03: OST Tables


A lead-in sentence should be framed before the table. The table should include at least two items sharing two comparable properties. It should include a clearly defined header and/ or footer. OST tables should comprise very short phrases or numbers within cells and not sentences. The cell items should be at the same level or have same units. The visual is preferably presented with a lead-out sentence.

Instruction text is presented as a separate paragraph and in a single sentence. No two instructions should be presented on a screen.

The OST tables could be of three types:

  • Simple
  • Complex
  • Data

Note: In table style, do not use nested tables. Instead, embed the table as an object.


Simple Table

The OST can be written in simple table by one-to-one mapping of data on column one with those in other columns.


Example: The example demonstrates how to correctly write OST in simple table style.

Input

Vitamins are organic compounds required in tiny amounts for essential metabolic reactions in a living organism. These are bio-molecules that act both as catalysts and substrates in chemical reactions. There are 13 well-defined vitamins. Few of the vitamins are vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B3 and vitamin B6. The sources of vitamin A are carotene from vegetables, dairy products, liver, and fish liver oil; of vitamin B1 are pork, organ meats, berries and nuts; of vitamin B2 are liver, milk, meat, mushrooms; and of vitamin B3 are poultry, whole grain, dried beans and peas. The deficiencies of vitamin A are skin dryness and dry mucous membranes; of vitamin B1 are Beriberi and leg cramps; of vitamin B2 are skin lesions and sensitivity to light; and of vitamin B3 is Pellagra.

 

Output

Vitamins are organic compounds required in tiny amounts for essential metabolic reactions in a living organism. These are bio-molecules that act both as catalysts and substrates in chemical reactions.

There are 13 well-defined vitamins. The sources and functions of few of the vitamins are:


In this example, the table presented shows one-to-one mapping of vitamin on column one with source and deficiency in other two columns.

Mock-up: This is how the above storyboard output would be integrated as an e-learning courseware screen.


Non-Example: The non-example demonstrates how not to write OST in simple table style.

Input

Vitamins are organic compounds required in tiny amounts for essential metabolic reactions in a living organism. These are bio-molecules that act both as catalysts and substrates in chemical reactions. There are 13 well-defined vitamins. Few of the vitamins are vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B3 and vitamin B6. The sources of vitamin A are carotene from vegetables, dairy products, liver, and fish liver oil; of vitamin B1 are pork, organ meats, berries and nuts; of vitamin B2 are liver, milk, meat, mushrooms; and of vitamin B3 are poultry, whole grain, dried beans and peas. The deficiencies of vitamin A are skin dryness and dry mucous membranes; of vitamin B1 are Beriberi and leg cramps; of vitamin B2 are skin lesions and sensitivity to light; and of vitamin B3 is Pellagra.

 

Output

Vitamins are organic compounds required in tiny amounts for essential metabolic reactions in a living organism. These are bio-molecules that act both as catalysts and substrates in chemical reactions.

There are 13 well-defined vitamins. The sources and functions of few of the vitamins are:


In this non-example, the table does not show one-to-one mapping of the items from column one to the column of deficiencies. The rows in the deficiency column should not be split into halves as the disorders mentioned are just examples of the deficiencies caused.


Complex Tables

In complex tables, the data on column one has a one-to-many mapping with those in column two and three.


Example: The example demonstrates how to correctly write OST in complex table style.

Input

The elements in nature are classified into metals and non-metals. Both metals and non-metals are distinct in their chemical and physical properties. They are represented using symbols. Two examples of metals are Iron and Copper and their symbols are “Fe” and “Cu” respectively. Two examples of non-metals are Chlorine and Hydrogen and their symbols are “Cl” and “H” respectively.

 

Output

The elements in nature are classified into metals and non-metals. Both metals and non-metals are distinct in their chemical and physical properties. They are represented using symbols.

The table provides examples and the corresponding symbol of some of the metals and non-metals:

In this example, the table provides the data of type of chemical element in column one and has one–to-many mapping with example and symbols in column two and three respectively.

Mock-up: This is how the above storyboard output would be integrated as an e-learning courseware screen.


Non-Example: The non-example demonstrates how not to write OST in complex table style.

Input

The elements in nature are classified into metals and non-metals. Both metals and non-metals are distinct in their chemical and physical properties. They are represented using symbols. Two examples of metals are Iron and Copper and their symbols are “Fe” and “Cu” respectively. Two examples of non-metals are Chlorine and Hydrogen and their symbols are “Cl” and “H” respectively.

 

Output

The elements in nature are classified into metals and non-metals. Both metals and non-metals are distinct in their chemical and physical properties. They are represented using symbols.

The table provides examples and the corresponding symbol of some of the metals and non-metals:

In this non-example, the table should show one-to-many mapping of the items of column one to column two and three, but here in column three, the symbols for each chemical element are displayed in a single row, which causes confusion.


Data Tables

While forming data tables, the data are arranged in such way, that similar data can be categorized under a single header.


Example: The example demonstrates how to correctly write OST in data table style.

Input

A polygon is a plane figure that is bounded by a closed path or circuit, composed of a finite number of sequential line segments. The straight line segments that make up the boundary of the polygon are called its sides.

Types of a regular polygon

  • Triangle
    • Interior angle = 60.00 degrees
    • Exterior angle = 120.00°
    • Sides = 3
  • Quadrilateral
    • Interior angle = 90 degrees
    • Exterior angle = 90°
    • Sides = 4
  • Pentagon
    • Interior angle = 108.00°
    • Exterior angle = 72.00 degree
    • Sides = 5
  • Hexagon
    • Interior angle = 120.00 degree
    • Exterior angle = 60.00
    • Sides = 6


Output

A polygon is a plane figure that is bounded by a closed path or circuit, composed of a finite number of sequential line segments. The straight line segments that make up the boundary of the polygon are called its sides.

The characteristics of different types of regular polygons are tabulated below:

In this example, the data in the table is arranged in such a way, that the similar data, that is, the measure of interior and exterior angles is categorized under single header “degrees”.

Mock-up: This is how the above storyboard output would be integrated as an e-learning courseware screen.


Non-Example: The non-example demonstrates how not to write OST in data table style.

Input

A polygon is a plane figure that is bounded by a closed path or circuit, composed of a finite number of sequential line segments. The straight line segments that make up the boundary of the polygon are called its sides.

Types of a regular polygon

  • Triangle
    • Interior angle = 60.00 degrees
    • Exterior angle = 120.00°
    • Sides = 3
  • Quadrilateral
    • Interior angle = 90 degrees
    • Exterior angle = 90°
    • Sides = 4
  • Pentagon
    • Interior angle = 108.00°
    • Exterior angle = 72.00 degree
    • Sides = 5
  • Hexagon
    • Interior angle = 120.00 degree
    • Exterior angle = 60.00
    • Sides = 6


Output

A polygon is a plane figure that is bounded by a closed path or circuit, composed of a finite number of sequential line segments. The straight line segments that make up the boundary of the polygon are called its sides.

The characteristics of different types of regular polygons are tabulated below:

In this non-example, the measurement of the interior angle and exterior angle are given in degrees, but represented in different forms. Consistency is essential. The numerals can be put under a common header “degrees”.