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Slot Car Wire Wheels

Peter's 1/32 wire wheels was a project which was created to produce wire wheels which showed all the features of the originals; side laced, centre laced and/or cross laced spokes, correct spoke patterns for different applications, left and right handed wheel nuts where required and correct scale diameters across flanges. Rim widths in most cases were over-scale, for practical purposes.

Rudge Whitworth, Dunlop and Borrani. These are effectively the same wheels, albeit made in England or Italy. Rudge Whitworth patented the design of a wire wheel with an internally splined centre, mounted on an externally splined hub, clamped in place by a central nut.
Rudge Whitworth Milano started making these wheels under licence in 1922. The company was re-formed later as Carlo Borrani SA Milano in 1939 and then as Carlo Borrani SPA Milano in 1951.
In Britain, the Rudge wheels were made by Dunlop. 
In 1908 a Napier was entered for the French Grand Prix fitted with Rudge pattern wheels. The advantage of these wheels was obviously recognised by the organisers and the cars were promptly banned.

Rudge type wheels were the standard 'race' wheel until about 1950 when Halibrand introduced the 6 peg drive alloy wheel for Indy cars.
The last Grand Prix car run with wire wheels was a Ferrari 156 in 1962
The last Le Mans car to run with wire wheels was a Ferrari 275GTB/4 in 1969 although evidence suggests that a 365GTB/4 may have carried a wire wheel as a 'space-saver' spare in 1974.

There is probably a greater variety of real wire wheels now available (new) than ever before.

Slot car scratchbuilding.

There are two English language forums dedicated to scratchbuilt cars, one for sports cars, one for 'open wheelers'.

The Sports Car Forum caters for all sports cars, with a bias towards racing sports cars or all eras.
The F1 Forum caters for all 'open wheelers'. These include all Grands Prix/F1 cars, as well as Indy cars, Voiturettes and indeed any car which raced without wings/mudguards.