Launch Text

 

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 10:45:11 EST
Flight in review. The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University student rocket was successfully launch at 6:15 (EDT), March 22, from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. Preliminary data show that it looks like both the 1st and 2nd stages of the Icarus rocket performed nominally. We did have a problem in tracking the second stage so we do not have direct data on the apogee achieved. However, it is believed that an apogee may be determined from first stage tracking, payload data, optical data, and vehicle performance data. As soon as this is determined, more information will be posted at this site.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:32:27 EST
6:30 a.m. Good launch at 6:15 a.m. Launch team is reviewing data to determine flight performance. Post mission brief at 8:30 a.m. Flight results will be posted following the meeting.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:15:01 EST
6:15 a.m. Launch

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:14:12 EST
6:14 T-1 minuute and counting

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:12:00 EST
6:11 a.m. T-2 minute and counting

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:11:06 EST
6:10 a.m. New launch target time is 6:13 a.m.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:09:17 EST
6:08 a.m. T-2 minutes and holding. Hold is expected to be 5 to 8 minutes. Looking at winds. Surface winds acceptable. Looking at upper level winds.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:05:07 EST
6:05 a.m. T-5 minutes and counting

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 06:02:02 EST
6:03 a.m. T-7 minutes and counting. Targeting a 6:10 a.m. launch.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 05:50:00 EST
5:50 a.m. T-20 minutes and counting. The clock is counting down to T-10 minutes and then hold.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 05:47:59 EST
5:45 a.m. T-20 minutes and holding. The range just completed the launch of 2 test rockets to check out the radar tracking systems.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 05:36:32 EST
5:35 a.m. T-20 minutes and holding. The range is watching 2 weather issues. The cloud ceiling is at about 5,000 feet, which is the required lower limit. Also, the upper winds are exceeding the required limits.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 05:15:05 EST
At 5:15 a.m., T-20 minutes and holding. The check of the payload with the rocket in the launch position has been completed. The flight sequence for this mission: The first stage will burnout at 6.5 seconds after ignition. At that point the rocket is projected to be at about 6,661 feet altitude. The 2nd stage will ignite at 14.5 seconds after launch with burnout at 21.3 seconds. Peak altitude, or apogee, is projected at the 2 minute mark in flight. The first stage with the payload will impact in the Atlantic Ocean about 4 minutes after liftoff. No recovery of the payload is planned.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 05:02:37 EST
At 5 a.m., T-20 minutes and holding. The window has opened for this morning's launch attempt. The 16'foot solid-fueled Icarus rocket is in the vertical position. Icarus is a 2-stage rocket. The first stage booster is 6 inches diameter and the second stage is 4.5 inches diameter.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 04:51:56 EST
At 4: 50 a.m. T-20 minutes and holding. Final arming has been completed and the launcher has been elevated to the nominal settings. The surveillance aircraft is now flying off the Wallops Island coast looking for any boats that may be downrange under the projected flight path of the rocket.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 04:42:34 EST
The last report should have read at 4:40 a.m., T-20 minutes and holding.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 04:41:36 EST
At 4:30 a.m., T-20 minutes and holding. The launch team is in the final arming process. When completed the rocket will be cleared to elevate to the launch position. Commenting on this mission, “The Embry-Riddle student designed rocket is the most complex student project we have supported to date,” said Phil Eberspeaker, chief of NASA’s Sounding Rockets Program Office. “NASA subjects these student rockets to the same scrutiny as a NASA sounding rocket to ensure the flight can be conducted in a safe manner.” “The Embry-Riddle students have shown a lot of professionalism in the development of their student rocket. That professionalism, mixed with 80% rocket science and a little bit of luck, should lead to a safe and successful flight,” Eberspeaker said. The Embry Riddle project is one several university student design activities being supported by the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. These projects develop critical skills and capabilities needed to support science research and the Vision for Space Exploration.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 04:15:06 EST
At 4:15 a.m. Theclock is at T-45 minutes and counting. Horizontal checks have been completed. The weather at the launch site is 47 degrees with 3 mph winds out of the south west. We do have cloudy skies, which may be an issue. While the window opens at 5 a.m., the launch team prefers to launch at first sun light to provide optical coverage. Sun rise this morning is at 7:03.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 03:59:50 EST
T-1 hour and counting. Horizontal checks are in progress. Icarus is projected to reach an altitude of 40 miles. If all performs nominally, the 16-foot tall rocket will set an altitude record for a university built vehicle. The 15-pound payload on the rocket contains accelerometers, spin sensors and pressure sensors. In addition, the students will use global positioning satellite (GPS) systems to determine the location of the rocket during flight. Project Icarus was founded in the fall of 2003 by the Embry- Riddle Future Space Explorers’ and Developers’ Society. Icarus is the society’s flagship vehicle. The purpose of the mission is to combine classroom knowledge with hands-on experience in rocketry and engineering.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-22 at 03:44:33 EST
At 3:45 a.m., Thursday, March 22: We are now at T-1 hour and 15 minutes and counting towards the opening of the launch window for the Icarus rocket. Initial arming of the 1st and 2nd stage motors has been completed. Launch crews are now in the process of removing the horizontal shelter from the launch pad. Shortly the launch team will begin checking out the rocket's payload with the rocket in the horizontal position on the pad.

Posted by RCC on 2007-03-21 at 12:39:44 EST
A rocket developed by students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is scheduled for launch between 5 and 8 a.m. (EDT), Thursday, March 22, from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The 16-foot tall rocket, dubbed Icarus, is projected to fly to about about 40 miles altitude. Text updates of the mission status will begin at 4 a.m. on launch day. Video will not be provided.