World War One Memorials and Cemeteries



Names of Servicemen on the War Memorial Who Lost Their Lives in The Great War.  

Their Resting Place or Memorial.


LONE PINE MEMORIAL

Country: Turkey

Historical Information: The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. On 6 August, further landings were made at Suvla, just north of Anzac, and the climax of the campaign came in early August when simultaneous assaults were launched on all three fronts. Lone Pine was a strategically important plateau in the southern part of Anzac which was briefly in the hands of Australian forces following the landings on 25 April. It became a Turkish strong point from May to July, when it was known by them as 'Kanli Sirt' (Bloody Ridge). The Australians pushed mines towards the plateau from the end of May to the beginning of August and on the afternoon of 6 August, after mine explosions and bombardment from land and sea, the position was stormed by the 1st Australian Brigade. By 10 August, the Turkish counter-attacks had failed and the position was consolidated. It was held by the 1st Australian Division until 12 September, and then by the 2nd, until the evacuation of the peninsula in December. The LONE PINE MEMORIAL stands on the site of the fiercest fighting at Lone Pine and overlooks the whole front line of May 1915. It commemorates more than 4,900 Australian and New Zealand servicemen who died in the Anzac area - the New Zealanders prior to the fighting in August 1915 - whose graves are not known. Others named on the memorial died at sea and were buried in Gallipoli waters. The memorial stands in LONE PINE CEMETERY. The original small battle cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when scattered graves were brought in from the neighbourhood, and from Brown's Dip North and South Cemeteries, which were behind the Australian trenches of April-August 1915. There are now 1,167 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 504 of the burials are unidentified. Special memorials commemorate 183 soldiers (all but one of them Australian, most of whom died in August), who were known or believed to have been buried in Lone Pine Cemetery, or in the cemeteries at Brown's Dip.  

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are remembered at Lone Pine Memorial.

Lieutenant Norman James Greig.  Norman was killed in action on the 12th July 1915 aged 24 years at Gallipoli. He has no known grave, but he is remembered on Panel 27 of the memorial. 

Private Henry Robert Lee. Regimental No. 2171. He was killed in action on the 8th August 1915.Panel Reference 42.


THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Country: France

Historical Information: On 1 July 1916, supported by a French attack to the south, thirteen divisions of Commonwealth forces launched an offensive on a line from north of Gommecourt to Maricourt. Despite a preliminary bombardment lasting seven days, the German defences were barely touched and the attack met unexpectedly fierce resistance. Losses were catastrophic and with only minimal advances on the southern flank, the initial attack was a failure. In the following weeks, huge resources of manpower and equipment were deployed in an attempt to exploit the modest successes of the first day. However, the German Army resisted tenaciously and repeated attacks and counter attacks meant a major battle for every village, copse and farmhouse gained. At the end of September, Thiepval was finally captured. The village had been an original objective of 1 July. Attacks north and east continued throughout October and into November in increasingly difficult weather conditions. The Battle of the Somme finally ended on 18 November with the onset of winter. In the spring of 1917, the German forces fell back to their newly prepared defences, the Hindenburg Line, and there were no further significant engagements in the Somme sector until the Germans mounted their major offensive in March 1918. The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial also serves as an Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the memorial. The memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was built between 1928 and 1932 and unveiled by the Prince of Wales, in the presence of the President of France, on 1 August 1932 (originally scheduled for 16 May but due to the death of French President Doumer the ceremony was postponed until August). The dead of other Commonwealth countries, who died on the Somme and have no known graves, are commemorated on national memorials elsewhere.  

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are remembered at Thiepval.

Captain Robin Blackwood Ritchie Robin served with the 2nd Cameroonians (Scottish Regiment). He was killed in action on the 20th July 1916 aged 22 years. He is remembered on Pier and Face 4 D.


HARGICOURT BRITISH CEMETERY

Country: France

Historical Information: Hargicourt was occupied by British troops in April 1917, lost on the 21st March 1918, and recaptured by Australian troops on the 18th September 1918. Hargicourt British Cemetery was begun in May 1917, and used by fighting units until March 1918; some further burials were made in September and October 1918, and three British graves were brought in after the Armistice from HARGICOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY GERMAN EXTENSION. It was largely used by the 34th Division, under the name of Hargicourt Quarry Cemetery (derived from the quarry across the railway line). There are now over 300, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this cemetery. Of these, over 30 are unidentified and a special memorial is erected to a United Kingdom soldier known to be buried among them. The British Cemetery covers an area of 2,151 square metres and is enclosed by a flint and stone wall.  



Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at Hargicourt British Cemetery.

Lieutenant Francis O'Connor Twomey Francis died of wounds on the 29th September 1918 aged 40 years. He is buried in Plot L, Row L, Grave No 2.


VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MEMORIAL

Country: France

Historical Information: Villers-Bretonneux became famous in 1918, when the German advance on Amiens ended in the capture of the village by their tanks and infantry on 23 April. On the following day, the 4th and 5th Australian Divisions, with units of the 8th and 18th Divisions, recaptured the whole of the village and on 8 August 1918, the 2nd and 5th Australian Divisions advanced from its eastern outskirts in the Battle of Amiens. The memorial is the Australian National Memorial erected to commemorate all Australian soldiers who fought in France and Belgium during the First World War, to their dead, and especially to name those of the dead whose graves are not known. The Australian servicemen named in this register died in the battlefields of the Somme, Arras, the German advance of 1918 and the Advance to Victory. The memorial stands within Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery, which was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from other burial grounds in the area and from the battlefields. Both the cemetery and memorial were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. The memorial was unveiled by King George VI on 22 July 1938. DISCOVERY OF REMAINS AND ADDITIONAL COMMEMORATIONS Of the 10,982 names displayed at the unveiling of the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial the burial places of many have since been identified and this continues to this day; 6 of these being among the significant discovery of 250 burials which culminated in the first new Commission cemetery in 50 years being dedicated in July 2010 as Fromelles (Pheasant Wood) Cemetery. All these discoveries are now commemorated by individual headstones in the cemeteries where their remains lie and their details recorded in the relevant cemetery registers; their names will be removed from this memorial in due course. Time has also revealed more names not previously notified which have now been added to this memorial and register. There are now 10,765 Australian servicemen officially commemorated by this memorial and named within the register.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are remembered at Villers-Bretonneux Memorial.

Sergeant Arthur Bertram Arnel MM Regimental No 1547. Arthur was killed in action on the 23rd August 1916. He has no known grave but is remembered on the memorial.

Private Archibald John Bowman. Regimental No 5343. Archibald died on the 11th April 1917 aged 23 years.

Private Patrick Brady. Regimental No 7451. Patrick was killed in action on the 19th September 1918 aged 35 years. No known grave.

Private Daniel Collins Regimental No 5971. Daniel was killed in action on the 3rd May 1917 aged 24 years.

Private Robert Cook Regimental No 6981. Robert was killed in action on the 13th August 1918 aged 29 years.

Private George Henry Dark Regimental No 3069. George was killed in action on the 4th December 1916 aged 25 years.

Private Leo Duckmanton Regimental No 853. Leo was killed in action between the 5th-8th May 1917. He was aged 27 years.

Private Bradley McKay. Regimental No 2708. Killed in action on the 25th August 1916. Aged 23 years. 

Private Timon Claude Wilson. Regimental No 6369. He was killed in action on the 23rd April 1917. Aged 29 years.

Private Frank Williams. Regimental No. 2836B. Killed in action on the 23rd July 1916. 



VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MILITARY CEMETERY

Country: France

Historical Information: Villers-Bretonneux became famous in 1918, when the German advance on Amiens ended in the capture of the village by their tanks and infantry on 23 April. On the following day, the 4th and 5th Australian Divisions, with units of the 8th and 18th Divisions, recaptured the whole of the village and on 8 August 1918, the 2nd and 5th Australian Divisions advanced from its eastern outskirts in the Battle of Amiens. VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MILITARY CEMETERY was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from other burial grounds in the area and from the battlefields. Plots I to XX were completed by 1920 and contain mostly Australian graves, almost all from the period March to August 1918. Plots IIIA, VIA, XIIIA and XVIA, and Rows in other Plots lettered AA, were completed by 1925, and contain a much larger proportion of unidentified graves brought from a wider area. Later still, 444 graves were brought in from Dury Hospital Military Cemetery. The following were among the burial grounds from which graves were taken to Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery. CARD COPSE CEMETERY, MARCELCAVE, on the road to Fouilloy, where 35 Australian soldiers were buried by the 2nd Australian Division in July and August 1918. DURY HOSPITAL MILITARY, CEMETERY, under the wall of the Asylum near the West side of the Amiens-Dury road. From August 1918 to January 1919, this building was used intermittently by British medical units, and a cemetery was made next to an existing French Military Cemetery. The British cemetery contained the graves of 195 Canadian and 185 United Kingdom soldiers and airmen; 63 Australian soldiers; one man of the Cape Auxiliary Horse Transport Corps; and one French and one American soldier. HIGH CEMETERY, SAILLY-LE-SEC, on the road to Ville-sur-Ancre, where 18 United Kingdom and eleven Australian soldiers were buried in June-August 1918. KANGAROO CEMETERY, SAILLY-LE-SEC (on the Ville-sur-Ancre road, but nearer Sailly), where 13 Australian soldiers were buried by the 41st Battalion in March-April 1918, and 14 of the 58th (London) Division by their comrades in August 1918. LAMOTTE-EN-SANTERRE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION. The village was captured by Australian troops on the 8th August 1918, and the Extension contained the graves of 56 Australian and twelve United Kingdom soldiers who fell in August and September. LA NEUVILLE-LES-BRAY COMMUNAL CEMETERY, containing the grave of one Australian soldier who fell in August 1918. LE HAMELET BRITISH CEMETERY (behind the Church), contained the graves of 25 Australian soldiers who fell in April-July 1918; and the COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, in which 27 Australian soldiers and one from the United Kingdom were buried in July and August 1916. MIDWAY CEMETERY, MARCELCAVE, 1,400 metres North-West of Marcelcave Church, made by the Canadian Corps and containing the graves of 53 Canadian and three United Kingdom soldiers who fell in August 1918. VAUX-SUR-SOMME COMMUNAL CEMETERY, contained three Australian graves of March-April 1918, and two United Kingdom of 1916 and 1917; and the EXTENSION, made in May-August 1918, and contained the graves of 130 Australian soldiers and 104 soldiers (mainly 58th Division and Artillery) and one airman from the United Kingdom. WARFUSEE-ABANCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, in which five Australian soldiers were buried by the 12th Australian Field Ambulance in August 1918. There are now 2,142 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 609 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to five casualties known or believed to be buried among them, and to 15 buried in other cemeteries whose graves could not be found on concentration. The cemetery also contains the graves of two New Zealand airmen of the Second World War. Within the cemetery stands the VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MEMORIAL, the Australian national memorial erected to commemorate all Australian soldiers who fought in France and Belgium during the First World War, to their dead, and especially to name those of the dead whose graves are not known. The 10,765 Australian servicemen named on the memorial died in the battlefields of the Somme, Arras, the German advance of 1918 and the Advance to Victory. The memorial was unveiled by King George VI on 22 July 1938. The cemetery and the memorial were both designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery.

Private William Clark Regimental No 423. William was killed in action on the 23rd June 1919 aged 24 years. He is buried in Plot X, Row C, Grave No 4.


YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL

Country: Belgium

Historical Information: The Menin Gate is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Broadly speaking, the Salient stretched from Langemarck in the north to the northern edge in Ploegsteert Wood in the south, but it varied in area and shape throughout the war. The Salient was formed during the First Battle of Ypres in October and November 1914, when a small British Expeditionary Force succeeded in securing the town before the onset of winter, pushing the German forces back to the Passchendaele Ridge. The Second Battle of Ypres began in April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. This was the first time gas had been used by either side and the violence of the attack forced an Allied withdrawal and a shortening of the line of defence. There was little more significant activity on this front until 1917, when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive was mounted by Commonwealth forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south. The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November with the capture of Passchendaele. The German offensive of March 1918 met with some initial success, but was eventually checked and repulsed in a combined effort by the Allies in September. The battles of the Ypres Salient claimed many lives on both sides and it quickly became clear that the commemoration of members of the Commonwealth forces with no known grave would have to be divided between several different sites. The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates casualties from the forces of Australia, Canada, India, South Africa and United Kingdom who died in the Salient. In the case of United Kingdom casualties, only those prior 16 August 1917 (with some exceptions). United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war. New Zealand casualties that died prior to 16 August 1917 are commemorated on memorials at Buttes New British Cemetery and Messines Ridge British Cemetery. The YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL now bears the names of more than 54,000 officers and men whose graves are not known. The memorial, designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield with sculpture by Sir William Reid-Dick, was unveiled by Lord Plumer on 24 July 1927.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are remembered at Ypres Menin Gate Memorial.

Sergeant Richard Desmond Kelly. Regimental No 3370. Richard was killed in action on the 4th October 1915 aged 22 years. Remembered on Panel 7.

Sergeant Walton Robert Grayson DCM. Regimental No 719. Walton was killed in action on the 26th April 1918. Remembered on Panel 7

Lance Corporal Robert Charles Gordon Greig MM Regimental No 1679. Robert was killed in action on the 9th October 1917 aged 24 years. Remembered on Panel 31.

Corporal Horace Munt. Regimental No 2456. Killed in action on the 12th November 1917. Aged  30 years. Panel Reference Panel 7 - 17 - 23 - 25 - 27 - 29 - 31.

Private Rupert Harold Langley. Regimental No. 7046. He was killed in action on the 20th September 1917. Panel Reference : Panel 7 - 17 - 23 - 25 - 27 - 29 - 31.

Private Guy Everard Looker. Regimental No 4530. He was killed in action on the 26th September 1917 aged 30 years.Panel Reference: Panel 31

Gunner Patrick Joseph McGloin. Regimental No.27644. He died of wounds on the 3rd October 1917. Aged 35 years.  Panel Reference : Panel 7

Private James Anderson McLaughlin. Regimental No 4568. Killed in action on the 1st October 1917 aged 31 years. Panel Reference: Panel 7 - 17 - 23 - 25 - 27 - 29 - 31.

Private William Leslie Smith. Regimental No. 995. Killed in action on the 4th October 1917 aged 22 years. Reference Panel 7 - 17 - 23 - 25 - 27 - 29 - 31.



CAIRO WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY

Country: Egypt

Historical Information: At the outbreak of the First World War, Cairo was headquarters to the United Kingdom garrison in Egypt. With Alexandria, it became the main hospital centre for Gallipoli in 1915 and later dealt with the sick and wounded from operations in Egypt and Palestine. General Headquarters, Middle East Command, was set up in Cairo shortly before the Second World War, remaining there throughout the war years. In January 1941, a Royal Air Force Sector Headquarters for Fighter Defence Canal Zone was established. Cairo was again a significant hospital centre during the Second World War. Cairo War Memorial Cemetery was formerly part of the New British Protestant Cemetery, but plots B, D, F, H, K, M, O, P and Q were ceded to the Commission in 1920. Some graves were brought into these plots from elsewhere in the Protestant cemetery and in 1960, 85 First World War graves were concentrated from Minia War Cemetery, 200 km south of Cairo, where maintenance could not be assured. One burial of the Second World War was also moved later from Old Cairo Old Latin Cemetery for the same reason. There are now 2,056 Commonwealth casualties of the First World War and 340 from the Second World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. A small number, known to have been buried in other civil cemeteries in Cairo but whose graves are now lost, are commemorated by special memorial. Burials in the following civil cemeteries are now alternatively commemorated in Cairo War Memorial Cemetery: Cairo (Basatin) Jewish Cemetery Old Cairo Jewish Cemetery Cairo Maronite Cemetery Cairo Civil International Cemetery Old Cairo New Latin Cemetery  



Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at Cairo War Memorial Cemetery.

Lance Sergeant Frank Jubilee Olle Regimental No 723. Frank died of wounds on the 31st may 1915 aged 28 yeras. He is buried in Row B, Grave No 270.


LA KREULE MILITARY CEMETERY, HAZEBROUCK

Country: France

Historical Information: La Kreule Military Cemetery was opened in April 1918 by the 1st and 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations, which came back from Outtersteene ahead of the German advance, and the 17th, which arrived from Lijssenthoek. These three stations, known collectively as "Ana Jana Siding", were posted to the north of La Kreule, but in the middle of April they withdrew to Blendecques, near St. Omer, and the cemetery was then used by heavy artillery and fighting units. In October 1918, the 17th Casualty Clearing Station returned with the 8th and the 64th and the cemetery was closed at the end of the month. The cemetery contains 576 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 11 German war graves. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker. 



Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at La Kreule Military Cemetery.

Private Norman Lee MM. Regimental No 2629. Norman was killed in action on the 22nd June 1918. He is buried in Plot I, Row F, Grave No 7.


MESSINES RIDGE BRITISH CEMETERY

Country: Belgium

Historical Information: Messines (now Mesen) was considered a strong strategic position, not only from its height above the plain below, but from the extensive system of cellars under the convent known as the 'Institution Royale.' The village was taken from the 1st Cavalry Division by the German 26th Division on 31 October-1 November 1914. An attack by French troops on 6 -7 November was unsuccessful and it was not until the Battle of Messines on 7 June 1917 that it was retaken by the New Zealand Division. On 10-11 April 1918, the village fell into German hands once more after a stubborn defence by the South African Brigade, but was retaken for the last time on 28-29 September 1918. MESSINES RIDGE BRITISH CEMETERY, which stands on ground that belonged to the 'Institution Royale' (the Cross of Sacrifice is on the site of the Institution's windmill), was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefield around Messines and from the following small burial grounds:- BELL FARM CEMETERY, WYTSCHAETE, near the South side of the Messines-Kemmel road, where 32 soldiers of the 25th Division were buried in June, 1917. BLAUWEPOORTBEEK CEMETERY, WYTSCHAETE, 1.6 kms North-East of Messines, where 16 Australian and seven United Kingdom soldiers were buried in August-October, 1917. BOUSBECQUES EAST GERMAN CEMETERY, on the South side of the village, where four soldiers from the United Kingdom were buried by a German Field Hospital in November, 1914. BRISTOL CASTLE MILITARY CEMETERY, MESSINES, on the Wulverghem road near Wulverghem, where 32 United Kingdom soldiers of the 36th (Ulster) and 14th (Light) Divisions were buried in September and October, 1918. LUMM FARM CEMETERY, WYTSCHAETE, a little East of the Messines road, where 13 United Kingdom and two Australian soldiers were buried in June-September, 1917. MIDDLE FARM CEMETERY, WYTSCHAETE, near the Messines road 500 metres North of Messines, where 16 Australian, 14 United Kingdom and four New Zealand soldiers were buried in July-December, 1917. ONRAET FARM CEMETERY, WYTSCHAETE, between Wytschaete and St. Eloi, in which 29 soldiers of the 36th Division were buried in June-August, 1917. QUEENSLAND CEMETERY, WARNETON, on the lower road from Messines to Warneton, where 30 Australian soldiers (of whom 23 belonged to the 41st Battalion) and three from the United Kingdom were buried in June and July, 1917. RIVER DOUVE CEMETERY, MESSINES (also called Snitchel Farm) on the river bank South of Messines, containing the graves of 24 Australian and four United Kingdom soldiers who fell in June-November, 1917. The dates of death of those buried here range from October 1914 to October 1918, but the majority died in the fighting of 1917. There are now 1,532 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 955 of the burials are unidentified, but special memorials commemorate a number of casualties known or believed to be buried among them, or who were buried in other cemeteries where their graves were destroyed by shell fire. Within the cemetery stands the MESSINES RIDGE (NEW ZEALAND) MEMORIAL which commemorates over 800 soldiers of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force who died in or near Messines in 1917 and 1918 and who have no known grave. This is one of seven memorials in France and Belgium to those New Zealand soldiers who died on the Western Front and whose graves are not known. The memorials are all in cemeteries chosen as appropriate to the fighting in which the men died. Both cemetery and memorial were designed by Charles Holden.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Messines Ridge British Cemetery.

Lance Corporal Charles Sharrock. Regimental No 602. Charles was killed in action on the 8th June 1916. He is buried in Plot I, Row C, grave No 19.


COLOGNE SOUTHERN CEMETERY

Country: Germany

Historical Information: Cologne was entered by Commonwealth forces on 6 December 1918 and occupied under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles until January 1926. COLOGNE SOUTHERN CEMETERY was used during the war for the burial of more than 1,000 Allied prisoners, as well as German servicemen. After the Armistice it was used by the occupying garrison. In 1922 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. Cologne Southern was one of those chosen and the following year, graves were brought in from 183 burial grounds* in Hanover, Hesse, the Rhine and Westphalia. There are now 2,482 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the Commonwealth plots at Cologne. The total includes special memorials to a number of casualties buried in other cemeteries in Germany whose graves could not be found. The Commonwealth section of the cemetery also contains 132 Second World War graves, mostly those of servicemen who died with the occupying forces. There are, in addition, 676 non-war graves and 29 burials of other nationalities. The COLOGNE MEMORIAL takes the form of panels set inside the north shelter building at the entrance to the Commonweatlh plots in Cologne Southern Cemetery. It commemorates 25 servicemen of the United Kingdom who died in Germany and who have no known grave. Of these, 19 are known to have died as prisoners and their places of burial are not recorded. The other six died after the Armistice by drowning and their bodies were not recovered. *The following cemeteries are among those from which graves were brought to Cologne: AACHEN MILITARY CEMETERY, 197 burials of sailors 1914-1919. BONN (POPPELSDORF) CEMETERY, 133 service and one civilian burial, all of 1919. The 47th General Hospital and the 21st Casualty Clearing Station were posted at Bonn. BUDERICH (FORT BLUCHER) PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, 39 burials of 1914-1919. COBLENZ FRENCH MILITARY CEMETERY, KARTHAUSE, 59 burials of 1915-1918. Coblenz was occupied by United States troops in December 1918. DORTMUND SOUTH-WESTERN CEMETERY, 53 burials of 1914-1918. DUISBURG TOWN CEMETERY, 35 burials of 1914-1919. DULMEN PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, 96 burials of 1915-1918. DUREN NEW TOWN CEMETERY, 79 burials, mostly of 1919. The 11th Stationary Hospital and the 17th Casualty Clearing Station were posted at Duren. DUSSELDORF NORTH CEMETERY, 24 burials of 1915-1918. ESSEN SOUTH-WESTERN CEMETERY, 21 burials of 1917-1918. EUSKIRCHEN NEW TOWN CEMETERY, 75 service and one civilian burials of 1918-1919. The 42nd Stationary Hospital and the 47th Casualty Clearing Station were posted at Euskirchen. FRIEDRICHSFELD PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, 70 burials of 1916-1918. FRIEMERSHEIM CEMETERY, 20 burials of 1918. GELSENKIRCHEN WEST CEMETERY, 21 burials of 1917-1918. GEROLSTEIN MILITARY CEMETERY, 25 burials of 1918. JULICH MILITARY, 39 burials of 1915-1918. MULHEIM-AM-RUHR OLD TOWN CEMETERY, 49 burials of 1915-1918. MUNSTER (HAUSPITAL) PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, 161 burials of 1914-1918. RECKLINGHAUSEN PROTESTANT, CATHOLIC AND SOUTH CEMETERIES, 26 burials of 1916-1918. TRIER TOWN CEMETERY, 48 burials of 1917-1918.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Cologne Southern Cemetery.

Private Ernest Ballinger. Regimental No 1272. Ernest  died as a prisoner of war on the 15th June 1918 aged 23 years.


SUTTON VENY (ST. JOHN) CHURCHYARD

Country: United Kingdom

Historical Information: During the two world wars, the United Kingdom became an island fortress used for training troops and launching land, sea and air operations around the globe. There are more than 170,000 Commonwealth war graves in the United Kingdom, many being those of servicemen and women killed on active service, or who later succumbed to wounds. Others died in training accidents, or because of sickness or disease. The graves, many of them privately owned and marked by private memorials, will be found in more than 12,000 cemeteries and churchyards. The 26th Division was concentrated at Sutton Veny in April 1915 and No 1 Australian Command was there from the end of 1916 to October 1919. There was also a hutted military hospital of more than 1200 beds at Sutton Veny for much of the war and No 1 Australian General Hospital was stationed there after the Armistice. Sutton Veny (St John) Churchyard contains 168 First World War burials, 167 of them in a plot at the north west corner of the church. Of these, 143 are Australian. There is only one Second World War burial in the churchyard.



Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Sutton Veny (St John) Churchyard.

Gunner Norman Frances Beggs. Regimental No 37533. Norman died aged 19 years on the 24th January 1918.


HELLES MEMORIAL

Country: Turkey

Historical Information: The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. On 6 August, further landings were made at Suvla, just north of Anzac, and the climax of the campaign came in early August when simultaneous assaults were launched on all three fronts. However, the difficult terrain and stiff Turkish resistance soon led to the stalemate of trench warfare. From the end of August, no further serious action was fought and the lines remained unchanged. The peninsula was successfully evacuated in December and early January 1916. The Helles Memorial serves the dual function of Commonwealth battle memorial for the whole Gallipoli campaign and place of commemoration for many of those Commonwealth servicemen who died there and have no known grave. The United Kingdom and Indian forces named on the memorial died in operations throughout the peninsula, the Australians at Helles. There are also panels for those who died or were buried at sea in Gallipoli waters. The memorial bears more than 21,000 names. There are four other Memorials to the Missing at Gallipoli. The Lone Pine, Hill 60, and Chunuk Bair Memorials commemorate Australian and New Zealanders at Anzac. The Twelve Tree Copse Memorial commemorates the New Zealanders at Helles. Naval casualties of the United Kingdom lost or buried at sea are recorded on their respective Memorials at Portsmouth, Plymouth and Chatham, in the United Kingdom.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are remembered at Helles Memorial.

Private Charles Brady. Regimental No 1085. Charles was killed in action on the 8th May 1915. He was aged 36 years.


BAZENTIN-LE-PETIT MILITARY CEMETERY

Country: France

Historical Information: Bazentin was in German hands until 14 July 1916 when the 3rd and 7th Divisions captured the two villages (and the communal cemetery) and held them against counter-attacks, and the 21st Division captured Bazentin-le-Petit Wood. The ground was lost in April 1918 during the great German advance but recaptured on the following 25 August by the 38th (Welsh) Division. The military cemetery was begun at the end of July 1916 and used as a front-line cemetery until May 1917. It contains 182 First World War burials, 15 of them unidentified



Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Bazentin-Le-Petit Military Cemetery.

Private Alexander Donald Cameron. Regimental No 3700. Alexander was killed in action 10th February 1917 aged 27 years. He is buried in Row D, Grave No 29.


LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY

Country: Belgium

Historical Information: During the First World War, the village of Lijssenthoek was situated on the main communication line between the Allied military bases in the rear and the Ypres battlefields. Close to the Front, but out of the extreme range of most German field artillery, it became a natural place to establish casualty clearing stations. The cemetery was first used by the French 15th Hopital D'Evacuation and in June 1915, it began to be used by casualty clearing stations of the Commonwealth forces. From April to August 1918, the casualty clearing stations fell back before the German advance and field ambulances (including a French ambulance) took their places. The cemetery contains 9,901 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 24 being unidentified. There are 883 war graves of other nationalities; mostly French and German, 11 of these are unidentified. There is 1 Non World War burial here. The only concentration burials were 24 added to Plot XXXI in 1920 from isolated positions near Poperinghe and 17 added to Plot XXXII from St. Denijs Churchyard in 1981. Eight of the headstones are Special Memorials to men known to be buried in this cemetery; these are located together alongside Plot 32 near the Stone of Remembrance. The cemetery, designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield, is the second largest Commonwealth cemetery in Belgium. 


Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

Private John Cameron. Regimental No 2797. John died of wounds on the 13th October 1917 aged 33 years. He is buried in Plot XXI, Row C, Grave No 17.


BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD)

Country: France

Historical Information: Bailleul was occupied on 14 October 1914 by the 19th Brigade and the 4th Division. It became an important railhead, air depot and hospital centre, with the 2nd, 3rd, 8th, 11th, 53rd, 1st Canadian and 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Stations quartered in it for considerable periods. It was a Corps headquarters until July 1917, when it was severely bombed and shelled, and after the Battle of Bailleul (13-15 April 1918), it fell into German hands and was not retaken until 30 August 1918. The earliest Commonwealth burials at Bailleul were made at the east end of the communal cemetery and in April 1915, when the space available had been filled, the extension was opened on the east side of the cemetery. The extension was used until April 1918, and again in September, and after the Armistice graves were brought in from the neighbouring battlefields and the following burial grounds:- PONT-DE-NIEPPE GERMAN CEMETERY, on the South side of the hamlet of Pont-de-Nieppe, made in the summer of 1918. It contained German graves (now removed) and those of a soldier and an airman from the United Kingdom. RENINGHELST CHINESE CEMETERY, in a field a little South of the Poperinghe-Brandhoek road, where 30 men of the Chinese Labour Corps were buried in November 1917-March 1918. BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY contains 610 Commonwealth burials of the First World War; 17 of the graves were destroyed by shell fire and are represented by special memorials. BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION contains 4,403 Commonwealth burials of the First World War; 11 of the graves made in April 1918 were destroyed by shell fire and are represented by special memorials. There are also 17 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War and 154 German burials from both wars. Both the Commonwealth plot in the communal cemetery and the extension were designed by Sir Herbert Baker. In the centre of the town is a stone obelisk erected by the 25th Division as their Memorial on the Western front, recalling particularly the beginning of their war service at Bailleul and their part in the Battle of Messines. The town War Memorial, a copy of the ruined tower and belfry of the Church of St. Vaast, was unveiled in 1925 by the Lord Mayor of Bradford, the City which had "adopted" Bailleul.              

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension.

Private George Frederick Conboy. Regimental No 643. George died of wounds on the 24th February 1917 aged 21 years. He is buried at Plot III, Row A, Grave No 18.

Private Thorald Womersley. Regimental No 480. Died of wounds on the 13th June 1919 aged 22 years. Grave Reference II. B. 179.



BERNAFAY WOOD BRITISH CEMETERY, MONTAUBAN

Country: France

Historical Information: Montauban village was taken by the 30th and 18th Divisions on 1 July 1916 and it remained in Commonwealth hands until the end of March 1918. It was retaken on 25 August 1918 by the 7th Buffs and the 11th Royal Fusiliers of the 18th Division. The Bois De Bernafay is a pear-shaped wood close to the east end of Montauban village. It was taken on 3 and 4 July 1916 by the 9th (Scottish) Division. On 25 March 1918, in the retreat to the Ancre, the same Division was driven from the wood but recaptured it for a time. On 27 August 1918 it was finally regained by the 18th Division. The cemetery was begun by a dressing station in August 1916 and used as a front-line cemetery until the following April. It contained at the Armistice 284 burials but was then increased when graves were brought in from Bernafay Wood North Cemetery and from the battlefields immediately east of the wood. BERNAFAY WOOD NORTH CEMETERY was opposite the North edge of the wood, a little East of the Longueval - Maricourt road. It was begun by an Advanced Dressing Station, and used from July to October 1916. It contained the graves of 80 soldiers from the United Kingdom and 1 German prisoner. Bernafay Wood British Cemetery now contains 945 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 417 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 11 soldiers known or believed to be buried here. Other special memorials commemorate 12 soldiers buried in Bernafay Wood North Cemetery whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker



Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Bernafay Wood British Cemetery.

Private Albert William Dark. Regimental No 1157. Albert died of wounds on the 5th December 1916. He was aged 27  years. He is buried in Row I, Grave No 44.

Driver Harry Holt. Regimental No 6814. Harry died of wounds on the 9th November 1915. he is buried in Row I, Grave 23.


COURTNEY'S AND STEEL'S POST CEMETERY

Country: Turkey

Historical Information: The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. Courtney's Post, towards the northern end of the original Anzac line, was named from Lieut-Colonel R E Courtney, CB, VD, who brought the 14th Australian Infantry Battalion to it on 27 April 1915. Steel's Post was next to it on the south-west and was named from Major T H Steel, 14th Battalion. Both these positions were occupied on 25 April 1915 and held until the evacuation in December. There are 225 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 160 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 58 casualties believed to be buried among them.


Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Courtney's and Steel's Post Cemetery.

Private Clarence Dodds. Regimental No 412. Clarence was killed in action on the 30th April 1915. He is buried at Sp. Me. 23. 



TROIS ARBRES CEMETERY, STEENWERCK

Country: France

Historical Information: Steenwerck village remained untouched for much of the First World War, but on 10 April 1918 it was captured by the Germans and remained in their possession until the beginning of October. Trois-Arbres passed into German hands a day later than Steenwerck, after a rearguard defence by the 34th Division. The site for Trois Arbres Cemetery was chosen for the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Station in July 1916, and Plot 1 and the earlier rows of Plot II, were made and used by that hospital until April 1918. A few further burials were made in the cemetery after the German withdrawal at the end of 1918 and after the Armistice, over 700 graves were brought into it from the battlefields of Steenwerck, Nieppe, Bailleul and Neuve-Eglise. Graves from the following graveyards were concentrated into Trois-Arbres Cemetery:-. DOUANE CEMETERY, NEUVE-EGLISE, at the Custom House on the road from Neuve-Eglise to Nieppe, contained the graves of 15 soldiers from Canada and four from the United Kingdom who fell in 1915-16. FORTRIE FARM CEMETERY, NEUVE-EGLISE, 1.6Kms West of the hamlet of Le Romarin, contained the graves of 27 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell in November and December 1914. LINEN FACTORY CEMETERY, BAC-ST. MAUR. This was a row of graves in Steenwerck commune, in the angle formed by the river Lys, the road from Bac-St. Maur to Croix-du-Bac, and Edwards's Linen Factory. In it were buried 20 soldiers from the United Kingdom, one from India and seven Germans. There are now 1,704 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 435 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to ten casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

 

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Trois Arbes Cemetery.

Lance Corporal Francis Herbert Fisher. Regimental No 108. Francis died of wounds on the 30th May 1917. He is buried in Plot I,Row H, Grave No 20.



BELLICOURT BRITISH CEMETERY

Country: France

Historical Information: The Canal de St. Quentin passes under the village of Bellicourt in a tunnel 5 Kms long, built under the orders of Napoleon I. The Hindenburg Line ran west of the village, and the barges in the tunnel were used to shelter German reserves. About 5 Kms south of Bellicourt, where the canal is open, is the village of Bellenglise, where another great tunnel or dug-out was made by the Germans. On 29 September - 2 October 1918, the Battle of the St. Quentin Canal was fought. The 46th (North Midland) Division stormed the Hindenburg Line at Bellenglise and captured 4,000 prisoners and 70 guns. The 30th United States Division captured Bellicourt and Nauroy, which were cleared by the 5th Australian Division. The North Midland and Australian dead of this engagement fill most of the graves in Bellicourt British Cemetery. The cemetery was made after the battle, when 73 dead were buried in what is now Plot I. It was greatly enlarged after the Armistice, when graves were brought from the surrounding battlefields and the following smaller cemeteries:- BELLENGLISE BRITISH CEMETERY, in a field across the canal. It was made by the IX Corps in November, 1918, and almost all the 48 graves in it were those of men of the 46th Division. CARRIERE BRITISH CEMETERY, BELLICOURT, by a quarry on the East side of the Bellicourt-Bellenglise road. It contained the graves of 27 soldiers from Australia and eight from the United Kingdom who fell in October, 1918. JONCOURT RAILWAY CEMETERY, on the North side of Joncourt Station, containing the graves of 22 Australian soldiers who fell in October, 1918. MAGNY-LA-FOSSE BRITISH CEMETERY, at the East end of the village of Magny-la-Fosse, made by Field Ambulances in October, 1918 and containing the graves of 37 soldiers and airmen from the United Kingdom. MELBOURNE CEMETERY, MONTBREHAIN, on the South side of the Montbrehain-Ramicourt road, containing the graves of 15 Australian soldiers (13 of whom belonged to the 24th Battalion, from Victoria,) who fell on the 5th October, 1918. MONT-ST. MARTIN BRITISH CEMETERY, GOUY, about half way along the road from Gouy to Estrees, containing the graves of 21 soldiers from the United Kingdom, 15 from Australia and two from South Africa, who fell in October, 1918, and two German soldiers. NAUROY ROAD CEMETERY, BELLICOURT, on the Eastern outskirts of Bellicourt village, containing the graves of 21 Australian soldiers who fell at the end of September, 1918. SIEVIER CEMETERY, BEAUREVOIR, in the hamlet of Geneve, containing the graves of 22 soldiers from the United Kingdom, eight from Australia and one from Canada, who fell in October, 1918. Bellicourt British Cemetery now contains 1,204 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 313 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 21 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Charles Holden.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Bellicourt British Cemetery.

Private Cecil James Gunn MM. DCM (Recommended). Regimental No 1691.Cecil was killed in action on the 1st October 1918. He is buried in Plot I, Row E, Grave No 7.


PASSCHENDAELE NEW BRITISH CEMETERY

Country: Belgium

Historical Information: The village of Passchendaele (now Passendale) and surrounding area were associated with every phase of the First World War. In the middle of October 1914, Passchendaele was briefly under Allied occupation but by 20 October it was in German hands, where it remained for the next three years. On 6 November 1917, after the severest fighting in most unfavourable weather, the 5th Canadian Infantry Brigade took, and passed, the village; this fight was part of the Second Battle of Passchendaele, the last of the Battles of Ypres, 1917. In the middle of April 1918, in the Battles of the Lys, the Allied line was withdrawn far back on the road to Ypres, but on 29 September, in the course of the Allied offensive in Flanders, Belgian forces recaptured the village. The New British Cemetery was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields of Passchendaele and Langemarck. Almost all of the burials are from the autumn of 1917. The cemetery now contains 2,101 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 1,600 of the graves are unidentified but there are special memorials to seven casualties believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Charles Holden.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Passchendaele New British Cemetery.

Sergeant George Thomas Guinea MM. Regimental No 1762. George was killed in action on the 9th October 1917. He is buried in Plot XIV, Row D, Grave No 23.



BETHLEEM FARM WEST CEMETERY

Country: Belgium

Historical Information: Bethleem Farm West Cemetery was made by units of the 3rd Australian Division (it was known to them as the '3rd Division General Cemetery'), who captured Bethleem Farm (which can be found to the north-east) on 7 June 1917 during the Battle of Messines. It continued to be used by the 14th (Light) Division until the end of 1917. There is also an East Cemetery located nearby. There are now 165 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery including one casualty commemorated by special memorial whose grave in the cemetery was destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery also contains one unidentified burial of the Second World War. The cemetery was designed by G H Goldsmith.



Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Bethleem Farm West Cemetery.

Corporal John Leslie Guinea Regimental No 898. John was killed in action on the 8th June 1917. He was aged 22 years. He is buried in Row A, Grave No 23. 



GREVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY

Country: France

Historical Information: The village of Grevillers was occupied by Commonwealth troops on 14 March 1917 and in April and May, the 3rd, 29th and 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations were posted nearby. They began the cemetery and continued to use it until March 1918, when Grevillers was lost to the German during their great advance. On the following 24 August, the New Zealand Division recaptured Grevillers and in September, the 34th, 49th and 56th Casualty Clearing Stations came to the village and used the cemetery again. After the Armistice, 200 graves were brought in from the battlefields to the south of the village, 40 from an adjoining cemetery made during the German occupation, and some from the following:- AVESNES-LES-BAPAUME GERMAN CEMETERY, "near the British huts", which contained the graves of two soldiers from the United Kingdom who died in April 1918. BAYONET TRENCH CEMETERY, GUEUDECOURT, which contained the graves of 19 soldiers of the 1st Australian Infantry Battalion who fell on 5 November 1916. There are now 2,106 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in GREVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY. 189 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 18 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials record the names of two casualties, buried in Avesnes-les-Bapaume German Cemetery, whose graves could not be found. The cemetery also contains the graves of seven Second World War airmen, and 18 French war graves. Within the cemetery stands the GREVILLERS (NEW ZEALAND) MEMORIAL which commemorates almost 450 officers and men of the New Zealand Division who died in the defensive fighting in the area from March to August 1918, and in the Advance to Victory between 8 August and 11 November 1918, and who have no known grave. This is one of seven memorials in France and Belgium to those New Zealand soldiers who died on the Western Front and whose graves are not known. The memorials are all in cemeteries chosen as appropriate to the fighting in which the men died. The cemetery and memorial were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the  Grevillers British Cemetery.

Private Leo Gillahan. Regimental No 1913. Leo died of wounds on the 13th May 1917. He is buried in Plot II, Row E Grave No 16.


ALLONVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY

Country: France

Historical Information: The communal cemetery was used from August 1916 to February 1917 by the 39th Casualty Clearing Station then posted at Allonville, and from April to July 1918, by Australian fighting units. The cemetery contains 78 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. There is also one Second World War burial.




Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are buried at the Allonville Communal Cemetery.

Private Laurence (Lawerence) Hustler. Regimental No 266. Laurence was killed in action 31st May 1918. He is buried in Row B, grave No 10.



V.C. CORNER AUSTRALIAN CEMETERY AND MEMORIAL, FROMELLES

Country: France

Historical Information: On the morning of 19 July 1916, after a preliminary bombardment, the 5th Australian and 61st (South Midland) Divisions undertook what is officially known as the Attack at Fromelles. The 61st Division attack failed in the end, with the loss of over 1,500 officers and men out of 3,400 who took part in it. The Australian left and centre reached the German trenches and held their second line during the day and night, but the right was held off by a fierce machine-gun barrage and only reached the front line in isolated groups. The action was broken off on the morning of 20 July, after the 5th Australian Division had lost over 5,500 officers and men. It was the first serious engagement of the Australian forces in France, and the only one to achieve no success. V.C. Corner Cemetery was made after the Armistice. It contains the graves of 410 Australian soldiers who died in the Attack at Fromelles and whose bodies were found on the battlefield, but not a single body could be identified. It was therefore decided not to mark the individual graves, but to record on a memorial the names of all the Australian soldiers who were killed in the engagement and whose graves were not known. The memorial, designed by Sir Herbert Baker, commemorates over 1,200 Australian casualties. 

Penshurst War Memorial Soldiers that are remembered at V. C Corner Australian Cemetery and Memorial.

Sergeant William Henry Hunt. Regimental No 3357. William Henry killed in action on the 19th July 1916. He has no known grave and is remembered on Panel No 15.



RIBEMONT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, SOMME

Country France.

Historical Information.

This sector of the front was taken over by the Commonwealth forces in the early summer of 1915, when Mericourt-Ribemont Station, on the railway line from Amiens to Albert, became a railhead. However, it was not until the German advance at the end of March 1918 that the first burials were made at Ribemont, initially in the communal cemetery itself. The extension was begun in May and used until August 1918, when 68 burials were carried out by units engaged in the defence of Amiens. It was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields of 1918 east of Ribemont and from other cemeteries, including:-

HEILLY BRITISH CEMETERY No.2 (so called in relation to Heilly Station Cemetery), which was in the grounds of Heilly Chateau. It was made by units in April-August 1918, and it contained the graves of 79 soldiers from Australia and 24 from the United Kingdom.

HENENCOURT WOOD CEMETERY, was about 800 metres West of Henencourt, in the Wood. It was used by units and Field Ambulances from June 1916 to August 1918, and it contained the graves of 71 soldiers from the United Kingdom, 34 from Australia, one from Canada, one from South Africa, and one of an unknown unit.


HENENCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY contained one British grave and one Australian, and the Extension 26 British and nine Australian, all of 1918.

POINT 106 BRITISH CEMETERY, BRESLE, nearly 1.6 kilometres North-West of Bresle village, contained 25 graves of March-May 1918, 24 Australian and one British.

In 1929, the burials in the communal cemetery were also moved into the extension. The extension now contains 498 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 36 of the burials are unidentified and there are special memorials to two soldiers whose graves in the communal cemetery could not be found, and to 16 buried in other concentrated cemeteries whose graves were destroyed in later battles. The extension was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Sapper Oliver Keith McLennan, Regimental No: 6024. Killed in action on the 4th June 1918. Aged 23 years. Grave Reference. Special  Memorial. 



RUE-PETILLON MILITARY CEMETERY, FLEURBAIX

Country: France

Historical Information

Rue Pétillon Cemetery

British soldiers began burying their fallen comrades at Rue Pétillon in December 1914 and the cemetery was used by fighting units until it fell into German hands during the Spring Offensive of 1918. The Allies recaptured this sector of the front in September 1918 and when the war ended in November the cemetery was the site of twelve Battalion burial grounds. Many of those laid to rest here had died of wounds in a dressing station that was located in the buildings adjoining the cemetery, which were known as ‘Eaton Hall’ during the war. The cemetery was enlarged in the years after the Armistice when graves were concentrated here from the battlefields around Fleurbaix and a number of smaller burial grounds. A whole range of different Commonwealth units served in this sector during the war and the cemetery contains the graves of British, Irish, Canadian, New Zealand, and Indian soldiers, as well as over 260 men who were killed while serving with the Australian Imperial Force. Today over 1,500 war dead of the First World War are buried or commemorated here. 

Lance Corporal Edward Yarram Winchelsea Simmons. Regimental No 3253.Killed in action at Fleurbaix, France on the 15th June 1916. Aged 20 years old. Grave Reference I. K. 90.



TYNE COT CEMETERY

Country: Belguim

Historical Information

'Tyne Cot' or 'Tyne Cottage' was the name given by the Northumberland Fusiliers to a barn which stood near the level crossing on the Passchendaele-Broodseinde road. The barn, which had become the centre of five or six German blockhouses, or pill-boxes, was captured by the 3rd Australian Division on 4 October 1917, in the advance on Passchendaele. One of these pill-boxes was unusually large and was used as an advanced dressing station after its capture. From 6 October to the end of March 1918, 343 graves were made, on two sides of it, by the 50th (Northumbrian) and 33rd Divisions, and by two Canadian units. The cemetery was in German hands again from 13 April to 28 September, when it was finally recaptured, with Passchendaele, by the Belgian Army.

TYNE COT CEMETERY was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when remains were brought in from the battlefields of Passchendaele and Langemarck, and from a few small burial grounds, including the following:

IBERIAN SOUTH CEMETERY and IBERIAN TRENCH CEMETERY, LANGEMARCK, 1,200 metres North of Frezenberg, close to a farm called by the Army "Iberian". These contained the graves of 30 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell in August-September, 1917, and March, 1918.

KINK CORNER CEMETERY, ZONNEBEKE, on the road to Frezenberg, containing the graves of 14 soldiers from the United Kingdom, nine from Canada and nine from Australia, who fell in September-November, 1917.

LEVI COTTAGE CEMETERY, ZONNEBEKE, near the road to Langemarck, containing the graves of ten soldiers from the United Kingdom, eight from Canada and three from Australia, who fell in September-November, 1917.

OOSTNIEUWKERKE GERMAN CEMETERY, in the village of Oostnieuwkerke, containing the graves of two soldiers from the United Kingdom.

PRAET-BOSCH GERMAN CEMETERY, VLADSLOO, in the forest on the road from Kortewilde to Leke. Here were buried six officers of the R.F.C. and R.A.F. who fell in 1917-18.

STADEN GERMAN CEMETERY, on the South-East side of the road to Stadenberg, containing the graves of 14 soldiers from the United Kingdom and ten from Canada who fell in 1915-1917.

WATERLOO FARM CEMETERY, PASSCHENDAELE, 650 metres North-East of Gravenstafel, containing the graves of ten soldiers from Canada, seven from the United Kingdom and two from New Zealand, who fell in 1917-18.

ZONNEBEKE BRITISH CEMETERY No.2, on the road between Zonnebeke and Broodseinde, in which the Germans buried 18 men of the 2nd Buffs and 20 of the 3rd Royal Fusiliers who fell in April, 1915.

It is now the largest Commonwealth war cemetery in the world in terms of burials. At the suggestion of King George V, who visited the cemetery in 1922, the Cross of Sacrifice was placed on the original large pill-box. There are three other pill-boxes in the cemetery.

There are now 11,956 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in Tyne Cot Cemetery. 8,369 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to more than 80 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate 20 casualties whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. There are 4 German burials, 3 being unidentified. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

The TYNE COT MEMORIAL forms the north-eastern boundary of Tyne Cot Cemetery and commemorates nearly 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom and New Zealand who died in the Ypres Salient after 16 August 1917 and whose graves are not known. The memorial stands close to the farthest point in Belgium reached by Commonwealth forces in the First World War until the final advance to victory.

The memorial was designed by Sir Herbert Baker with sculpture by F V Blundstone.

Private Alvin Astley Kent. Regimental No 6052. He was killed in action on the 12th October 1917. Aged 22 years. Grave Reference XXIII. F. 18.


LONGUENESSE (ST. OMER) SOUVENIR CEMETERY

Country: France

Historical Information

St. Omer was the General Headquarters of the British Expeditionary Force from October 1914 to March 1916. Lord Roberts died there in November 1914. The town was a considerable hospital centre with the 4th, 10th, 7th Canadian, 9th Canadian and New Zealand Stationary Hospitals, the 7th, 58th (Scottish) and 59th (Northern) General Hospitals, and the 17th, 18th and 1st and 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations all stationed there at some time during the war. St. Omer suffered air raids in November 1917 and May 1918, with serious loss of life. The cemetery takes its names from the triangular cemetery of the St. Omer garrison, properly called the Souvenir Cemetery (Cimetiere du Souvenir Francais) which is located next to the War Cemetery. The Commonwealth section of the cemetery contains 2,874 Commonwealth burials of the First World War (6 unidentified), with special memorials commemorating 23 men of the Chinese Labour Corps whose graves could not be exactly located. Second World War burials number 403, (93 unidentified). Within the Commonwealth section there are also 34 non-war burials and 239 war graves of other nationalities. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

Gunner Francis Allan Mereweather. Regimental No 949. Died of wounds on the 1st November 1917. Aged 29 years.  Grave Reference IV. E. 74.


CHICHESTER CEMETERY

Country: England

Historical Information

Of the 89 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war, the majority are in a War Graves Plot in Squares 121 and 126 bordering a path on the far right hand side of the cemetery. This was constructed by the City Corporation, who also erected the War Cross at the eastern end of the enclosed plot especially designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and closely resembling the Commission's own Cross of Sacrifice. The names of the 1914-1918 war dead in the cemetery are engraved on the base of the Cross. There are also 75 Commonwealth burials of the 1939-1945 war here, mainly in two adjoining Church of England dedicated Squares, Nos. 115 and 159, in the south-western portion of the cemetery enclosed by a hedgerow on three sides, on the fourth side a wall bearing the inscription 1939-1945 THE MEN AND WOMEN BURIED IN THIS PLOT DIED IN THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE. In the northern section a further Square, No. 42, is dedicated to Roman Catholic burials, there is a metal plaque bearing a similar inscription. There are also 7 non-Commonwealth war burials and 4 non World War burials in the care of C.W.G.C. within the cemetery.

Private Stanley Frederick Charles Thacker. Regimental No. 2160. He died of wounds on the 4th May 1917. Aged 27 years.  Grave Reference 121. 51



UNDERHILL FARM CEMETERY

Country: Belguim

'Underhill Farm' and 'Red Lodge' were the names given to two buildings on the north-western edge of Ploegsteert Wood. They were occupied by dressing stations and the cemetery which they used, is close to the farm. The cemetery was begun in June 1917 and used until January 1918. It fell into German hands in the spring of 1918, when it was used under the name of "The Military Cemetery at the foot of the Nightingale Hill". The cemetery was recovered in September 1918 and used again for Commonwealth burials until October. There are 190 Commonwealth casualties of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. Nine of the burials are unidentified and special memorials commemorate five casualties whose exact places of burial in the cemetery could not be determined. The cemetery was designed by G H Goldsmith.



Private Thorald Womersley. Regimental No 480. Died of wounds on the 13th June 1919 aged 22 years. Grave Reference II. B. 179.



KANTARA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY

Country: Egypt

Historical Information.

In the early part of the First World War, Kantara was an important point in the defence of Suez against Turkish attacks and marked the starting point of the new railway east towards Sinai and Palestine, begun in January 1916. Kantara developed into a major base and hospital centre and the cemetery was begun in February 1916 for burials from the various hospitals, continuing in use until late 1920. After the Armistice, the cemetery was more than doubled in size when graves were brought in from other cemeteries and desert battlefields, notably those at Rumani, Qatia, El Arish and Rafa. The Second World War again saw Kantara as a hospital centre. No 1 General Hospital was there from July 1941 to December 1945 and two others, Nos 41 and 92, were there in turn for varying periods. One of the major allied medical units in the area, No 8 Polish General Hospital, adjoined the war cemetery. KANTARA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY now contains 1,562 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 110 from the Second World War. There are also 341 war graves of other nationalities in the cemetery, many of them made from the Polish hospital and concentrated in a distinct Polish extension. Near the entrance to the cemetery is the KANTARA MEMORIAL, bearing the names of 16 New Zealand servicemen of the First World War who died in actions at Rumani and Rafa, and who have no known grave. In 1961, nearby Kantara Indian Cemetery became inaccessible and it was decided that the 283 First World War servicemen buried there should instead be commemorated at Kantara War Memorial Cemetery. Panels bearing the names of the dead were affixed to the wall of the cemetery behind the Stone of Remembrance, forming the KANTARA INDIAN CEMETERY MEMORIAL.

Trooper Edgar Womersley. Regimental No. 752. Died of wounds on the 2nd November 1917 aged 24 years. Grave Reference E. 119.



7TH FIELD AMBULANCE CEMETERY

Country:Turkey (including Gallipoli)

Historical Information.

The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. On 6 August, further landings were made at Suvla, just north of Anzac, and the climax of the campaign came in early August when simultaneous assaults were launched on all three fronts. The cemetery was named from the 7th Australian Field Ambulance, which landed on Gallipoli in September 1915, but over 350 of the graves were brought in from earlier cemeteries after the Armistice (the majority of the casualties are therefore not Australian, but mainly 54th (East Anglian) Division). These smaller burial grounds were known as Bedford Ridge, West Ham Gully, Waldron's Point, Essex, Aghyl Dere, Eastern Mounted Brigade, Suffolk, Hampshire Lane Nos. 1 and 2, Australia Valley, 116th Essex, 1/8th Hants, Norfolk, Junction, and 1/4th Northants. There are now 640 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 276 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate 207 casualties known or believed to be buried among them


Private John Edward Williams. Regimental No. 510. Killed in action on the 8th August 1915 aged 24 years. Grave Reference Special  Memorial . C. 26.


QUEANT ROAD CEMETERY, BUISSY

Country: France

Locality: Pas de Calais

Historical Information.

Buissy was reached by the Third Army on 2 September 1918, after the storming of the Drocourt-Queant line, and it was evacuated by the Germans on the following day. Queant Cemetery was made by the 2nd and 57th Casualty Clearing Stations in October and November 1918. It then consisted of 71 graves (now Plot I, Rows A and B), but was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when 2200 graves were brought in from the battlefields of 1917-1918 between Arras and Bapaume, and from the following smaller burial grounds in the area:-

BARALLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY BRITISH EXTENSION, which was made in September 1918, contained the graves of 25 soldiers from the United Kingdom; and the GERMAN EXTENSION, from which two graves were brought.

CAGNICOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY, contained the grave of one soldier from the United Kingdom who fell in September 1918.

LAGNICOURT (6th JAEGER REGIMENT) GERMAN CEMETERY, East of the village, contained 137 German graves and one British.

NOREUIL BRITISH CEMETERIES No.1 and No.2. These were close together, about 400 metres North of Noreuil village. They were made in April-August 1917, and they contained the graves of 50 soldiers from Australia and 16 from the United Kingdom (some of these were re-buried in H.A.C. Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mein).

NOREUIL GERMAN CEMETERY No.1, next to Noreuil Australian Cemetery, contained 78 German graves and ten British.

PRONVILLE GERMAN CEMETERY "near the Cave", on the Western outskirts of Pronville, contained 17 British graves.

PRONVILLE GERMAN CEMETERY No.4, South of Pronville on the road to Beaumetz, contained 83 German and 83 British graves (52 of the British being those of soldiers of the Black Watch).

PROVILLE CHURCHYARD, contained two British graves.

There are now 2,377 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 1,441 of the burials are unidentified, but there are special memorials to 56 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate 26 casualties buried in German cemeteries in the neighborhood, whose graves could not be found on concentration. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin 

Private John Henry Williams. Regimental No 5775. He was killed in action on the 11th April 1917 aged 20 years. Grave Reference I. D. 10.


BORRE CHURCHYARD

Country:France

Locality:Nord

Identified Casualties:10

Location Information. Borre is a village 3 kilometres east of Hazebrouck.

Historical Information.

There are now 10, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. The dates of death are from 1915 and 1918.

Private Albert Ernest Leslie Jewell  MM. Regimental No 6288. He died of wounds on the 15th April 1918. Grave Reference A. 4 



WYTSCHAETE MILITARY CEMETERY

Country: Belgium

Historical Information

Wytschaete (now Wijtschate) was taken by the Germans early in November 1914. It was recovered by Commonwealth forces during the Battle of Messines on 7 June 1917, but fell into German hands once more on 16 April 1918. The village was recovered for the last time on 28 September.The cemetery was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from isolated positions surrounding Wytschaete and the following small battlefield cemeteries:-

REST AND BE THANKFUL FARM, KEMMEL: 23 UK burials (13 of them 2nd Suffolks), mostly of 1915.

R.E. (BEAVER) FARM, KEMMEL: 18 Royal Engineer and four Canadian Engineer burials of 1915-1917.

The CEMETERY NEAR ROSSIGNOL ESTAMINET, KEMMEL: 18 UK burials (11 of the 1st Wiltshire Regiment), of January-April 1915.

SOMER FARM CEMETERY No.2, WYTSCHAETE: 13 UK burials made by IXth Corps in June 1917.

GORDON CEMETERY, KEMMEL: 19 UK burials (14 of them 1st Gordon Highlanders) of January-May 1915.

There are now 1,002 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 673 of the burials are unidentified, but there are special memorials to 16 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate casualties known to have been buried at the Cemetery near Rossignol Estaminet, RE (Beaver) Farm and Rest and be Thankful Farm, whose graves could not be found on concentration. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Private Michel Kennealy . Regimental No. 3993. He was killed in action on the 7th June 1917. Aged about 37 years.  Grave Reference V. B. 19.


CROUY BRITISH CEMETERY, CROUY-SUR-SOMME

Country: France

Historical Information

The cemetery was used between April and August 1918 for burials from the 5th and 47th Casualty Clearing Stations, which had come to the village because of the German advance. In October 1919, 42 graves were brought to Crouy from the small military cemetery at Riviere, a few kilometres away to the north-west. These burials had been made from the 12th, 53rd and 55th Casualty Clearing Stations at Longpre-les-Corps Saints between May and August 1918. They now occupy rows E and F of plot IV and part of row D, plot VI. The cemetery now contains 739 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, and a number of French and German war graves. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.



Private William Henry Luke Regimental No.3192. Died of wounds on the 27th April 1918.  Grave Reference II. A. 8.



BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY

Country:France

Historical Information

Boulogne, was one of the three base ports most extensively used by the Commonwealth armies on the Western Front throughout the First World War. It was closed and cleared on the 27 August 1914 when the Allies were forced to fall back ahead of the German advance, but was opened again in October and from that month to the end of the war, Boulogne and Wimereux formed one of the chief hospital areas. Until June 1918, the dead from the hospitals at Boulogne itself were buried in the Cimetiere de L'Est, one of the town cemeteries, the Commonwealth graves forming a long, narrow strip along the right hand edge of the cemetery. In the spring of 1918, it was found that space was running short in the Eastern Cemetery in spite of repeated extensions to the south, and the site of the new cemetery at Terlincthun was chosen. During the Second World War, hospitals were again posted to Boulogne for a short time in May 1940. The town was taken by the Germans at the end of that month and remained in their hands until recaptured by the Canadians on 22 September 1944. Boulogne Eastern Cemetery contains 5,577 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 224 from the Second World War. The Commonwealth plots were designed by Charles Holden.


Private Leo Gordon Myers. Regimental No 964. He died of wounds on the 5th April 1918. Grave Reference VIII. I. 183.


PERONNE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

Country: France

Historical Information

Peronne was taken by the German on 24 September 1914. On 18 March 1917, the 40th and 48th Divisions captured the town, but it was recovered by the Germans on the 23rd March 1918. It changed hands for the last time on 1 September 1918, when it was taken by the 2nd Australian Division The cemetery extension was begun by the 48th (South Midland) Division in March 1917, used by the Germans in 1918, and resumed by Australian units in September 1918. At the Armistice it contained 177 graves, now in Plots I and II. It was then enlarged when graves were brought in from the battlefields north and east of Peronne and from the following small cemeteries in the area:-

AIZECOURT-LE-HAUT CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, which contained the graves of 18 soldiers from the United Kingdom and two from South Africa who fell in March 1918.

CARTIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY AND GERMAN EXTENSION, which contained the graves of 5,250 German soldiers, two from the United Kingdom and one from Australia.

COPSE TRENCH CEMETERY, ALLAINES, between Allaines and Moislains. Here were buried 64 soldiers from the United Kingdom (mainly 14th Black Watch and 12th Somerset Light Infantry) who fell in September 1918.

DRIENCOURT BRITISH CEMETERY, on the South side of the village, made by the 74th (Yeomanry) Division in September 1918, and contained the graves of 20 soldiers from the United Kingdom.

LIERAMONT COMMUNAL CEMETERY GERMAN EXTENSION, in which 63 soldiers from the United Kingdom were buried by the Germans in 1916-1918 and by the 58th (London) Division in September 1918.

MADAME MILITARY CEMETERY, Clery-sur-Somme (the origin of this name is uncertain, but the Germans had a "Maidan Trench" opposite), near the road to Bouchavesnes, where 56 soldiers from the United Kingdom (mainly 33rd Division) were buried in January-March 1917 (Three of these were moved to Serre Road Cemetery No.2, Beaumont-Hamel, and 53 to Peronne).

MOISLAINS BRITISH CEMETERY, a little South-West of the village, contained the graves of 54 soldiers of the 47th London) Division who fell in September 1918.

MOISLAINS CHURCHYARD, which contained the graves of three soldiers from the United Kingdom and one from Canada.

MOISLAINS GERMAN HOSPITAL CEMETERY, at the North-East end of the village, contained the graves of 38 soldiers of the Empire, who fell in 1917 and 1918, and 281 Germans.

TEMPLEUX-LA-FOSSE GERMAN CEMETERY, on the East side of the village, contained the graves of 34 soldiers from the United Kingdom. Of these 33 were buried by their comrades in September 1918.

VAUX WOOD BRITISH CEMETERY, VAUX-SUR-SOMME, within Eastern edge of the wood. Here were buried, in September 1918, 25 soldiers from the United Kingdom (mainly of the London Regiment).

There are now 1,579 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the extension. 220 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to seven casualties known or believed to be buried among them, and ten buried in other cemeteries whose graves could not be found. The extension also contains five Second World War burials. There are 97 German war graves, 68 being unidentified. The adjoining communal cemetery contains the grave of one airman of the First World War, killed in August 1914.The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

Lance Corporal William Edward Quill MM. Regimental No. 1252. Killed in action on the 1st September 1918 aged 26 years. Grave Reference V. A. 1.


WARLOY-BAILLON COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

Country: France

Historical Information

The first Commonwealth burial took place in the communal cemetery in October 1915 and the last on 1 July 1916. By that date, field ambulances had come to the village in readiness for the attack on the German front line eight kilometres away, and the extension was begun on the eastern side of the cemetery. The fighting from July to November 1916 on the northern part of the Somme front accounts for the majority of the burials in the extension, but some are from the German attack in the spring of 1918. The extension contains 1,331 First World War Commonwealth burials and two from the Second World War. There are also 18 German war graves in the extension. The communal cemetery contains 46 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 158 French war graves. The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.


Private George Alexander Webb. Regimental No  4630. He died of wounds on the 9th August 1916 aged 20 years.



BERNAFAY WOOD BRITISH CEMETERY, MONTAUBAN

Country: France

Historical Information

Montauban village was taken by the 30th and 18th Divisions on 1 July 1916 and it remained in Commonwealth hands until the end of March 1918. It was retaken on 25 August 1918 by the 7th Buffs and the 11th Royal Fusiliers of the 18th Division. The Bois De Bernafay is a pear-shaped wood close to the east end of Montauban village. It was taken on 3 and 4 July 1916 by the 9th (Scottish) Division. On 25 March 1918, in the retreat to the Ancre, the same Division was driven from the wood but recaptured it for a time. On 27 August 1918 it was finally regained by the 18th Division. The cemetery was begun by a dressing station in August 1916 and used as a front-line cemetery until the following April. It contained at the Armistice 284 burials but was then increased when graves were brought in from Bernafay Wood North Cemetery and from the battlefields immediately east of the wood. BERNAFAY WOOD NORTH CEMETERY was opposite the North edge of the wood, a little East of the Longueval - Maricourt road. It was begun by an Advanced Dressing Station, and used from July to October 1916. It contained the graves of 80 soldiers from the United Kingdom and 1 German prisoner. Bernafay Wood British Cemetery now contains 945 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 417 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 11 soldiers known or believed to be buried here. Other special memorials commemorate 12 soldiers buried in Bernafay Wood North Cemetery whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

Albert William Dark. Regimental No. 1157. Died of wounds on the 5th December 1916 aged 27 years.. Grave Reference I. 44.



TWELVE TREE COPSE (NEW ZEALAND) MEMORIAL

Country: Turkey (including Gallipoli)

Historical Information

TWELVE TREE COPSE (NEW ZEALAND) MEMORIAL is one of four memorials erected to commemorate New Zealand soldiers who fell on the Gallipoli peninsula and whose graves are not known. The memorial relates to engagements outside the limits of Anzac in which New Zealand soldiers took part. It bears almost 180 names.

TWELVE TREE COPSE CEMETERY was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from isolated sites and small burial grounds on the battlefields of April - August and December 1915. The most significant of these burial grounds were Geoghan's Bluff Cemetery, containing 925 graves associated with fighting at Gully Ravine in June - July 1915: Fir Tree Wood Cemetery, where the 29th Division and New Zealand Infantry Brigade fought in May 1915 and Clunes Vennel Cemetery, containing 522 graves.There are now 3,360 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 2,226 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate many casualties known or believed to be buried among them, including 142 officers and men of the 1st Essex who died on 6 August 1915, and 47 of the 1st/7th Scottish Rifles killed on 28 June

George William McKenna. Regimental No. 12/1735. 42 Regiment Auckland N Z E F. George was killed in action on the 8th May 1915 aged 42 years.



BRANDHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY

Country: Belgium

Historical Information

During the First World War, Brandhoek was within the area comparatively safe from shell fire which extended beyond Vlamertinghe Church. Field ambulances were posted there continuously and the Military Cemetery was opened early in May 1915 in a field adjoining the dressing station. It closed in July 1917 when the New Military Cemetery was opened nearby, to be followed by the New Military Cemetery No 3 in August 1917.Brandhoek Military Cemetery now contains 669 First World War burials.The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.




Gunner Patrick James O’Brien. Regimental No 3460. Died of wounds on the 15th July 1917. Grave Reference I. N. 7.Cemetery


ESTAIRES COMMUNAL CEMETERY AND EXTENSION

Country: France

Historical Information

Estaires town was occupied by French cavalry on the 15 October 1914, and passed at once into British hands. On the 10 April 1918 it was captured by the enemy, after an obstinate defence by the 50th (Northumbrian) Division; and it was finally retaken by British troops at the beginning of September 1918.The town was a Field Ambulance centre as early as November 1914, and later the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station was posted in it. It was later "adopted" by the County Borough of Plymouth. Estaires Communal Cemetery was used for British burials from the early days of November 1914 to June 1917, and two burials of September 1918 are in Plot II, Row P. Estaires Communal Cemetery Extension was used from April 1917 to April 1918, and again in September-November 1918. The Plots are numbered IV and V, in continuation of the numbering for the Communal Cemetery. The Portuguese graves of June-August 1917 and two French graves were removed after the Armistice. A German Plot of 63 graves, made on the North side during the enemy occupation in 1918, has been removed. There are a total of 875 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war here, 63 of which are unidentified. There are 9 Commonwealth burials of the 1939-45 War, killed during the withdrawal of the British Expeditionary Force to Dunkirk at the end of May 1940. There are also 14 Non Commonwealth burials in C.W.G.C. care. The five Plots cover an area of 3,336 square metres

Private Leslie Archibald Hayes. Regimental No. 568. Died of wounds on the 26th July 1916. Grave Reference II. W. 15.


DOULLENS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION NO.1

Country: France

Historical Information

Doullens was Marshal Foch's headquarters early in the First World War and the scene of the conference in March 1918, after which he assumed command of the Allied armies on the Western Front. From the summer of 1915 to March 1916, Doullens was a junction between the French Tenth Army on the Arras front and the Commonwealth Third Army on the Somme. The citadelle, overlooking the town from the south, was a French military hospital, and the railhead was used by both armies. In March 1916, Commonwealth forces succeeded the French on the Arras front and the 19th Casualty Clearing Station came to Doullens, followed by the 41st, the 35th and the 11th. By the end of 1916, these had given way to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital (which stayed until June 1918) and the 2/1st Northumbrian Casualty Clearing Station. From February 1916 to April 1918, these medical units continued to bury in the French extension (No 1) of the communal cemetery. In March and April 1918 the German advance and the desperate fighting on this front threw a severe strain on the Canadian Stationary Hospital. The extension was filled, and a second extension begun on the opposite side of the communal cemetery. In May 1940, Doullens was bombed with Arras and Abbeville before being occupied by the Germans.

The COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION No 1 contains 1,335 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. There are also seven French and 13 German war graves from this period. Second World War burials number 35, more than half of them men of the Queen's Royal West Kents who died 20/21 May 1940.

The COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION no 2 contains 374 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, and 87 German war graves. The COMMUNAL CEMETERY itself contains ten Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. The extensions were designed by Charles Holden.

Private Thomas Patrick Williams. Regimental No. 3488. He died of wounds on the 18th April 1918. Grave Reference VI. C. 55.


The following soldiers died in Australia.

Private Donald Cameron. Regimental No 1225. He died on the 18th November 1916 aged 31 years. He died of an illness and is buried at Boram Boram Cemetery.

Private Michael Andrew Carey.  Regimental No "Depot" Michael died on the 12th May 1916 of Tuberculosis and is buried at Ballarat.



We have been unable to trace these soldiers.

Private Dd Cameron.

Private M W Williams

Private T Salter

Private R Wallen

Private T White

Private R Williams

Private E Jewell

If you have any information as to who they may be please Email us at Pensearch@iprimus.com.au




We would like to sincerely thank the Commonwealth War Graves Commission for the use of their information on our war dead.

The CWGC can be contacted at http://www.cwgc.org/