LETTERS

The antique correspondences that started this whole project

As mentioned in the About The Website portion of this site, I did not buy all of these letters all at once.  We purchased them over a series of visits to the Antique Emporium in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.  I am hoping to add more to my collection.  If you know of the existence of any more Pringle or Simmons papers, please contact me.  I would be interested in either purchasing or, with your permission, borrowing them to scan and transcribe them so that I might have a more comprehensive portrait of the family.

Here is a link to a document that includes transcriptions of all of the letters, in case you are interested in printing them out and reading them at your leisure.  (Note: Using a size twelve Times New Roman font, the document is 50 pages long, so make sure you have enough paper in your printer!)

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From Benjamin Pringle to his son George Pringle.  13 August 1855.  "Unless I am entirely mistaken in my appreciation of your talents, you have capacity sufficient to become a distinguished and eminent lawyer..."

From Benjamin Pringle to his son George Pringle.  20 January 1864.  "If you qualify yourself for a high position and your health is spared, you may rest assured that your services will be in requisition and your mind appreciated."

From George Pringle to his daughter Nellie Pringle.  2 September 1873.  "Your first letter to papa was very nice for one who never wrote before.  If you try you will soon write a good letter."

From Frances Ellison Pringle to her daughter Nellie Pringle.  20 July 18??.  "I went in to Mrs. Clagett's this morning  she has lost three of her canaries & only three left.  They flew out of her bedroom window this morning. - "

From Frances Ellison Pringle to her daughter Nellie Pringle.  7 July 1875.  "The chickens are still running at large & I should not be at all surprised if Mr. Grosvenor got pretty mad if he gets home & finds them out."

From Edith Wheaton to her friend Frank Simmons.  26 December 18??.  "I thought it was from Miss Frances Simmons.  Then I decided that it was a man's hand.  I hope I have made no mistake."

From Bess ? to her friend Nellie Pringle.  19 March 1882.  "I am making me a white skirt two of the ruffles go all round the skirt and five up the back.  Mary W - had one like it and I took a fancy to it so am making one."

From Mrs. Pratt to her friend Frank Simmons.  6 December 1884.  "Mrs. Pratt cordially invites you to a Reception at her Studio Dec 12th and 13th from 10 am to 12 & 2 to 4 pm."

From Frank Simmons to his fiancee Nellie Pringle.  15 January 1886.   "Yes my love forty eight hours seem quite long, but my sweetheart believe me you are not alone in this conclusion."

From Martha Delano, also known as "Cousin Mat", to her step-nephew Frank Simmons.  28 January 1886.  "I am glad you and Nellie are so happy in each other.  Tell her I am not so much her champion as I am yours.  I do so want you to do your duty by her, and I hope you only need a little reminding, to enable you to do it."

From Frank Simmons to his fiancee Nellie Pringle.  5 February 1886.  "Miss Tyne returned our photo accompanied by a very nice letter of congratulations and a  short synopsis of a love affair of her own.  She told me to burn the letter at once, but of course you must see it."

From Frank Simmons to his fiancee Nellie Pringle.  24 May 1886.  "I think I shall write Coz Harley a few lines humbly requesting his service as "Best man" at a certain morning wedding, about the middle of October -86 which wedding is yours and mine."

From Katherine Knowles to her friends Frank and Nellie Simmons.  7 March 1888.  "I hope you like housework better than I do.  I get most woefully sick of it - Why do people have to eat?  However I enjoy the eating as well as anybody, so I must not complain."

From George Davis to his acquaintance Frances Ellison Pringle Clagett.  27 June 1890.  "My daughters Bernie & Mary start this evening on Steamer St. Paul for St. Paul."

From Nellie Pringle Simmons to her husband Frank Simmons.  16 February 1893.  "I have never waked these two past nights from the time my head touched the pillow until the rising bell sounded in the morning But oh it is most  awfully forlorn after going to my room."

From Nellie Pringle Simmons to her husband Frank Simmons.  17 February 1893.  "After that we called at Mrs. Blocks and she gave us five o' clock tea in true English style.  I enjoyed it but suffered the consequences later in not being able to get to sleep."

From Nellie Pringle Simmons to her sons Francis and George Simmons.  23 February 1893.  "My dear Francis & Georgie - I got my postal written yesterday before it popped into my mind about this letter I was going to write you."

From Florence Simmons Lyon to her sister-in-law Nellie Pringle Simmons.  16 April 1893.   "Horace so often says he wishes Frank could see this country.  He is so sure he would like it.  It is surely a fine place to make money, and money invested in almost any way brings in large returns."

From Eliza Dougans to her friend Nellie Pringle Simmons.  20 August 1901.  "I hope that Frank has had a most successful crop & that prices are good.  We hear that everything is very high & do not know whether we shall be able to live thro the winter on anything but the remembrance of our European trip or not."

From Gerard Effinger to his sister-in-law Nellie Pringle Simmons.  22 November 1903.  "I haven't congratulated you yet, except through Grandma's letters, on your new & husky son.  Long may he live & happy may he be!!"

From Katherine Knowles to her friends Frank and Nellie Simmons.  12 January 1904.  "I was somewhat surprised at the advent of the new boy.  I sent you word of the birth and death of our little Dorothy, but as you did not mention it perhaps it did not reach you."

From James Thorne to his friends Frank and Nellie Simmons.  11 November 1904.  "It is with deep regret that I heard but lately (having been away) that you had lost your boy Francis.  I cannot tell you how grieved I am to hear of your affliction."

From Nellie Pringle Simmons to her sister-in-law Rose Simmons Garrison.  2 May 1909.  "You must not be discouraged at not having a porch for a time.  I remember we had been keeping house about three years before Frank put on our first little square porch..."

From Dr. C. Eugene Riggs to his patient's daughter Nellie Pringle Simmons.  18 November 1910.  "Your mother is about the same as when she first came to the hospital last year.  I think she has done as well as could be expected thus far."

From Caroline Pringle Thorne to her niece Nellie Pringle Simmons.  27 August 1911.  "This is I know a busy season but maybe you can spare a few minutes to read a note from me & a letter your grandfather wrote to your father Aug 13 1855 about 56 years ago."

From George Simmons to his father Frank Simmons.  4 January 1912.  "There is not much snow here yet, only several inches and some use wheels while others have sleighs."

From Frank Simmons to his wife Nellie Pringle Simmons.  3 December 1915.  "If you run short of money sell some pork or some wheat.  I don't know when I can get anything out of this Co."

From Frank Simmons to his daughter Mary Simmons.  3 December 1915.  "This is a perfect morning & therefore suitable for writing to you."

From Frank Simmons to his wife Nellie Pringle Simmons.  4 December 1915.  "Do you still love a poor old chap like me?  That's a comfort."

From Mary Simmons to her father Frank Simmons.  11 October 1916.  "I was going to be a little bit of a runt I guess but I surprised him by being a 'great big girl.'"

From Mary Simmons to her parents Frank and Nellie Simmons.  3 April 1917.  "Rec'd cookies, thank you they were all crumbs when they got to me.  Don't send me a cake because I am getting too fat to eat it."

From Mary Simmons to her parents Frank and Nellie Simmons.  16 April 1917.  "How are you coming with the car have you still got it? and how does it run?"

From Mary Simmons to her parents Frank and Nellie Simmons.  1 October 1917.  "They have a new 5 pass Ford with all the modern equipments it really is quite nice but it looks so stiff and buggified."

From Mary Simmons to her mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  3 November 1917.  "Just think isn't it awful that we have to put 3 cents on letters now.  Oh how I wish I had answered all my letters before that happened and then I might have saved a few cents anyway."

From Mary Simmons to her parents Frank and Nellie Simmons.  10 February 1918.  "He said it was my gallbladder and said he'd watch me, that it would rectify itself without an operation.  Well that scared me so that I have been getting rapidly better ever since and the pain is not nearly so bad now."

From Mary Simmons to her sister Ellen Simmons.  15 August 1918.  "I am learning to play the ukulele - I can play it too if I have the notes but I cannot play by ear or by heart as yet, but I'll show you when I get home."

From Marjorie Ohls to her friend Carroll Simmons.  5 September 1918.  "So, Carroll, if you value your hair, don't let Laddie chew the evidences of my good time."

From Mary Simmons to her parents Frank and Nellie Simmons.  24 September 1918.  "Well it has been just a week today since I had my tonsils out and it seems to me I'm having a worse time swallowing than I had several days after."

From Mary Simmons to her mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  18 December 1918.  "Why don't any of you people answer my letters?  I haven't heard from any of you for so long I'm beginning to think you've disappeared off the face of the earth."

From Mary Simmons to her mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  7 February 1919.  "Well this is three days after the dance and I still feel rather as tho I had been to a dance."

From Mary Simmons to her mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  3 March 1919.  "When am I going to get a spring hat?  I'll wait until just before Easter and they'll be having sales, just before, altho it is over a month."

From Mary Simmons to her mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  9 May 1919.  "I'm absolutely destitute in regard to underwear..."

From Birdie Timberlake to her friend Lucia Simmons.  22 October 1919.  "To tell the truth, I think a little extra excitement caused by people you know will not hurt you a bit.  Just be food for thought sort of."

From Birdie Timberlake to her friend's mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  22 October 1919.  "The tire that was least expected to cause trouble did so.  That's the way of things in this world tho isn't it."

From Mary Simmons to her mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  6 January 1920.  "What time did Pop get back from St. Paul?????"

From George Simmons to his mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  11 January 1920.  "Write to me often as you know how.  I feel it's all in my mind & heart and have no friends, wish that I were healthy full of life and jolly and happy."

From Ben Pringle to his cousin Nellie Pringle Simmons.  25 April 1921.  "I would dearly love to see you all, but Minnesota is a long way off, and I have no Flying Machine."

From Mary Simmons Gray to her mother Nellie Pringle Simmons.  15 October 1923.  "Jane is getting to be a regular little doll - she's getting cuter looking every day and she is getting so strong & wild that I don't know how to manage her at times..."

From Burton Twichell to his friend Carroll Simmons.  21 December 1923.  "You may not survive the shock of this but While the Christmas Spirit has passed me by utterly, I could not but think that I wanted to wish you the Season's very best wishes..."

From Dorothy Gluek to her friend Ellen Simmons.  19 January 1932.  "Then a bunch of us are going to the Gould Casino and dance cause we heard that they have an American orchestra there & that is a treat.  Don't know how we shall get back cause the last tender leaves for the boat at 1:30 A.M. and we plan to dance till 3:30.  Guess the boys are planning on rowing us."

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