STRUIX_Examples folder into the Arduino IDE examples folder.  Follow the instructions below and you'll be on your way experimenting with multiprocessor computing the STRUIX way.

What you need:

Two (2) or Three (3) STRUIX CPU's
 
 STRUIX ProtoPad One
 
 Two (2) 2.2k 1/4W resistors
 
 3.3V FTDI Basic USB Serial Adapter  (Arduino Programmer)
 
Misc. hardware:
12mm x M3 metal & plastic standoffs
M3 machine screws
 
 

The Example Program Library


 

How to do it:

 Install the resistors on the ProtoPad to tie the SCL & SDA lines to the positive (+) buss line.  This terminates the TWI (I2C) buss.
 
 
On the ProtoPad, install a pair of metal standoffs on the power buss and the TWI buss.  Use a plastic standoff as the third leg to support the stack.
 
 
Mount the first CPU in the stack.

Use metal standoffs to continue the power and TWI busses and a plastic standoff to continue the third leg.

Finally use the Arduino IDE, upload the example program STRUIX_EXAMPLE_SLAVE_2

 
 
 
 
 Mount the next CPU in the stack.

If this is the last CPU in the stack, skip to the last step to see how to finish up.

Otherwise:

Use metal standoffs to continue the power and TWI buses and a plastic standoff to continue the third leg.

Use the Arduino IDE, upload the example program STRUIX_EXAMPLE_SLAVE_1
 
 
 
 
Mount the last CPU in the stack.

Use M3 machine screws to terminate all the buses and legs.

Finally use the Arduino IDE, upload the example program STRUIX_EXAMPLE_MASTER
 
 
 
 

Notes:

After loading the STRUIX_EXAMPLE_MASTER program, open the serial monitor window.  Make sure the communication rate is set to 57600.  The program will display simple messages about which slave boards in the stack that the master is talking to.

This method of programming the stack makes development and debugging of new multiprocessor difficult because the stack must be disassembled to reveal the programming connector of the CPU.  Using XBEEs to wirelessly program each board in the stack makes life much easier.  See the project Adding an XBEE for details.

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