PTR pedals


The PTR load cell pedal is an upgrade kit for the Logitech G25 or G27. 



Key features:


- Longer and more ergonomic pedals for greater comfort and longer throw. It also improves throttle feel and precision as well

- Precision load cell - 35kg (~77lbs) high-quality - to measure braking pressure/force

- Automotive quality rubber inserts - very durable material which provides a progressive feel for the brake pedal while maintaining most of the stock pedal throw

- Progressive resistance. Feeling wise these pedals are right in between non-servo racing brakes and street-car brakes. They feel like a high performance road car brake.

- Pedal height modelled after Tilton and Willwood racing pedals and the pedal faces are adjustable in two positions

- Stainless steel construction - very strong and very durable

- Load cell amplifier - excellent quality

- Improved resolution and refresh rate by using Leo Bodnar's excellent USB controller -recommended, sold separately for windows users
- PS3 compatible

- DIY installation is easy and requires only basic tools



Introduction:


The stock pedals are sturdy, reliable and made of high-quality materials but there is a downfall: They are too short, they look and feel like they are made for children and

the spring/potentiometer setup in the brake pedal does not feel like a real brake pedal at all. Simulations and advanced driving games require more control.


We wanted to have a complete solution for the problem

so we set out to design our own pedal system.

While doing so, we realised that Logitech’s design is pretty good but it needed a few modifications to make it perfect.



We have several years of R&D experience on race cars and modified street cars, so we took measurements from brake systems, made prototypes and after countless hours of late night brainstor

ming and testing (lots of fun) we built something that we love very much and believe solves the issues with Logitech’s stock pedals.


The extended length of the pedal shafts is perfect for adult sized feet and the longer throw distance allows for much more throttle and brake control.

 

The longer pedal shafts also allowed us to install a very precise, high-quality load cell.


The advantage behind the load cell or pressure sensitive measurement is simple: rather than measuring pedal travel, it measures the actual load or pressure applied by the driver’s foot on the brake pedal.

It is extremely accurate and it's adjustable to measure forces of up to 35kg (~77lbs).


Braking feel is greatly improved by adding a very durable, automotive quality rubber insert inside the stock spring which feels like a high performance road car brake that most of us is familiar with.

This allowed us to preserve a fairly long pedal throw and a progressive feeling that provides extreme precision for modulation of braking pressure/force.

After an initial soft zone, the pedal gets progressively stiffer without that familiar springy feeling. This almost feels like pads grabbing the disk, so braking feels completely realistic in every way.


Please check our videos.

That is how smooth you can get on and off the brakes.


For windows only users to complete the setup, resolution and calibration are improved by using Leo Bodnar's excellent USB controller -recommended, sold separately.

This is a very high quality, stand-alone solution for the Logitech pedals that provide four times the resolution of the stock pedals (10bit - 1024 steps), twice the refresh rate (250Hz) and a magnificent calibration software that allows for modifying pedal settings on the fly, without having to close the sim/racing game!



What you get with your PTR pedal kit:


- Longer clutch and throttle pedal shafts.

- Longer brake pedal - preassembled for easy installation:

  • 35kg (~77lbs) load cell.
  • Bracket to hold the load cell to the pedal shaft.
  • Load cell amplifier
  • Stiffer clutch spring
  • Wiring
  • Rubber insert
  • Mounting hardware

Pre-Order Today!


- It usually takes 3-5 weeks to deliver the pedals

- Price is $159




















ċ
Attila Kiss,
Feb 15, 2011, 11:53 AM
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